Friday night topic: Good reads

With the rise of e-readers and tablets, I’ve found myself trading time formerly spent watching TV for time spent reading books. Much of that time has been spent in the fantasy genre, as we’ve previously discussed, and I’ve been making my way through many of your recommendations in that thread. (I’ve read nearly everything by Brandon Sanderson, for instance. The Way of Kings is really, really good.) However, I’m ready to take a breather and look to other genres at this point, which leads us to tonight’s topic.

What books have you read recently that you’d recommend?

I really enjoyed The Dig, which has a bit of a Crichton-esque flavor and a fun premise. However, I’m not sure what to read next.

Any suggestions? Discuss.

P.S. I’ve avoided discussion of the new iPad and its magical, wondrous display this evening in deference to the anti-Apple contingent, but I’ve started that discussion in the forums.

Comments closed
    • DrD
    • 8 years ago

    How about a techreport book club ? With an ever ongoing thread. Just a thought. It would need it’s own link, on front page.

      • thanatos355
      • 8 years ago

      Love this idea, man!

    • thanatos355
    • 8 years ago

    A week later and I still have this tab open and F5 it religiously.

    Best. FNT. Evah!

      • thanatos355
      • 8 years ago

      I still have this page opened, and I still refresh it regularly. Go me! πŸ˜›

    • trackerben
    • 8 years ago

    What I’m slowly digesting right now is Dr. John Lennox’s latest treatise, “Seven Days That Divide the World”. I have always thought that the premises behind the Abrahamic description of a multipart origin for this universe were not incompatible with those behind current theories in physics and cosmology, and Lennox’s writings seems to bear this out. But as with any serious work by a renowned polymath like Lennox (an Oxford mathematician, philosopher, theologian, and linguist), the integrative concepts are at a level I can barely clue into.

    It should be maddeningly simple to anyone on the high side of the IQ fall-off. I can understand the science which is familiar and well-known since little has changed until very recently. What I’m not too sure of are his plausibility analyses for OT events which I don’t have the biblical knowledge to validate, let alone evaluate in light of the science. I may just put it off as speculative cosmogony until I gain a view on what “ordinary” scientists and philosophers are thinking here.

    • TheMonkeyKing
    • 8 years ago

    Free books for any tablet:
    [url<]http://www.epubbooks.com/[/url<] [url<]http://www.gutenberg.org/[/url<] For sci-fi or fantasy, look for H. Rider Haggard, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Poe, E.E. "Doc" Smith (yup, his books are now in public domain), Comedy: P. G. Wodehouse, Others: Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo) Search by genre: [url<]http://www.epubbooks.com/genres[/url<]

    • sonofsanta
    • 8 years ago

    Surprised no-one has mentioned China Mieville yet – really, really good stuff, like a more literary (and insane) Neil Gaiman (+1 for American Gods, btw). Ideas all over the place but the energy is brilliant.

    Read The City & The City if you want to feel smart, or Kraken if you just want a ridiculously mad tale of the squid apocalypse in London. I’m sure his others are great too, but those are the two I’ve read and can definitely recommend.

      • etana
      • 8 years ago

      I’d also recommend Perdido Street Station. Not often you have romantic scenes with phrases like: “her head legs quivered”

    • David
    • 8 years ago

    Any Joe Haldeman for some quick reads. “Forever War” is my favorite.

    You won’t find it on the Kindle store, but if you don’t mind flipping through dead trees Michael Moorcocks sci-fi is great. Otherwise, grab some Elric books from the kindle store.

    Oh! “Reamde” by Neal Stephenson. Or anything by Neal Stephenson for that matter. “Snowcrash” is probably the shortest of his novels.

    “Slaughter-house Five” by Kurt Vonnegut is great. I haven’t read anything else, but all his stuff is supposed to be great if you like dark humor.

    The first three Mass Effect books are decent and I recommend them if you like the games.

      • trackerben
      • 8 years ago

      Also Joe Haldeman’s “All My Sins Remembered”, the tragic story of an angst-ridden Buddhist assassin fighting for a future sapient-rights-championing space confederation.

