Deal of the week: A 60GB SSD for $55 and a PSU for $24

We’ve got a couple of pretty juicy deals for you all this week. The first is OCZ’s Agility 3 60GB solid-state drive, which is on sale for a scant $54.99 after a $10 mail-in rebate—and that’s with free shipping. The drive features SandForce’s SF-2281 controller and can hit top read and write speeds of 525MB/s and 475MB/s, respectively. It also has a three-year warranty.

Next up is Antec’s High Current Gamer Series 400W power supply. The unit is listed for $74.99, but Newegg lets you shave off 15% with a promo code (EMCNEJN33), and you can take off another $40 with a mail-in rebate. If you actually get that rebate check in the mail, you’ll wind up paying only $23.74 for this PSU—a pretty solid bargain, considering this is an 80 Plus Bronze-certified unit with 30 amps of 12V power and a 135-mm ball-bearing fan. Warranty coverage is three years, as well.

If you happen to live north of the border, NCIX’s Mother’s Day Sale is worth a look, too. You can nab a 128GB OCZ Octane SSD for just $99.99 CAD after a $20 mail-in rebate and a 240GB OCZ Agility 3 for $199.99 CAD after a $20 mail-in rebate.

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    • Lazier_Said
    • 8 years ago

    I bought two Seasonic S12-500 supplies on Ebay tonight for $15 each. The same ones which were selling for $150 6 years ago.

    All of the depreciation of a CPU without most of functional obsolescence.

    Seller had a couple left, last I looked.

      • Bensam123
      • 8 years ago

      New? I wouldn’t buy a used PSU like I wouldn’t buy a used HD (unless it’s under warranty). Power supplies do age and breakdown.

    • flip-mode
    • 8 years ago

    120 GB or go home. 60 GB is too small.

    You can get a SanDisk 120 GB drive for $100, no rebates, shipped free:
    [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820171545[/url<] and there's a Mushkin 120 GB drive for just $3 more. Both of those offer a more practical capacity, better GB/$, and don't involve rebates. Neither of them boast the same 525MB/s speed, but I honestly do not think I would be able to notice.

      • ALiLPinkMonster
      • 8 years ago

      Yeah I’ve been looking at the Mushkin for my build. It gets great reviews and it doesn’t seem to have as many issues as some of the other drives.

        • Deanjo
        • 8 years ago

        Don’t bother with the non-DX mushkin drives. They use asynchronous NAND vs the Deluxe models synchronous NAND and the performance takes a nose dive because of it.

        [url<]http://www.overclockersclub.com/reviews/mushkin_chronos/13.htm[/url<] [quote<] I was slightly disappointed by the performance offered by the Mushkin Chronos. While it was definitely faster than a mechanical drive, it had trouble keeping up with other drives utilizing a SF-2281 controller. In some ways this performance difference should have been expected, after all the density of the NAND flash is lower driving performance to a lower level. [/quote<]

      • Sunburn74
      • 8 years ago

      60gb is a good size for PS3s, htpcs, netbooks, etc. I’ve wanted to put a SSD in my ps3 but feel weird putting a 128gb drive to waste in that regard, yet the price of most 60gb drives is too prohibitive.

        • NeelyCam
        • 8 years ago

        Hmm… ssd for ps3? I have a spare 80gig… do i lose all my game saves if I switch the drive?

          • JustAnEngineer
          • 8 years ago

          Sony made it very easy to upgrade the hard-drive in your PlayStation 3:

          Plug in a large USB memory stick (I had a 16 GB unit).
          Use the backup utility to save your saved games and downloaded software to the memory stick.
          Turn off the PS3 and replace the hard-drive.
          When you turn it back on, it will automatically prompt you to download and install the system software.
          Insert your USB memory stick and restore your data.

          I put a 128 GB SSD and a 750 GB hard-drive in my laptop and moved the original 320 GB 7200 rpm hard-drive from the laptop to the PS3 (replacing its 5400 rpm 80 GB drive).

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 8 years ago

            Would there be a point to put an SSD in a PS3?

            My understanding is that most of the games are hardcoded to expect read and write times for a 5400 RPM HDD anyways.

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            If my game saves and level loads on Skyrim get faster, I’ll be happy

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            Fantastic – thanks! +1

            I’m working on it right now. My 16GB USB wasn’t big enough; had to delete some stuff. But it’s restoring from backup (10min remaining).. I hope I haven’t forgotten my PSN login, though..

      • MadManOriginal
      • 8 years ago

      In real-world use the difference would not be noticable, you are correct. In non-synthetic testing even Intel drives based on their original in-house controller (X-25M and 320 series) are not that much slower than controllers a generation ahead (SF-22xx and Marvell 6GB/s Marvell 88SS9174-BLD2 in the C400 or M4). This is from reading a wide range of websites and taking them all into account.

