Radeon HD 7700-series availability is spotty

Hoping to grab a Radeon HD 7700-series graphics card the day after launch? Well, we’ve got good news and bad news. The good news is that the 7770 and 7750 are both available at major U.S. e-tailers right now, and their prices aren’t marked up. The bad news is that availability is spotty outside of Newegg. The Radeon HD 7750 is particularly hard to find.

We checked availability by seeking out cards at Newegg, TigerDirect, and Amazon here in the States. Those are all large retailers with sizable stocks, and other, smaller vendors seem to be slipping behind. North of the border, we looked at NCIX. The cards we found are listed below with available models highlighted in green. All prices are in U.S. dollars except for NCIX’s, which are in Canadian dollars. We didn’t account for mail-in rebates. Oh, and items listed on Amazon but not sold by Amazon itself are denoted with an asterisk.

Here are the Radeon HD 7770 listings we found:

  Price (U.S.) Price (CAD)
Model Newegg Amazon TigerDirect NCIX.com
Asus HD7770-DC-1GD5 $159.99      
Gigabyte GV-R777D5-1GD  $159.99      
Gigabyte GV-R777OC-1GD   $178.18   $159.99
HIS H777F1G2M   $179.32    
MSI ?   $200.64*    
MSI R7770-2PMD1GD5/OC $159.99     $172.98
PowerColor AX7770 1GBD5-2DH $159.99     $159.99
Sapphire 11201-00-20G $159.99 $189.55 $159.99 $159.99
Sapphire 11201-02-20G $169.99 $196.36    
Sapphire 11201-02-40G $179.99      
XFX FX-777A-ZDB4 $179.99     $179.99
XFX FX-777A-ZDF4 $169.99 $185.00 $169.99 $169.99
XFX FX-777A-ZNF4 $159.99   $159.99 $178.19
Lowest $159.99 $159.99
Median $169.99 $169.99

And here are the 7750 listings:

  Price (U.S.) Price (CAD)
Model Newegg Amazon TigerDirect NCIX.com
Asus HD7750-1GD5 $109.99      
Gigabyte GV-R775OC-1GI   $127.05    
HIS H775F1GD $109.99 $157.73    
Lowest $109.99 N/A
Median $118.52 N/A

Based on our findings, Newegg seems to have gotten the bulk of initial shipments. Amazon has not one card in stock. An unlabeled MSI Radeon HD 7770 is available through the Amazon Marketplace, but at $200.64, it’s prohibitively expensive. Meanwhile, TigerDirect and NCIX each have all of three cards ready to go.

The Radeon HD 7750’s availability situation is even more dire. Listings are hard to come by, and we only found a single model in stock. At least it wasn’t marked up above AMD’s suggested e-tail price.

As we said in our review, the Radeon HD 7770 and 7750 are both going to need price cuts before they become truly appealing. Right now, the Radeon HD 7770 is especially hard to recommend when the quicker Radeon HD 6850 can be nabbed for as little as $139.99. 7700-series prices will no doubt go down over time—and more cards will no doubt hit stores—but there’s a lot of room for improvement right now.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 11 years ago

    If something is new, isn’t availability always spotty? There are exceptions but this situation isn’t a surprise at all.

    • JustAnEngineer
    • 11 years ago

    $210 +9 shipping -35MIR is not $175. It’s going to turn out to be $219 more often than it’s $184, too.

    Nevertheless, your main point is valid. Previous-generation cards like the Radeon HD6870, GeForce GTX560Ti and Radeon HD6950 are a better value than current generation Radeon HD7xxx cards like the Radeon HD7770 and HD7950 are so far.

    Let’s just wait for Pitcairn (Radeon HD7870) and for Kepler (GeForce xxx 7xx).

    • Chrispy_
    • 11 years ago

    The problem is that Nvidia drivers are also far from perfect.

    AMD drivers are as good (or bad) as Nvidia drivers in Windows these days. Nvidia drivers probably have a Linux advantage still, but 3D-gaming in Linux is fast becoming an oxymoron as almost everything is DirectX9, 10, or 11.

    • BestJinjo
    • 11 years ago

    GTX560 is junk? It beats HD7770 by ~20% despite being “junk” as you say.

    [url<]http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/hardware-canucks-reviews/51543-amd-radeon-hd-7770-hd-7750-review-16.html[/url<] and [url<]http://www.legionhardware.com/articles_pages/amd_radeon_hd_7770_7750,3.html[/url<] In fact for $175, you can get a GTX560 Ti that destroys the HD7770. [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814162074[/url<] And what's wrong with the excellent HD6870 at $140-160? HD6870 and GTX560 Ti are excellent mid-range cards. Doubtful that GTX660 will cost $140-175.

    • wierdo
    • 11 years ago

    I’m actually surprised the card performs this well considering the 128-bit mem channel limit, I don’t like going any lower than 256-bit, but the 7750 is tempting for $110 and low power usage, if they come out with a quiet version I might consider it, the stock fan sucks for my silent PC needs.

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 11 years ago

    I don’t get why. This card is just like the nvidia GeForce 8600 series: way, way too watered-down to be mid-ranged. 128-bit memory interface cards are terrible.

    • cegras
    • 11 years ago

    :\

    • MadManOriginal
    • 11 years ago

    I too once wanted an ATi card, then I took an AMD driver to the knee…

    • entropy13
    • 11 years ago

    Those were yield problems. That’s why they got out 1GB versions of the 6950 and 6970 as DIFFERENT SKUs and not as vendor-specific versions.

    And then reviews were released that confirms that both were not as overclockable as their 2GB counterparts and the former is not unlockable at all.

    • Game_boy
    • 11 years ago

    Limited supply =/= yield problems. AMD did not attribute anything to yield problems in conference calls.

    • travbrad
    • 11 years ago

    We must be living in different universes then because I remember the 5xxx series having yield problems and limited supply for weeks/months after launch. It was so big a problem that they actually increased the official MSRP on 1-2 of their cards (the rest went up in price from market forces)

    • Game_boy
    • 11 years ago

    Nvidia, according to S|A, cancelled a bunch of 28nm wafers they were allocated in December because they couldn’t get products out in time to need them.

    So if they’d been on schedule they’d have had the capacity.

    • Game_boy
    • 11 years ago

    This happened on 40nm too, Nvidia whined the whole time that they had yield issues meanwhile AMD’s were fine from the 5xxx series (remember they piloted on 4770 like months before Nvidia had anything)

    • south side sammy
    • 11 years ago

    if there were problems perhaps they chose the best for the high end and mid range cards. I guess that’s where the real money is to be made.

    • Alexko
    • 11 years ago

    As far as I’m aware, AMD hasn’t complained about yields.

    • yogibbear
    • 11 years ago

    The die on the 7770 is pretty small though… so surely the yield issues wouldn’t be too bad.. :/

    • jjj
    • 11 years ago

    Nvidia said y-day that there are shortages of 28nm wafers and their yields are less than expected,so AMD has to at least have problems with capacity,if not yield.

    • yogibbear
    • 11 years ago

    I think the answer is wait 2 weeks and see how the 7870/7850 go.

    • south side sammy
    • 11 years ago

    what’s the deal with the mid range cards ? If I were going to buy that’s the area I would purchase from. Low end cards are useless and the high end are way beyond my needs, not to mention cost/insane. But seeing how I have to wait, and if I have the urge to spend needlessly, I would buy the next mid range nvidia product at this point. Had hopes for a 560 but they turned out to be junk. Perhaps the 660 will be priced right and have the performance and specs I look for for my needs.

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