    • dpaus
    • 8 years ago

    Shameless plug for a friend of mine, Robert J. Sawyer – best known as the author of “FlashForward” (which the one-season TV series was loosely based on), but my favourite of his by far is ‘Factoring Humanity’. I think most people on here would love virtually any of his books, though, and would probably especially enjoy his ‘WWW’ trilogy (3 volumes: Wake, Watch and Wonder)

    • NeelyCam
    • 8 years ago

    I don’t have time to read books anymore. Watching a movie is more time efficient than reading a book..

      • Yeats
      • 8 years ago

      Mmm, troll house cookies, yum!

        • dpaus
        • 8 years ago

        With sprinkles!

    • Voldenuit
    • 8 years ago

    Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Eriksen.

    • prb123
    • 8 years ago

    “Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption” by Laura Hillenbrand is a true story that reads like fiction.

    • sydbot
    • 8 years ago

    I was “reading” Mass Effect 3 with my eyes and ears and the ending was pretty bad. They made the people who wrote Lost (which the end I rather enjoyed) look like Oscar-winning rocket scientists from the future. Anyone else?

    As for books, I’ve been working on the 3rd book in the John Carter series for a while. I would suggest A Princess of Mars to all.

    • lonhc3
    • 8 years ago

    I have been reading the Star Wars novels as of late. Started with the lost tribe of the sith, (free on amazon) 1-8 short stories, keeps you interested, but then read the Darth Bane Triology, wow that is a good read. Finished the Dark Tower series from a few years back from King was very good also, I have also heard good things about the Foundation series…

    Good reading!

    • njsutorius
    • 8 years ago

    I just finished the hunger game series. that was a nice read.

    I would recommend the Posleen war series by John ringo. Its military sci-fi humans kick ass and get their ass kicked kind of thing. You crush a book in a day.

    Just started the Dune series.. I guess ill see what all the humbug is about.

    • Yeats
    • 8 years ago

    I’ll recommend anything by Stephen R. Donaldson. I know, I know, fantasy & scifi stuff, but what’s going on inside the characters is usually more important than what’s happening outside. Also, his “The Man Who…” series is pretty fun in an old-school mystery sort of way.

    • thanatos355
    • 8 years ago

    I would like to recommend (besides what I have already commented on) the following.

    “The Wheel of Time” series by Robert Jordan

    “The Sword of Truth” series by Terry Goodkind

    The “Honor Harrington” series by David Weber

    The “Merry Gentry” series by Laurell K. Hamilton

    The “Hammer’s Slammers” series by David Drake

    “Burning Bright” and “Trouble and Her Friends” by Melissa Scott

    The “Familias Regnant” series by Elizabeth Moon

    As you can see, I read a ton of Fantasy and Sci-Fi.

    “When Thunder Rolled: An F-105 Pilot over North Vietnam” by Ed Rasimus, is a damn good non-fiction read.

    I know I have left a ton of worthy books and authors off of this list, but I read incessantly and it’s hard to remember everything at one go. Please forgive me.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 8 years ago

      I couldn’t take Wheel of Time after I think the 4th book, when Jordon just started having everything happen between books.

        • bthylafh
        • 8 years ago

        It picked up quite a bit after Sanderson took over. The first couple of his (incl. the one where Jordan wrote part & then he finished it) were a lot better than the previous few. Lots more action, no new threads. Much closer to the original three books.

      • Blur99
      • 8 years ago

      What are your best novels that you haveread?
      …Authors?

      • hiro_pro
      • 8 years ago

      +1 for hammers slammers. a guilty pleasure from college. how i miss good old fashion military violence.

      • trackerben
      • 8 years ago

      “Honor Harrington” is a great character-driven series for the few who appreciate the Napoleonic era, strategy of technology, and military hard SF all in one.

