Rumor: HP to merge PC and printer divisions

Just seven months ago ago, HP was making preparations to get rid of its PC business. That move was eventually canceled, and now, chatter around the web suggests HP’s PC business is about to become more ensconced than ever within the company.

AllThingsD has heard from “sources familiar with the matter” that HP will soon combine its PC and printer businesses as part of a “sweeping reorganization.” The Imaging and Printing Group and Personal Systems Group will become one, and the combined entity will “report to” Executive VP Todd Bradley, the man currently in charge of HP’s PC division. Vyomesh Joshi, who heads the printer division, will depart HP.

Cost-cutting is reportedly one of the driving forces behind the move, but word is that HP also sees some integration opportunities. AllThingsD explains, “The plan is to have their line of business more readily integrated so they can approach customers together and with unified product offerings.”

PCs with built-in printers? Laptops that run on printer ink? The possibilities are endless.

Update: HP has officially announced the move.

Comments closed
    • Palek
    • 8 years ago

    I envision a “synergistic” HP printer + PC division where HP computers “expire” much like HP ink and print heads. *shivers*

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 8 years ago

    God, 2 years ago I would have told you HP was on its way to conquering the world. Now it seems just so inconsistent. They still put out some interesting/good products but its hard to see how they’ll compete against apple, microsoft, dell, acer, asus, etc with the rest really pushing forward while HP treads water.

    • dpaus
    • 8 years ago

    Let’s keep this in perspective: the PC and Printer divisions were originally one division, it was CEO Mark Hurd who split them 4 (?) years ago. And then his replacement, Leo Appocalypse, who killed everything hardware. Meg’s just undoing the damage, all as part of her attempt to re-introduce ‘the HP way’.

    I wish her luck (no, sincerely).

      • Scrotos
      • 8 years ago

      I see this as also helping to mask the thin margins on the PC business. Their printer division is making bank, ain’t it? Would probably give overall better numbers to the investors or whatnot.

      • Geistbar
      • 8 years ago

      Glad to see someone look at this reasonably. As you said, this is just an internal organizational change. No one is going to start gluing PCs and printers because of this change (they might have done it anyway, who knows, but this isn’t being done to enable that). They see the business of selling PCs and selling printers entwined enough that it is preferable to have just one person managing that instead of two.

      I don’t see any huge revelation here, except possibly that HP leadership is at least trying.

        • dpaus
        • 8 years ago

        [quote<]I don't see any huge revelation here, except possibly that HP leadership is at least trying[/quote<] Bingo, help yourself to some jellybeans. If we must turn this into chicken entrails and tea leaves, then consider what this means for the now-Open-Source WebOS, which had it's hardware abstraction layer published yesterday, and can now be run on the new Linux kernal. I'm willing to bet a beer or two that we'll see WebOS as the [on-device + network-accessible] user interface for mid- to high-end HP printers in 2013, if not sooner.

      • Cuhulin
      • 8 years ago

      Actually, the PC and Printer divisions were separate for most of their history.

      Carly Fiorina brought them together.

      Mark Hurd then separated them.

      Now Meg Whitman wants to follow in the footsteps of Carly Fiorina.

    • dashbarron
    • 8 years ago

    Ah…so their PCs will now take 20 minutes to calibrate everytime I want to print, the network connectivity will sporadically drop off when I’m in a hurry, and all the drivers will have to be reinstalled everytime I want to scan.

    Well, at least their PCs will remain bloatware free.

      • sweatshopking
      • 8 years ago

      at least they don’t run lexmark drivers. I’ll stick to hp just for that reason! lexmark is the worst!

        • riviera74
        • 8 years ago

        Forget Lexmark and HP. Try Epson instead… unless you want a laser, then go Okidata.

          • Scrotos
          • 8 years ago

          I like most HP lasers. Any inkjet is crap. I know HP had a few rough laser models, too, but the 20-ish or so in our printer fleet are pretty good.

          I don’t see many businesses ditching HP or Xerox or Canon for Oki. I know you’re thinking more consumer-level stuff and inkjets, but I think businesses probably do more volume and buy stuff with higher margins.

            • riviera74
            • 8 years ago

            For business, I would have to agree. All I have seen are HP lasers for at least 20 years or more. There are a few others (a Lexmark here, a Canon AIO there) out there.

            Consumer level though, I still despise HP drivers because of their insistence that they devour resources like there is no tomorrow. Their consumer-level printers I have no problems with at all.

            • Deanjo
            • 8 years ago

            [quote<]Any inkjet is crap.[/quote<] Even though they both print and people try to use one or the other, they really serve two different uses. Inkjets still offer the superior photo reproduction. With the prices of both now days there really isn't any reason not to have both. Laser for day to day printing and if you are into digital photography and such a good inkjet (even $100 inkjets do a remarkable job creating photos now).

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 8 years ago

    Printers and PC’s… two devices on the way out.

    In a world filled with tablets, paper becomes optional and PC’s become optional. HP sees it. So they put them together into the Optional Department. Run by the Optional guy who almost got optional’ed.

