Gigabyte’s X11 notebook weighs less than a kilogram

As promised last week, Gigabyte has taken the wraps of what it claims is the world’s lightest notebook. Say hello to the X11, which tips the scales at a measly 2.1 lbs—less than a kilogram. Much of the weight loss likely comes from the carbon fiber chassis, which employs a wedge-shaped design that’s 3- to 16.5-mm thick. The X11 is the only “full carbon fiber notebook on earth,” according to Gigabyte, although the company concedes that the chassis does feature a few aluminum pieces, such as the hinge holding the display.

Carbon fiber has a great strength-to-weight ratio, and the resulting weave gives the X11 unique aesthetic flair. A clear lacquer coating preserves the weave for one version of the system, while a black variant offers a more subdued look. Both finishes appear to be polished by hand to ensure the “perfect chassis shape.”

Unfortunately, the X11’s screen falls a little short of perfection. The 11.6″ panel containes 1366×768 pixels, which is reasonable for the size but hardly impressive. There’s no mention of the display technology, so it’s probably a TN panel.

Under the hood, the X11 features Intel’s Ivy Bridge CPUs, though no model numbers are provided in the official press release. We do know the system comes with 4GB of RAM, a 128GB SSD, USB 2.0 and 3.0 ports, Gigabit Ethernet, and both Bluetooth 4.0 and 802.11n wireless connectivity. It also has a relatively small 35Wh battery, which surely saves some weight. Expect this puppy to arrive in July, with prices ranging from $999-1299.

Gigabyte has added a couple of other notebooks to its stable alongside the X11. The U2442 and U2440 are somewhat less exciting, with 14″ chassis and no carbon fiber goodness. However, they feature discrete graphics chips and hybrid storage configurations to complement their Ivy Bridge CPUs.

The U2442’s 14″ panel has a 1600×900 display resolution, which is a nice touch. Users will have their choice of GeForce GT 640M or 650M graphics chips. They’ll also be able to pair the system’s 128GB mSATA SSD with secondary mechanical storage. The U2442’s chassis is still relatively thin, measuring 21 mm at its thickest point, and it’s relatively light at 3.5-3.7 lbs. The keyboard has a backlight that adjusts its brightness based on the ambient light conditions, too.

If you need an optical drive, the U2440 serves one up in a slightly thicker (21.5 mm) and heavier (4.2 lbs) enclosure. This lower-end config has a GeForce GT 630M GPU and a terabyte of mechanical storage. Users do have the option of adding a 32GB mSATA SSD, though. Unfortunately, there’s no way to upgrade the screen from its 1366×768 resolution. The U2440 is set to cost just $699 when it becomes available at the end of June. The U2442 will come out a little earlier and be priced from $999-1299.

Comments closed
    • kfleszar
    • 7 years ago

    I am so disappointed when I see a 16×9 TN screen with 1366×768 resolution in an ultrabook. All three 16×9, TN, and 768 vertical resolution are so bad for any type of work.

    Someone once told me that one should insist on good quality bed and shoes, because one spends their life between them. Well, I spend a considerable part of my life looking at monitors.

    I’ve been looking for an ultrabook for some time and I am seriously considering buying a MacBook Pro and installing Windows.

      • cygnus1
      • 7 years ago

      except the U2442 has a 1600×900 (not 1366×768) matte screen. which is a really nice sweet spot if you ask me

    • Arclight
    • 7 years ago

    So it’s a tablet with keyboard in a laptop form factor. Marketing say “Tablet? Balls! Let’s advertise it as a sub 1 kg latop.”

    • fredsnotdead
    • 7 years ago

    Will this or any of the notebooks mentioned in the comments come with Windows 7? I don’t think I’m going to like Windows-for-tablets (sorry, “Windows 8”) on a real computer.

      • UberGerbil
      • 7 years ago

      If they come out in the next few months, as most seem poised to do, there won’t be a release version of Windows 8 for them to ship with yet.