      Weber’s other good hard SF works are the “Fifth Imperium” or “Dahak” series, on human origins and irredentist destiny in the face of alien preemptive genocide. There’s also the “Empire of Man” or “March” series he co-authored with John Ringo, basically a space operatic retelling of Xenephon’s Ten Thousand, one of the greatest expeditions of history. There are new additions to his and Steve White’s popular “Starfire” series (the definitive “invasion of carnivorous alien bugs” story), “Exodus” and “In Extremis”.

      Edit: corrected the series names and authors to “canonical” ones. Also, don’t miss Weber’s rip-roaring “Path of the Fury” series.

    • BIF
    • 8 years ago

    I enjoy the Robert B. Parker books. Brief, averaging only about 170 pages.

    For fantasy, Anne McCaffrey’s Dragonrider series. That would make an exciting movie trilogy.

    • dashbarron
    • 8 years ago

    How about a fiction with twangs of fantasy?

    Try Life Expectancy and the Frankenstein series by Dean Koontz. You should probably stop after those though.

    Oh. Some of James Rollin’s work (series) have the same feel. The mystic/legend/mythological stuff is great.

    • merkill
    • 8 years ago

    i recommend Alastair Reynolds pushing ice

      • Stargazer
      • 8 years ago

      If you like Pushing Ice, you might also be interested in the Rama series by Arthur C. Clarke / Gentry Lee. Pushing Ice reminded me of the later books in that series (the first book (by only ACC) is a bit different though).

    • normalicy
    • 8 years ago

    Seriously, nobody’s mentioned Daemon (and Freedom the sequel) by Daniel Suarez yet? Epic stuff. Most of the other stuff I like has been mentioned already.

    • clone
    • 8 years ago

    StarCraft Liberties Crusade…. it’s less than 400 pages.

    Game of Thrones series… it’s far more than 400 pages.

      • thanatos355
      • 8 years ago

      Couldn’t agree more about the “A Song of Ice and Fire” series. Can’t wait for the next novel.

        • demani
        • 8 years ago

        I know- in fact That has been the worst part: I just read all five books and now have to wait who knows how long before finishing. Stick to completed series so you don’t have to endure that frustration.

          • clone
          • 8 years ago

          I agree, more to it why is it taking as long as 5 years to write a book.

          I like the series but it’s overlong and been dragging.

          I’m into the 4th book and already dreading the wait, I read two trilogies 2 years ago one was finished and the other I was stuck waiting for 2 years to finally finish….. really annoying.

          a friend introduced me to A Game Of Thrones and my first question was “is it finished?”

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 8 years ago

            “I like the series but it’s overlong and been dragging.”

            I was going to strongly disagree with this, then I remembered the 4th book. Yeah, no one cares about Cersei that much. Don’t worry it picks up a lot in the 5th book.

            I still don’t agree that it’s overlong. I could read anything Martin has to write, and the longer the better.

            Apparently however, he was getting burnt out writing it all which is why it was taking so long. I’ve heard that when he saw the TV series being produced it rejuvenated him.

    • albundy
    • 8 years ago

    I only read and recommend books that are non-fiction. Fictional literature doesnt really leave you with anything but money out of your pocket.

    The latest read that I highly recommend is The Millionaire Fastlane by DeMarco. The read is quite worth its price ten fold, and not what you think its about.

      • clone
      • 8 years ago

      I read 50 / 50 fiction and non fiction, what leaves me with money out of my pocket is my lead foot as it forces me to fill my car more often than I need to at $70 a fill, the $5.99 spent on a book that gives me 5 hours of joy…. a far better deal than the $10 I spent on lunch that I shat into the toilet 8 hours later.

        • BIF
        • 8 years ago

        +1 for creativity!

          • clone
          • 8 years ago

          lol thx.

      • Yeats
      • 8 years ago

      [quote<]I only read and recommend books that are non-fiction. Fictional literature doesnt really leave you with anything but money out of your pocket.[/quote<] I think that says more about you than it does about the genre.

    • Elohim
    • 8 years ago

    For a change from fantasy I would highly recommend “The Lost Fleet” series by Jack Campbell (pen name). There are 5 books in the original set and he is writing a second set. Very good space opera.