      • Krogoth
      • 8 years ago

      What are you drinking?

      Desktop PCs and printers are not going away. There are a number of places where hard copies of documentation are required.

      Tablets are not replacing anything. They are saturating an untapped market.

      The future of computing is “combine arms” where you have a array of form factors working together. They all exploit their strengths and minimizing their weaknesses.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 years ago

        As much as it pains me, +1. :p

        • yogibbear
        • 8 years ago

        Our ammonium filled “blue” documents started leaching out the ammonium and now rats are eating them… so… even when we lose power we still lose all access to documentation………

        • faramir
        • 8 years ago

        They are saturating the toy market … away go model trains, RC airplanes, LEGO and other toys for boys and in come tablets, at least for the first few days before the charm of novely wears off.

          • NeelyCam
          • 8 years ago

          LEGOs will [i<]never[/i<] go away.

            • Palek
            • 8 years ago

            I would give you 100 +s if I could. LEGOs are the best toys ever.

        • paulWTAMU
        • 8 years ago

        It sucks but Sarbanes-Oxley probably means we’ll have printers for a long, long time. Freaking paperwork requirements

      • The Egg
      • 8 years ago

      You’ve obviously never had a job in a real-world office setting. Tablets are just a toy for jacking around.

        • sweatshopking
        • 8 years ago

        “jacking around” yeah, that’s what they’re for. all the boys take them to their bedrooms with wifi access to “jack around”

      • riviera74
      • 8 years ago

      Sorry. Tablets are for content consumption. PCs and Printers are meant for content creation. Tablets are optional, not PCs or printers.

      Can you do a full-room presentation off of a tablet? Uh, NO! PC still required.

        • FakeAlGore
        • 8 years ago

        I’m not arguing that traditional PCs are no longer required, but I do feel the need to correct you on one point.

        With an [url=http://store.apple.com/us/product/MC552ZM/B<]Apple VGA adapter[/url<] and [url=http://www.apple.com/apps/keynote/<]Keynote for iOS[/url<] it is quite trivial to do a full-room presentation off of a tablet.

          • riviera74
          • 8 years ago

          I had no idea that could be done. I stand corrected.

          One question: can you create a presentation off of a tablet? I still doubt that.

            • FakeAlGore
            • 8 years ago

            You certainly can, but it’s a bit awkward. I’d currently recommend against it.

        • dpaus
        • 8 years ago

        [quote<]Can you do a full-room presentation off of a tablet? Uh, NO![/quote<] Damn, I'd better let our sales team know; they've been doing two or three a week for a few months now.

          • MadManOriginal
          • 8 years ago

          It’s clear from his post that he should have said something like ‘create a full-room presentation on a tablet.’ Yes, it can be done, but do your sales team people create presentations on tablets, or just use them to display the presentation?

            • dpaus
            • 8 years ago

            They’ll customize a stock presentation for a client, perhaps make a few modifications, but other than that, they use a PC to create the presentations.

            I, on the other hand, have several ‘presentations’ (really more like study notes for research projects that I’m working on) that I both create and watch on a tablet (I mostly use QuickOffice and either my Playbook or my Touchpad)

      • Deanjo
      • 8 years ago

      I see you are still reading those “paperless world” articles from the 1980’s PC magazines and still holding out hope. That’s OK, I keep hoping for the flying cars that were “just around the corner” that were featured in my 1960s Popular Mechanics.

    • yogibbear
    • 8 years ago

    I don’t see much integration.

    Unless HP sees PC’s as an appliance… then maybe.

      • Cuhulin
      • 8 years ago

      This is an internal battle between Bradley and Vijay. Guess who won?

    • Ryhadar
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]PCs with built-in printers?[/quote<] Hah, this was my first thought when I read the headline in the shortbread.

      • Peldor
      • 8 years ago

      It’s high time the all-in-one printer got mashed into the all-in-one PC. Just one question: Does the paper feed in the top of the CPU and the mouse plug into the scanner or the other way round?

        • dpaus
        • 8 years ago

        Laugh all you want; if HP offered a business laptop with a dockable inkjet printer, I’d buy them for my sales reps.

          • Scrotos
          • 8 years ago

          Really? We migrated them to tablets in part so they couldn’t store confidential info on their easily-stolen mobile devices. Letting them print off that stuff more easily seems like a recipe for disaster.

          I suppose it depends on the industry, but yeah, not a great fit for us. It was tried in the past with portable inkjets because they complained they wanted them (back when they had “heavy” laptops) but the inkjets were too heavy for them to carry. Still got ’em sitting in a closet. Good times.

            • dpaus
            • 8 years ago

            No, they don’t store the costing sheet on the tablet/laptop, but they access it via web, do the merge into a standard quote document, and then want to print that off on ‘official’ letterhead, etc.

            • Thatguy
            • 8 years ago

            +1 because nothing you said deserves a -1.

            Now, I’m assuming its the software that limits all of the tablets and not the hardware for your sales reps. As far as i know you can easily hook up a k/b and mouse combo to any tablet with a Bluetooth signal?

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