    • cygnus1
    • 7 years ago

    if the U2442 has decent battery life, I can just about guarantee it’ll be my next laptop. the specs and size of that are pretty much everything i’ve wanted in a laptop the last couple years

    edit: googled it and it even looks good too.

    edit 2: i want it now – [url<]http://www.engadget.com/2012/03/06/gigabyte-u2442-ultrabook-hands-on/[/url<]

      • UberGerbil
      • 7 years ago

      In the hands-on video it actually looks like a matte screen (at least, no serious glare in what is a pretty harsh “test” environment) so kudos for that. Can’t really conclude anything without actually trying it myself, but it looks like Gigabyte managed to avoid at least some of the common mistakes.

      (Sorry to see VGA rather than DVI-I, even if the latter does require a dongle / non-standard cable for VGA projectors)

        • cygnus1
        • 7 years ago

        you can convert the hdmi port to dvi pretty easily, but i think it would be dvi-d. that and vga covers the majority of use cases i think

          • UberGerbil
          • 7 years ago

          It covers the use cases, I’m just complaining about seeing the actual VGA socket. You still need analog, unfortunately, because of the legacy of projectors and whatnot, but DVI-d gives you more options in the same space. It’s a minor nit.

        • cygnus1
        • 7 years ago

        i also want to say, i agree. the screen does look matte.

        i’m honestly not sure where i’d end buying this from. i looked on newegg and i didn’t see any gigabyte laptops at all.

        also, between the look of the track pad, the thunderbolt, and aluminum lid this thing looks a lot like a mac book pro. which isn’t a bad thing. i’ve said for a while if someone can build something like a mac book pro, but that just has a pc keyboard layout, i’m sold.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 7 years ago

    Assuming the keyboard and touchpad are solid I really like the design of the x11. That being said I’d throw a pound on that laptop in exchange for a bigger battery and discrete GPU.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 7 years ago

    I can carry a 3 pound laptop in one hand, with ease. I think this has reached a point where we’re getting nothing in return for the alleged trade off. This isn’t more portable than many other 12″ laptops.

    Speaking of which, Engadget has a review of the Thinkpad X230 up. [b<]This[/b<] is what manufacturers should be doing to improve ultraportables. [url<]http://www.engadget.com/2012/05/31/lenovo-thinkpad-x230-review/[/url<] Summary: It's thinner and weighs less than the X220, now just 3 pounds even, and it's IPS standard, with a 1600x900 option. For people worried about the keyboard, they say it doesn't flex. And still with a full voltage CPU, unlike the X1, which seems to be dropping it. The only bummer is that the battery doesn't last longer, but there's little reason to expect a big gain there, anyways.

      • BiffStroganoffsky
      • 7 years ago

      The farbon is great for folks like Geoff to coordinate with their bikes. If you thought texting while driving on the roadways is bad, wait ’til you have cyclists tweeting on their bikes on trails and sidewalks!

        • indeego
        • 7 years ago

        This is already occurring with regularity. You don’t even need to use your hands for doing this using smartphones.

      • kamikaziechameleon
      • 7 years ago

      The aesthetics of the thinkpad are not there for me. I get its for function. I can’t argue with that but its just a poor looking comp to me.

        • UberGerbil
        • 7 years ago

        Which is why they do their Edge series. But these functional points are really independent of aesthetics; for some reason Lenovo gets them right and few of the other manufacturers do.

      • UberGerbil
      • 7 years ago

      Not to mention the craze for shaving thickness has reached the point where keyboard action is compromised (though in many cases they’d be using a crappy keyboard regardless). And OMGlossy hasn’t gone away either. Why Lenovo understands all these factors and seemingly none of the other makers do is an enduring mystery, unless there are still people there dating back to the original IBM Thinkpad days. Then again, when you consider what comes out of the likes of Gigabyte in terms of utility software UIs and UEFI design, I guess we should be thankful it’s not worse.

      • dpaus
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]with a 1600x900 option[/quote<] Where did you see that?

        • UberGerbil
        • 7 years ago

        See the Engadget hands-on link Cygnus1 posted

          • dpaus
          • 7 years ago

          Cygnus1’s link is for the Gigabyte U2442, and OAS says the 1600×900 option is for the Lenovo X230.

            • UberGerbil
            • 7 years ago

            Sorry, misunderstood your question.

        • OneArmedScissor
        • 7 years ago

        Sorry. That was the word as of just a few days ago. Now, nobody is really sure, and reviews stopped mentioning it.

          • dpaus
          • 7 years ago

          Ah, the classic “I did not say this, because I was never here” gambit.

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