    If you have not yet read “The Name of the Wind” and “Wise Man’s Fear” by Patrick Rothfuss, you’ve missed out on some excellent fantasy. Even if you are tired of fantasy I think you will enjoy those reads.

    And finally, can’t forget some of the old classics. Try Heinlein’s, “The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress” if you have not already. His “Citizen of the Galaxy” is also pretty good, as is “Starship Troopers”, which is nothing like the movie, the book is way better.

      • mesyn191
      • 8 years ago

      “The Lost Fleet” series isn’t bad but is kinda formulaic. Still if you’re looking for something to satisfy your space opera fix while waiting for Weber to deliver another book than they’re good filler.

      • thanatos355
      • 8 years ago

      Couldn’t agree more, Elohim. Every bit of it is damn good reading.

      I would recommend just about all of Heinlein’s work though, especially “To Sail Beyond the Sunset”.

      • nanoflower
      • 8 years ago

      If you are going that route I can recommend working your way through the Hugo Award Winners [url<]http://www.thehugoawards.org/hugo-history/[/url<] . Going through that list you will find many excellent books (and you can pick and choose which topics are to your taste. ) You could also add on the Nebula award winners to get more choices. For my own personal choices I would suggest anything by Vernor Vinge, Peter F. Hamilton, Ian Banks or Neal Stephenson. Each of them has put out some excellent books.

      • trackerben
      • 8 years ago

      I would read anything military-oriented by Campbell aka Hemry. He was a Navy surface warfare guy, he apparently has expertise in the time-driven tactics of distributed forces fighting jointly across hundreds of cubic miles of terrestial and atmospheric battlespace. He served some time afloat and got to know the ropes, and it shows in his wartime portrayal of military personal dynamics and code of honor.

      Other authors with military chops are David Drake whose “Hammer’s Slammers” are a toast to armored cavalrymen, Jerry Pournelle with his “CoDominium” (with Larry Niven) and “Janissaries” (with Roland Green) hard-SF series, and John Ringo with his Legacy of Aldenata series of “unstoppable alien barbarian hordes”.

      Edit: corrected series and author names to canonical ones

    • Aloeus
    • 8 years ago

    Patrick O’Brian’s Aubrey/Maturin series, very good books on the Napoleonic wars…although there sure are a lot of em

    • MadManOriginal
    • 8 years ago

    Steven King’s Gunslinger series is pretty good. Not what most think of when they hear the author – no scary monsters per se – but pretty twisted in it’s own ways.

      • thanatos355
      • 8 years ago

      I just (last night) finished this series.

      It’s actually called “The Dark Tower” series, though it’s known equally well by both titles.

      [url<]http://www.stephenking.com/DarkTower/[/url<] It's a pretty good read. I didn't love it, but I didn't stop halfway through the first book either. It had parts that I loved, moments I loved, and it had monsters aplenty. I laughed, I cried, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 8 years ago

        True, I suppose it does have monsters, just of a different sort than the old-school plain horror of early King which is why I wrote ‘per se.’ There are some of plain-jane horror monsters but most of them are more than that, they have depth. Then again it’s been a while since I read it.

      • Yeats
      • 8 years ago

      I enjoyed it a bunch. Next month (I think) King’s releasing another DT book, “The Wind Through the Keyhole”. It will be interesting to see if it’s just an SK money-grab or if it actually contributes to the DT canon.

        • thanatos355
        • 8 years ago

        According to what I’ve read about it, it’s supposed to be a collection of short stories. A “modern fairy tale” type collection.

        I honestly have trouble picturing something like that contributing to the whole.

      • lilbuddhaman
      • 8 years ago

      The gunslinger alone is a huge tease, explaining nothing asking a million questions.

    • burntham77
    • 8 years ago

    I went on a Gaiman kick for a few months. Good Omens, American Gods and Neverwhere were my favorites, especially American Gods. All great reads and all of them different.

