WSJ: Google to offer Dropbox-like ‘Drive’ service

Watch out, Dropbox. You’re about to get some competition from Google. At least, that’s what the Wall Street Journal says, quoting "people familiar with the matter" who claim Google is on the verge of introducing a rival cloud storage service.

The Google service, called Drive, is "expected to launch in the coming weeks or months." It will be free of charge for most users, although the Wall Street Journal says large quantities of online storage will be available for a fee. (That fee, incidentally, is said to be less than what Dropbox currently charges.) Google Drive should behave in much the same way as Dropbox, allowing users to upload large files into the cloud from PCs and mobile devices, and to then share those files with a link.

Sound familiar? It did to me, too, probably because there have been scattered rumors about a Google cloud storage service for years. The Journal notes that Google’s Larry Page previously worked on a service called "G Drive" that was supposed to launch in late 2007. We continued to see reports about G Drive, like this story from TG Daily dated January 19, 2009, for a long time after that. (Thanks to Liliputing for the tip.)

Comments closed
    • HisDivineOrder
    • 8 years ago

    I thought Google decided they didn’t want to save “files” as they are conventionally kept to the Cloud. They wanted you to make things in the Cloud and leave them in the Cloud. Not keep doing things the way we always have and then store them in the Cloud.

    Chrome OS was supposed to be the leader in this. If G Drive or Drive is truly coming (and believe me, I hope it is finally), then I think Chrome OS is going to have the life support cut. Perhaps it already was and I failed to notice? Either way, I think Drive sounds great. And of course, it’s a win for Google who’d love to add your files to its huge index of personally-identifiable information from which it can generate advertising content.

    I hope they don’t have the stupid file size limits of Skydrive or the small available capacity of the free versions of Dropbox.

    • Aussienerd
    • 8 years ago

    “allowing users to upload large files into the cloud from PCs and mobile devices, and to then share those files with a link”

    This is almost the same way that ‘Megaupload’ was described to us in the local newspaper.

    • albundy
    • 8 years ago

    brings back memories of Gmail Drive…I loved the win explorer integration too. But that was years ago. Unless google can offer 50GB+ of space and 2GB file size limits, its gonna be hard to compete with Adrive and other sites.

    • jpostel
    • 8 years ago

    I have to point out the corporate IT types might be a bit more interested in the VMware project that allows managed hybrid internal\external storage service.

    [url<]http://www.vmwareoctopus.com/[/url<] disclaimer: I work at VMware.

      • Flatland_Spider
      • 8 years ago

      That’s really cool; I’ve been looking for something like that. I just have to expect it’s going to to insanely expensive since it’s coming from VMware.

        • jpostel
        • 8 years ago

        Setting the price is not my gig, and it’s still beta. Talk to your sales rep about getting into the beta so you can make an informed comparison when the time comes.

        Dropbox is $125/yr per user for the “Teams” version, and Box.net is $180 for the “Business” version (Enterprise version has more features, but is not a published price), so I try to think about it in terms of “competition creates options for customers”.

          • Flatland_Spider
          • 8 years ago

          There’s not really a comparison. Octopus can be self hosted, and the others can’t. I have proprietary and confidential data to protect and lawyers to appease.

          Alfresco and Sharepoint would be the closest things I would compare. Mainly Alfresco since it’s much more Linux friendly.

    • crose
    • 8 years ago

    What took them so long? They are even behind MS here.

      • ImSpartacus
      • 8 years ago

      They had no need. Gmail provides plenty of storage for email. Docs has enough storage for documents. Youtube and G+ have enough storage for videos. G+ can handle consumer photos. Music has enough storage for music.

      Using Google’s Internet-based computing lifestyle, what else would a consumer need to store?

        • Flatland_Spider
        • 8 years ago

        Hopefully, this is about having one backend to upload everything or download everything. It would make it more seamless interacting with Google services.

        1) Mount the GDrive.
        2) Upload content into specially tagged folders via a sync utility. Pictures go into pictures and show up on Picassa and Google+. Code goes into a folder for App engine or Sites. Word files go into a Docs share folder for public access or into a private folder for only you.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 8 years ago

    All your personal documents are belong to Google.

      • Farting Bob
      • 8 years ago

      If you willingly upload it to them, yes. But then all your personal documents are belong to Fartingbob if you send them over to me and sign an agreement saying i can do what i like with them….

      • dashbarron
      • 8 years ago

      That tight integration with Gmail and Google Docs…all our base belongs to them!

    • sweatshopking
    • 8 years ago

    yay! “posts something about how google is copying skydrive to make people annoyed at me”

      • Flatland_Spider
      • 8 years ago

      I’d wish they’d copy some other features of Skydrive, and I’d also like it if they add controls for Android phones like MS has on Live.com accounts.

      • Deanjo
      • 8 years ago

      Skydrive? You mean that service that MS copied from a countless number of ISP’s and other third parties?

        • sweatshopking
        • 8 years ago

        that’s the one!

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