Intel uncorks a plethora of new Xeons

Wow, so, Intel’s Xeon product line has just gotten substantially larger. The chipmaker has added a whopping 28 new processors to the series, but believe it or not, only 11 of them are based on the new Ivy Bridge architecture. The rest of them are, as far as I can tell, all 32-nm Sandy Bridge-E offerings.

The new arrivals belong to three distinct families. At the high end, the E5-4600 lineup is geared toward four-socket servers; it allows each system to pack as many as 32 cores and 48 memory modules. These chips, Intel says, are “ideal for a wide range of technical compute applications, such as scientific research and financial services, as well as dense four-socket solutions for communications infrastructure and rapidly growing markets such as China.”

Model Cache Cores/

threads

Clock

speed

TDP QPI

speed

Fab

process

Price
E5-4650  20 MB  8/16  2.70 GHz  130W  8.00 GT/s  32 nm $3,616
E5-4640  20 MB  8/16  2.40 GHz  95W  8.00 GT/s  32 nm $2,725
E5-4620  16 MB  8/16  2.20 GHz  95W  7.20 GT/s  32 nm $1,611
E5-4610  15 MB  6/12  2.40 GHz  95W  7.20 GT/s  32 nm $1,219
E5-4607  12 MB  6/12  2.20 GHz  95W  6.40 GT/s  32 nm $885
E5-4603  10 MB  4/8  2.00 GHz  95W  6.40 GT/s  32 nm $551
E5-4650L  20 MB  8/16  2.60 GHz  115W  8.00 GT/s  32 nm $3,616
E5-4617  15 MB  6/6  2.90 GHz  130W  7.20 GT/s  32 nm $1,611

Down the line, the Xeon E5-2400 family includes nine new processors designed to accommodate two-socket servers. These are cheaper than the E5-4600 series, with prices in the $188-1440 range. Intel says they’re a good fit for small and medium businesses.

Model Cache Cores/

threads

Clock

speed

TDP QPI

speed

Fab

process

Price
E5-2470  20 MB  8/16  2.30 GHz  95W  8.00 GT/s  32 nm $1,440
E5-2450  20 MB  8/16  2.10 GHz  95W  8.00 GT/s  32 nm $1,107
E5-2440  15 MB  6/12  2.40 GHz  95W  7.20 GT/s  32 nm $832
E5-2430  15 MB  6/12  2.20 GHz  95W  7.20 GT/s  32 nm $551
E5-2420  15 MB  6/12  1.90 GHz  95W  7.20 GT/s  32 nm $387
E5-2407  10 MB  4/4  2.20 GHz  80W  6.40 GT/s  32 nm $250
E5-2403  10 MB  4/4  1.80 GHz  80W  6.40 GT/s  32 nm $188
E5-2450L  20 MB  8/16  1.80 GHz  70W  8.00 GT/s  32 nm $1,107
E5-2430L  15 MB  6/12  2.00 GHz  60W  7.20 GT/s  32 nm $662

Last, but not least, is the Xeon E3-1200 v2 family, which is where all of the new Ivy Bridge-based models are concentrated. The 11 Xeon E3-1200 v2 processors are priced between $189 and $884, and they’re designed to power small-business servers and entry-level workstations. These are, as you might expect, all single-socket offerings. Intel claims they have “up to 32 percent greater energy efficient performance” than previous-generation E3-1200 offerings.

Model Cache Cores/

threads

Clock

speed

TDP Fab

process

Price
E3-1290v2  8 MB  4/8  3.70 GHz  87W  22 nm $885
E3-1280v2  8 MB  4/8  3.60 GHz  69W  22 nm $612
E3-1270v2  8 MB  4/8  3.50 GHz  69W  22 nm $328
E3-1240v2  8 MB  4/8  3.40 GHz  69W  22 nm $250
E3-1230v2  8 MB  4/8  3.30 GHz  69W  22 nm $215
E3-1220v2  8 MB  4/8  3.10 GHz  69W  22 nm $189
E3-1275v2  8 MB  4/8  3.50 GHz  77W  22 nm $339
E3-1245v2  8 MB  4/8  3.40 GHz  77W  22 nm $266
E3-1225v2  8 MB  4/4  3.20 GHz  77W  22 nm $209
E3-1265Lv2  8 MB  4/8  2.50 GHz  45W  22 nm $294
E3-1220Lv2  3 MB  2/4  2.30 GHz  17W  22 nm $189

The last two members of the lineup, the E3-1265L v2 and E3-1220L v2, are aimed at micro-servers. They have thermal envelopes of just 45W and 17W, respectively. Intel says the 17W model is meant for “low end dedicated hosting and basic content delivery,” among other applications.

Comments closed
    • Bensam123
    • 8 years ago

    And you can get a 8/16 core BD based Opteron for a third the price and not nearly a third of the performance of the Intel based equivalent.

      • chuckula
      • 8 years ago

      Oh really now.. considering the best desktop Bulldozers are worse than the 2500K in most benchmarks and almost never beat the 2600 even in multithreaded benchmarks… please show me the ~$100 8-core Bulldozer that is so great.