    • burntham77
    • 8 years ago
    • theonespork
    • 8 years ago

    Steel Beach by John Varley. Multiple genres tossed in a blender, prescient social commentary, an emotional core that rings absolutely true, fantastic dialogue, and a story that is playful, surprising, and never dull. It is not the greatest piece of genre literature ever, but it ranks as an absolute favorite. It is also a great pre-screener for friends. Some are so completely turned off by the social aspects of the story that I know acquaintance is as far as we are gonna make it.

      • thanatos355
      • 8 years ago

      Steel Beach is another novel that I love and first read in my miss-spent youth.

      I love books that make you think. That encourage you to explore what “normal” and “right” really mean.

      Excellent recommendation, spork

    • LoneWolf15
    • 8 years ago

    Just finished the third of the late Steig Larsson’s trilogy – “The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet’s Nest”.
    These take a bit to get into, but if you like to read, you’ll get sucked in.

    A friend just got me into Lee Child’s novels based around his character Jack Reacher, a retired-MP-turned-nomadic wanderer. They are great reads for those of you who like a mystery, I can’t put them down. Ordered 8-10 of them used from an Amazon storefront last week; I’m finding they provide a great break from the techie-side of my life.

    • DrD
    • 8 years ago

    If you haven’t tried Haruki Murakami, do so. “Kafka on the shore”, The wind up bird chronicle” or “South of the border, west of the sun”. All his novels are great. Beautifully written and challanging stories. Nobel prize for liturature quality.

    If you want to bend you brain a bit “The elegant universe” by Brian Greene. Physics for the masses.

    Classic fantasy, “The book of the new sun” by Gene Wolfe. Comparable in depth and scope to Tolkien.

    “The Impossible Dead” by Ian Rankin, a good detective novel.

      • pragma
      • 8 years ago

      Seconded. Murakami is great. Such economy and expressiveness! A single sentence to convey more than a full paragraph by some lesser writer.

      Gene Wolfe is excellent too, though a somewhat difficult read. New Sun will benefit from good reading rhythm, and at the same time, a comprehensive dictionary to assist with his vocabulary of obscure words? “The Fifth Head of Cerberus” reads easy, but the story is a mindfu.ck!

    • mesyn191
    • 8 years ago

    SciFi:
    -Anything by CJ Cherryh in her Forgiener series which is something like 12 books long IIRC.
    -Vernor Vinge does some fantastic far reaching “hard” scifi.
    -Neal Asher is great if you love world building and then blowing those worlds up spectacularly in spaaaace.
    -John Scalzi’s stuff is probably best known for his war in space dramas like “Old Man’s War” but he does other fun SciFi setting things as well. “Agent to the Stars” and “Fuzzy Nation” are books that I haven’t seen anyone able to put down once they start.

    Urban Fantasy:
    -Jim Butcher is unbeatably good here. His dialog and editing could use a little work but the story and characters are so good you won’t care. Some fan service but its at a minimum. Also you have to read the Codex Alera series if only to see how he can take idea as silly as “pokemon + roman-esque society + Zerg + borg” and make it come out good.
    -Patricia Briggs’ stuff varies between decent and good, a little formulaic and unfortunately has a decent amount of fan service, but supposedly that is required by nearly any publisher these days in this genre.
    -Wen Spencer’s “Tinker” and the follow up are her 2 only really good books IMO but they’re awesome even with the fan service. She also did some “alternate reality role reversal bodice ripper” type stuff in “A Brother’s Price” which was bizzarely good.

      • thanatos355
      • 8 years ago

      I cannot thank you enough for introducing me to John Scalzi’s work!

      I was looking for something to read, since I just finished “The Dark Tower” series. Having read that “Old Man’s War” was similar to Starship Troopers (which I absolutely adore), I decided to give it a go.

      I could NOT put it down. Oh jeez! I think I read 6hrs straight when I first opened it up. I love military sci-fi and I love first person narratives. This novel (and I have hopes for the rest of his work too) is just absolute bliss for someone like me.

