AMD adds a handful of faster Opterons

The Opteron processor family has just gotten a little bigger: AMD has added five new models, all of which offer slightly higher clock speeds and higher performance than the previous flagships in the same series—and without stepping into larger power envelopes. AMD introduced the new CPUs earlier this morning, and here they are:

Model Cores Clock speed Peak Turbo speed L3 cache TDP Price
6284 SE 16 2.7GHz 3.4GHz 16MB 140W $1,265
6278 16 2.4GHz 3.3GHz 16MB 115W $989
4276 HE 8 2.6GHz 3.6GHz 8MB 65W $455
4240 6 3.4GHz 3.8GHz 8MB 95W $316
4230 6 2.9GHz 3.7GHz 8MB 65W $377

(I’m not sure what to call the last one in the list. AMD’s announcement calls it the Opteron 4230, but the company’s Processor Model Numbers page dubs it the Opteron 4230 HE. The HE suffix makes sense considering the power envelope, I suppose, so it’s probably correct.)

These new models all have base and peak Turbo speeds exactly 100MHz higher than previous top-of-the-line offerings. For instance, the new Opteron 6284 SE slots in above the old Opteron 6282 SE, which runs at 2.6GHz with a 3.3GHz top Turbo speed and a 140W TDP. The faster chips are more expensive, of course. For example, the 6284 SE costs $1,265, compared to $1,019 for the 6282 SE.

AMD says these quicker Opterons are going to show up in 11 new servers from its partners, and two of those machines will be HP systems based on the PC maker’s ProLiant Gen8 platform. They’ll include the ProLiant Gen8 DL385p, a "performance-based rack server," and the ProLiant Gen8 BL465c, a blade server that can enable a core density of 2,000 cores per rack. Both of those HP servers are tuned for virtualization, database, and HPC workloads, AMD says.

Comments closed
    • brute
    • 7 years ago

    1300 bucks for some melted sand with a nickel coated copper hat and some etched circuits?

    no thanks. i think ill buy beer and make sand with the bottles. at least this way i can be at da beach

      • forumics
      • 7 years ago

      well you can’t play crisis with sand, beer or bottles

      • rrr
      • 7 years ago

      You’re absolutely right! I fall to my knees and worship you for your infinite wisdom.

    • phileasfogg
    • 7 years ago

    AMD’s server roadmap slide (shown at the Financial Analyst Day in Feb 2012) says they will stick with the 32nm process node for server CPUs in ’12 and ’13. This is somewhat disappointing, I’m sure, considering that there will be significant power and performance gains in the next process node coming out of GF in ’13. What must also be disappointing to Opteron customers is the (apparent) lack of PCIe Gen3 support on Opteron socket G34 and socket C32 – although AMD may yet surprise us and offer Gen3 support earlier than most expect. The roadmap slide for ‘Abu Dhabi’ and ‘Seoul’ CPUs makes no mention of PCIe Gen3 however.

      • JMccovery
      • 7 years ago

      I think the transition to Server/Desktop CPUs with integrated PCI-E may happen when Steamroller based dies launch.

      I was waiting with bated breath for C2012 (Triple-channel DDR3-1866+ with 16/24 integrated PCI-E lanes), and G2012 (Quad-channel DDR3-1866+ with 32-48 PCI-E lanes).

    • Silus
    • 7 years ago

    Typo in the first sentence. It’s “bigger” and not “biger”

    • jdaven
    • 7 years ago

    Before anyone goes crazy about that 140W TDP, you should read this story first:

    [url<]http://vr-zone.com/articles/high-end-ivy-bridge-and-haswell-intel-to-trade-tdp-for-performance/16047.html[/url<] The article speculates that Haswell Xeons could have TDPs up to 180W. Of course these chips will probably be incredibly powerful from a performance perspective but the absolute TDP might go up.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 7 years ago

      It will probably also go down. They’ll sell whatever people ask for, and today, that’s all sorts of things. With configurable TDPs and prices determined by number of cores, you may as well start at the top. A lower clocked chip isn’t going to save you anything.

      • chuckula
      • 7 years ago

      I’m not surprised that a 16 core Haswell will weigh in at 180 watts considering that Intel is tweaking those chips to be more competitive with GPUs… which usually *start* at TDPs of about 225 watts and go up from there. Intel is positioning Haswell-EP for the high-end server market, where chips like the Power 7 already have TDP numbers of around 180 watts, and Haswell-EP + Knights Corner for the HPC crowd to compete with GPUs.

      OneArmed is also right: Just because some models will have 180 watt TDPs does not mean they all will. Additionally, these chips will likely also have very low idle power so you’ll only get up to higher wattages under the heaviest of workloads.

      • flip-mode
      • 7 years ago

      Why the downvotes?

        • gmskking
        • 7 years ago

        I would have to guess that douche baggery is involved.

      • bcronce
      • 7 years ago

      Very informative,. +1

      One thing to mention is that Intel lists TDP as “peak” and AMD lists TDP as “average”.

      Example, my brother OC’d his i7-920(2.66ghz) to 3.8ghz and bumped it +0.1v. Even with all of that, it didn’t break 90watts during a Prime95 burn-in. The stock TDP was 130 watts. Intel loves a lot of headroom.

      AMD has been shown to reach its stated TDP quite easily.

      The past can’t predict the future, but it can give you a good estimate.

    • Shouefref
    • 7 years ago

    So, this is the new line-up for serves.
    And some days ago we got the new line-up for mobile things.
    Than what’s in store for desktops?

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 7 years ago

      [url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amd_trinity#.22Trinity.22.2C_.22Weatherford.22_and_.22Richland.22_.28all_32.C2.A0nm.29[/url<]

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        I believe he is referring more to Volan and Vishera then to APU’s.

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 7 years ago

          But that is what’s in store. The successor to Bulldozer is a ways off.

            • FuturePastNow
            • 7 years ago

            [url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMD_Vishera#2nd_Generation[/url<] [quote<]The 2nd generation FX-series is scheduled to be released in Q3 2012 (July to Sept) with the FX-8350, FX-8320, FX-6300, and FX-4320 models.[/quote<] That's the same timeframe as desktop Trinity.

            • OneArmedScissor
            • 7 years ago

            The only thing that’s ever the same about timeframes given by AMD is that they’re always wrong. :p

            You still can’t even buy Trinity laptops, nor is anyone really showing them off. Bulldozer didn’t really reach availability until the end of last year. Whether they want to move a bit faster or not, I suspect it will still take them a year from then.

            After all, look at the subject of the article we’re discussing this in.

            • FuturePastNow
            • 7 years ago

            Well, it [i<]is[/i<] a three-month window. Hopefully, we'll all get to read a Vishera review before the end of this year.

          • Shouefref
          • 7 years ago

          No, he’s right, I’m more thinking about something like Virgo.

          Fact is that I noticed that here is a gap between het Hz’s of Trinity and of the new Opterons, and as Trinity is for mobiles (and therefore low Hz’s) and Opteron is for servers (and really quick), I suppose there should be something in between.

      • JMccovery
      • 7 years ago

      Actually, this is more of an update to the current Opteron lineup, the Abu Dhabi, Seould and Delhi Opterons (3300, 4300 and 6300) are slated to launch sometime in Q3, either before or after Vishera

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