      It is kind of funny seeing you say a Sandforce-based drive is a good buy though 🙂

        • Firestarter
        • 8 years ago

        [quote<]It is kind of funny seeing you say a Sandforce-based drive is a good buy though :)[/quote<] I'd recommend the Intel 330 Sandforce-bases drives with no qualms. They're cheap, plenty fast and have been through the Intel validation mill.

        • flip-mode
        • 8 years ago

        You may have mistaken me for a Sandforce hater, but I’m not. I’m no fan of OCZ in any way, but that’s because of their behavior and not because of their products.

    • JustAnEngineer
    • 8 years ago

    One of my favorite Antec power supplies is the EarthWatts Green EA-650. It’s rated at 54 amperes of +12 volt power. It’s a quiet PSU with an 80+ bronze rating.
    It was available for $65 (delivered) from Newegg two weeks ago, but it’s up to $71 this week.
    [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371044[/url<]

      • jensend
      • 8 years ago

      For some reason people seem to be stuck in the P4 Extreme Edition era when it comes to PSUs.

      With today’s processors, a 250W PSU is plenty if you’re just using the IGP or a mainstream card, a 350W PSU will cover practically all single-GPU setups, and there’s no reason to go over ~500W for a PSU ever. (Per Tuesday’s review, a high-end system with the GTX 690 consumes only 380W at full gaming load.)

      A PSU’s efficiency curve usually only starts to reach high efficiency at around 1/2 its rated output, and below 1/4 of its rated output the efficiency falls precipitously. Since most people’s systems will be spending most of their time in idle/lower power states (<75W) and most of the remainder of their time in relatively low power draw (<150W), their >600W 80 Plus Gold Iridium Unobtainium Plus Plus Plus power supplies will usually be lower-efficiency than a cheapo 300W unit.

      The efficiency curve of the EarthWatts PSU you cited is a little better at lower wattages than most high-wattage units, but you’d probably be better off with a lower-wattage PSU unless your PSU is also powering a breeder reactor or indoor marijuana greenhouse.

        • Airmantharp
        • 8 years ago

        You’re right of course, but I’m definitely with JAE when it comes to the quality watts/$ of that EA-650.

        You’ll never need it, I only draw 500w from my CFX and OC’d 2500k rig under max load, but for the price, the flexibility is great.

          • jensend
          • 8 years ago

          I agree that the EarthWatts PSUs are pretty decent- years ago I purchased a 380W EarthWatts to replace the aging PSU on an old P4 system and it’s worked well.

          But the 430W and 380W units are $25 and $35 cheaper than the 650W version at Newegg right now, and as I said, those will be much more suitable for the vast majority of folks.

        • rrr
        • 8 years ago

        There is a reason: SLI with higher end cards. Admittedly, few people do that, but that is a valid reason.

          • jensend
          • 8 years ago

          Did you even read my post- or any recent hardware review with SLI power figures?

          A high-end 690 setup uses 380W *at the wall* *at full load*. In other words, the DC power use, which is what the PSU is rated for, was under 350W. The corresponding DC power figures for two 7970s or two 680s are 360W and 390W. There is zero probability of ever seriously straining a 500W power supply using the highest-end cards now available in SLI, even with a high-end CPU.

          Triple-SLI would need more power but it’s absolutely pointless (vastly diminished returns) and nobody in their right mind does it.

            • rrr
            • 8 years ago

            And these are only possible to SLI cards? Have you even factored overclocking in your post? Probably not.

        • Deanjo
        • 8 years ago

        [quote<]and there's no reason to go over ~500W for a PSU ever. [/quote<] BS, some of my systems won't even power up with something that small. For example, my main rig: 1090T with water cooling 16 Gig 2133 DDR3 2 SSD's, 10 2 TB 7200 mechanicals, 1 optical GTX-580 and GTX-275 My media server might even have a hard time with it's 24 drives as well on just a 500 watt, especially if it is not a single rail design.

          • cygnus1
          • 8 years ago

          silly rabbit, very high specced workstations and big storage servers are not what anybody was talking about. the topic was power supplies for normal rigs

            • Deanjo
            • 8 years ago

            The use of “ever” negates that which means, always, at anytime, in any way.

            Also as it has been mentioned by others, a sli/crossfire/multi GPU card could also use the extra juice especially when coupled to a high wattage CPU.

        • Lazier_Said
        • 8 years ago

        SPCR recently tested 350 and 1050 watt, 80+ Gold rated Seasonic power supplies.

        At 45 and 65 watts DC output, the “precipitous” disadvantage to the high spec unit was 7 and 8 watts at the wall.

        At 90W that had shrunk to 4.

        At 200-300W it was back up to 6.

        First, that low spec 350 watt is the highest end low wattage unit on the market. Substitute a cheapo and that 7 watt lead would go away.

        Second, even if it didn’t we’re talking about all of 7 watts.

        I realize greenbeanism is the new black, but you’re making a mountain out of a molehill here.