      Thanks again. πŸ™‚

        • willmore
        • 8 years ago

        Then you might like the Honor series by Webber. Lost of books in that series.

          • thanatos355
          • 8 years ago

          It’s one of my all time favorite series. <3

          Those books are like crack to me. :’-D

    • Aspleme
    • 8 years ago

    Okay, I skimmed over the previous topic, but I didn’t feel like reading everything in its entirety.

    I see that Modesitt Jr’s Recluce books were mentioned, but I didn’t notice his science fiction novels mentioned. Almost anything he’s written is good, but I find myself rereading Gravity Dreams, Octagonal Raven, and Flash every few years. I think I want to reread his Spellsong Saga again…

    The Pern series is pretty good, though I find I don’t enjoy Todd’s books like I did his mother’s.

    Orson Scott Card is another amazing author, with almost everything he touches coming out golden.

    Terry Pratchet was mentioned, but I didn’t notice any recommendations for Piers Anthony… who rivals Frank Herbert and Robert Jordan in his ability to create epic scope.

    Christopher Stasheff created a few interesting series if you can get a hold of them.

    Stephen Baxter has some amazing science fiction novels.

    Kelly McCullough has a rather interesting series, Webmage, that combines magic, myth, and computer programming.

    I’d also recommend Nick Sagan’s Idlewild series, especially if you enjoyed the first Matrix movie.

    Peter David is another enjoyable author with an amusing sense of humor.

      • mesyn191
      • 8 years ago

      The “Pern” series was something I read constantly in middle school and when I was younger. It doesn’t hold up so well anymore unfortunately reading it again as an adult but for Young Adults or someone who has never read it before looking for some good to decent books I think its great. Same goes for Piers Anthony.

      OSC’s “Ender” books were really good too, kind’ve shocked there hasn’t been a movie done on them yet, though I guess the subject matter (ie. training little kids to be genocidal killers) is hard to do in Hollywood.

      Thanks for the other recommendations too BTW.

      • thanatos355
      • 8 years ago

      Peter David writes the only Star Trek novels that I can stomach reading. Love me some M’k’n’zy.

      Great suggestions.

    • JJCDAD
    • 8 years ago

    “The Pillars of the Earth” by Ken Follett

      • cfroese
      • 8 years ago

      I second that. Great read.

      I also just finished “Fall of Giants” by Ken Follett. Great story again with his usual blend of fact and fiction. Now I just have to wait until Sept for the second book of the trilogy to come out.

      • Mourmain
      • 8 years ago

      Reading it right now. After having finished the Song of Ice and Fire series, this one feels very amateurish in style in comparison, even if the overall story is nice.

      • dpaus
      • 8 years ago

      One of the books I have gone back to read multiple times – highly recommended.

    • yogibbear
    • 8 years ago

    Haruki Murakami – Hard Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World
    Kurt Vonnegut – Slaughterhouse Five
    Chuck Palahniuk – Choke

    • spigzone
    • 8 years ago

    Three EXCEPTIONALLY entertaining books, if your haven’t read them yet:

    1. Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson
    2. Little Big Man by Thomas Berger
    3. Catch 22 by Joseph Heller

    • The Dark One
    • 8 years ago

    I recommend the [i<]The Dig[/i<], the novelization of the mid-90s LucasArts adventure game.

    • Stargazer
    • 8 years ago

    I can recommend the Revelation Space “series” by Alastair Reynolds. Hard Sci-Fi/Space Opera with nice story.

      • eofpi
      • 8 years ago

      I second this recommendation.

      I also nominate William Gibson’s Sprawl trilogy (Neuromancer, Count Zero, and Mona Lisa Overdrive), if you haven’t read them yet.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 8 years ago

      I’m having trouble imagining how a space opera works with “hard” sci-fi.

        • eofpi
        • 8 years ago

        Reynolds is an astronomer who worked for the ESA until his writing career took off. He tries to keep the story within the bounds of what he believes to be physically possible, which seems to be more restrictive than my geeky layman’s mind.