        • Bensam123
        • 8 years ago

        8 cores, 16 logical…

    • ermo
    • 8 years ago

    Does anyone know if ASUS’s P8B WS BIOS/UEFI supports the permanent turbo mode of its desktop brethren, you know where the CPU runs all its cores at its max turbo boost frequency permanently when asked to?

    A Xeon E3-1245v2 or E3-1275v2 and 4×4 GB DDR3-1600 ECC RAM would be neat for a workstation/casual gaming box which could be repurposed to an undervolted always-on Linux home server box with good VM capabilities a couple of years down the line…

    • Anonymous Coward
    • 8 years ago

    Looks like 22nm E3-1220LV2 is just about identical to the old 32nm E3-1220L. They added 100mhz base and turbo, and went from 20W to 17W. I’m not sure that that is an impressive upgrade.

    I have considered getting one of those for a passive project, obviously with an external graphics card, since they are GPU-less.

      • UberGerbil
      • 8 years ago

      20w to 17w is 15%. Adding performance while dropping that much power draw borders on what I’d call impressive. It’s not the kind of thing that makes headlines, but when you’re talking potentially thousands of units in a datacenter the savings could be significant.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 8 years ago

        Eh, 15% is not impressing me. This is the low voltage, low power stuff I thought 22nm was supposed to be awesome at.

          • smilingcrow
          • 8 years ago

          22nm as you say is supposed to excel at low voltage but that might mean for low voltage low performance parts intended for phones and tablets and not for laptops/desktops and even the low voltage versions for those platforms.
          But is this even a low voltage CPU? Just because it has a low TDP doesn’t make it a low voltage part.

    • bcronce
    • 8 years ago

    E3-1225v2 4/4 3.20 GHz $209

    PFSense firewall!

    E3-1230v2 4/8 3.30 GHz $215

    FreeBSD Fileshare+CS+TF2+Minecraft!

    I like these prices.

      • Deanjo
      • 8 years ago

      [quote<]E3-1225v2 4/4 3.20 GHz $209 PFSense firewall![/quote<] Can you say "massive overkill"?

      • Jason181
      • 8 years ago

      I noticed that too; who would buy a 1225 when a 1230 is only $6 more and gets you hyperthreading and an extra 100 Mhz at 8 watts less?

        • gplnpsb
        • 8 years ago

        For integrated graphics. The integrated gpu is active in Xeon E3 chips with model numbers ending in 12×5. It is permanently disabled in those models ending in 12×0.

          • Jason181
          • 8 years ago

          Oh, thanks!

    • glynor
    • 8 years ago

    I smell new Mac Pros finally.

      • blastdoor
      • 8 years ago

      Indeed… I will have to think long and hard about upgrading to a system with 16/32 cores. That would more than double the performance of my 2009 Nehalem 8/16 Mac Pro. My current system is definitely very fast, but I would certainly notice if it were 2xVeryFast.

        • RhysAndrews
        • 8 years ago

        Meh, for the past 6 months all I’ve heard is that they’re planning to get rid of Mac Pro’s entirely. Yep, Mac Mini’s can TOTALLY manage an entire company..

          • glynor
          • 8 years ago

          “All you’ve heard” from people talking out of their nether regions.

          • blastdoor
          • 8 years ago

          that is one rumor, but it’s not the only one out there.

          My guess/hope is that they will not get rid of the Mac Pro “entirely”. I think the most likely scenario is that they’ll keep it pretty much the same as its been but with updated CPU, GPU, and thunderbolt ports. The next most likely scenario is a dramatic re-imagining of what a Pro desktop Mac should be (but it would still involve Xeons and ECC RAM).

      • Deanjo
      • 8 years ago

      Complete with Nvidia graphics I imagine.

    • Chrispy_
    • 8 years ago

    Intel’s server lineup confuses the hell out of me.

    I basically have to look up the exact model on that huge wikipedia specs list to work out what I need to know to understand what it really is: [list<][*<]Dual, Quad, or Hex? [/*<][*<]Hyperthreading (y/n?) [/*<][*<]TDP [/*<][*<]Clockspeed [/*<][*<]Nahalem, Sandy, or Ivy architecture?[/*<][/list<] If their naming system actually reflects that, they're doing it in the most confusing way possible....

      • grantmeaname
      • 8 years ago

      First digit is socket count, middle digits are a relative indicator of performance, as in graphics cards, and the last digit used to indicate TDP relative to performance but now is apparently meaningless.

      • smilingcrow
      • 8 years ago

      Anyone that has the job of choosing the specs for workstations and servers will surely at least have the ability to decode a few lists on the web? Otherwise they are in the wrong job surely.

        • odizzido
        • 8 years ago

        true, but that doesn’t mean intel should make things difficult.

          • smilingcrow
          • 8 years ago

          Difficult is a relative term and I can’t see how this can be classified as anything but a very minor inconvenience at most and that’s pushing it.

          I think they need to focus on making the branding for consumer products clear as that is where you have to sell to the uninformed which means branding is king.
          Business purchasers can look after themselves.

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