          • jensend
          • 8 years ago

          Seasonic’s X series PSUs cost more than twice what you pay for very good PSUs from other manufacturers, and Seasonic has generally been a little more serious about doing the engineering work to make their PSUs have good efficiency curves than their competitors.

          Trying to make claims about high-wattage PSUs in general based on an extremely expensive exception from one exceptional company is pretty ridiculous.

          I’m not sweating bullets over a few wasted watts, I’m worried that the market for quality PSUs is turning into the ricer scene because people spend more money on stuff that performs [i<]worse[/i<] just because it has bigger numbers. OMG! THIS PSU SAYS 1500W, IT MUST BE 5X AS GOOD AS THE 300W ONE! AND IT COMES WITH RACING STRIPE DECALS AND A SPOILER!

        • Waco
        • 8 years ago

        BS. A 690 + ANY relatively recent CPU will pull more than 380 watts if you actually load the system down. This is especially true if the system is running a Bulldozer power-hog. My 8120, for the short time I had it, would pull 400 watts with JUST THE CPU LOADED when overclocked.

        I don’t know about you – but when I build a system I don’t want the possibility of overloading the PSU to EVER happen.

          • jensend
          • 8 years ago

          Exactly what reason do we have to believe your anecdotes over [url=https://techreport.com/articles.x/22890/9<]Damage's[/url<] [url=https://techreport.com/articles.x/21813/16<]testing[/url<]? Where's your evidence? You're calling him a liar; you'd better man up or shut up. The Sandy Bridge-E they used certainly counts as recent, and it uses more power than SB or IB. And you don't think running Skyrim with Ultra quality plus FXAA on three large monitors counts as loading the system down? Even the [url=https://techreport.com/articles.x/21848/2<]article where they took a water-cooled 8150 to a totally ridiculous way-beyond-diminishing-returns 1.55V[/url<] shows under 350W of power use under heavy CPU load. Sure, if you push the voltage on every chip in your case to the point where it's likely to cause damage and then run a power virus you can find a way of consuming 500W. Or you can run a dozen mechanical hard drives like the other poster, or you can try to run your microwave off an inverter coming from your 12V line, or do any number of other ridiculous things to find a way to use 500W. But there's no reason to do any of these things.

          • JustAnEngineer
          • 8 years ago

          The [url=http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371044<]EarthWatts Green EA-650[/url<] with its beefy 54 A @ +12 V rating is suitable for Crossfire-X / SLI configurations. The HCG-400 in the deal ($75 -11¼ = $63.74 - 40MIR) that Cyril posted can provide only 30 A @ +12 V. That's not good for Crossfire / SLI and it's a bit iffy for single high-end graphics cards. If you're looking for an inexpensive power supply for a PC with a single graphics card, I like the Antec EarthWatts Green EA-430 for [url=http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371034<]$45 -6.75 = $38.24 with no MIR)[/url<]. It's rated at 32 A on the +12 V rail.

            • rrr
            • 8 years ago

            EA-650 is inadequate for many SLI/CF configuration due to insufficient number of PCI-E connectors.

            • JustAnEngineer
            • 8 years ago

            Fair enough. I have a pile of adapters around (most of my graphics cards seem to come with them).
            [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812189120[/url<] [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812706014[/url<]

        • swaaye
        • 8 years ago

        Regarding efficiency, I’ve seen some reviews of 1kW PSUs that display ~80% efficiency at 50W (5%). So the efficiency doesn’t necessarily fall off a cliff, but it is definitely important to read reviews. I think it’s always best to find a nice review that covers component/construction quality and thorough load testing before picking a PSU.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 years ago

        Do you have any idea how big of a pain in the ass it is to wire a system with low-wattage PSU? They don’t come with enough connectors, or if they do they’re all on a single cable.

          • rrr
          • 8 years ago

          Good point, to even SLI/CF two midrange cards like, say 560Ti or 6870, you typically need 2*2 = 4 6-pin connectors. Units that have so many? Yep, 650W and up (and not even all of them, like Corsair TX650v2 has only 2.)

          • swaaye
          • 8 years ago

          This is one of those aspects you don’t know to watch for until you’ve been screwed over at least once. 😉

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 8 years ago

    Several sizes of the M4 are below $1 per GB now, and it looks like the 64GB was just cut, as well. They may run a few dollars more than Sandforce drives, but only that, which I’d consider an insurance premium of a proved controller.

      • pack66
      • 8 years ago

      After researching SSDs, I went with an M4 120gb. It’s been fantastic and with all the stuff I read about SF controllers, great piece of mind. An fast SSD that doesn’t work is just a paperweight.

        • mattthemuppet
        • 8 years ago

        ditto here. There are faster drives out there, but the reliability and decent cost made me get an M4

        • Airmantharp
        • 8 years ago

        Same here, for my new laptop.

      • rrr
      • 8 years ago

      Yep. Got one too, no problems at all.

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