        I could explain how that basis interacts with the characters to make it space opera, but, at this hour, it’d be spoilerful. You should just pick up Revelation Space and see for yourself. Bear in mind, though, that it takes about 50 pages to really get going.

        • Stargazer
        • 8 years ago

        Try it and find out. πŸ™‚

        In my opinion, it works.

    • Blur99
    • 8 years ago

    Here are some recent books that I have read or reading.

    “The Worst Journey in the World” by Cherry-Garrard. True story of South Pole expedition.
    “The Complete Short Novels” of Anton Checkov
    ” The Crusades: The Authoritative History of the War for the Holy Land” by Thomas Asbridge
    “A Bend in the River” VS Naipaul
    “In a Free State” by VS Naipaul. Naipaul is thought to be the best English language writer in the world.

    Anyone read or heard about Naipaul?

      • mcnabney
      • 8 years ago

      VS Naipaul – “seventh on their list of ‘the 50 greatest British writers since 1945′” – so not the best in the world. He is quite good though.

        • Blur99
        • 8 years ago

        According to many places in his own time he is the best.
        I saw that Times list. It is hard to compare writers. The Guardian (UK) is one place that says he is the best.

          • smilingcrow
          • 8 years ago

          There is no best writer, actor, musician etc as it’s purely subjective. My favourite musician for example is Miles Davis; although his autobiography puts him low on my list of favourite writers/ghost writers. Enjoy what you like and share but don’t tarnish it by using the word best as it has as much significance as the best selling charts do.

    • bthylafh
    • 8 years ago

    I’m nearly done with the first book of Shelby Foote’s trilogy on the Civil War. It’s rather good.

    Be sure to check out the Baen Free Library, which has several fairly current books published by Baen, the idea being to expose you to new authors and series. Their e-books also tend to be cheaper than other publishers’.

    Amazon’s got the Hunger Games trilogy for sale for ~$15 for the whole set. It’s a steal at that price.

    PS: it’s kind of sad that you can’t have a discussion of Apple hardware without nerds raging enough to make it unworthwhile.

      • ImSpartacus
      • 8 years ago

      *gag* Use your local public library. Your taxes already pay for it.

      When I want a book or CD and my library doesn’t have it, [i<]I just ask them to get it[/i<]. They haven't said turned me down yet. They have a kickass graphic novel section too. Libraries are so damn underrated...

        • Blur99
        • 8 years ago

        I would ask my library to “get” a book I want but my library sucks despite being a central branch.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 years ago

        it really depends on where you live.

        • indeego
        • 8 years ago

        Public libraries now use DRM “rental” schemes from private companies that limit the amount of “books” that patrons can take out.

        Horrible use of public funds IMO and a real downer even when you try and use. I tried to get I, Robot for my kids and the wait was 4 weeks for someone to “return” it so I could “check it out.”

        Still use brick and Mortar libraries, but honestly it’s getting less and less…

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 8 years ago

          You know, there might be some side benefit to not being instantly gratified and having to wait occasionally.

          Edit: Also, our local library supports digital borrowing on Kindles and other devices.

        • TurtlePerson2
        • 8 years ago

        +1 for using your local library. My library has a DVD selection that rivals Netflix. As the OP says, if they don’t have something then they’ll either buy it or get it from another library in the state.

        The truth is that despite the fact I get 80 movies from the library each year, it would still be cheaper to pay the rental cost or subscribe to Netflix. The taxes paid to the library make me wonder what exactly they’re up to. I think I’m a heavy user, but I don’t really get my money’s worth.

          • BIF
          • 8 years ago

          Yep, my county library has more music CDs than any stores but Virgin Megastores.

          Oh and the temptation to rip them to my iTunes library…that is very strong!

          • ImSpartacus
          • 8 years ago

          Try looking into the CD collection and public programs. Even if you don’t touch a single book, a few DVDs and CDs a week along with the occasional magazine or newspaper can almost cover your taxes.

          But if your library has cool programs, you might be able to find seriously good entertainment for almost no extra cost.

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