Lucid Dynamix increases gaming fluidity on notebook IGPs

Computex — Lucid has done all kinds of interesting things in systems with multiple graphics processors. Now, it’s targeting notebooks equipped only with Intel integrated graphics. The company’s new XLR8 Dynamix software is designed to allow slower GPUs to deliver playable frame rates by, ahem, dynamically lowering the texture detail of background objects. We saw Dynamix demoed at Computex, and it appears to have some promise.

Dynamix was showcased on two systems: a Sandy Bridge notebook with Diablo 3 and an Ivy Bridge system with Battlefield 3. Diablo 3 ran at 18-20 FPS with Dynamix disabled and around 35 FPS with Lucid’s new mojo turned on. The improvement wasn’t as dramatic in Battlefield 3, which jumped from 15-19 FPS to 21-24 FPS in the short snippet of gameplay we were shown. Background textures looked a little fuzzier in both games, but the improvements in fluidity were more apparent than the degradations in image quality. Unfortunately, we had to run to another meeting and couldn’t spend more time with the systems.

According to Lucid CEO Moshe Steiner, Dynamix was inspired by an Intel whitepaper on texture scaling. Dynamic texture scaling is hard to do, Steiner admitted, but he said the company’s experience working with rendering objects helped it to develop algorithms that identify background textures that are good candidates for scaling. Those algorithms are still being tuned, and users may be given control over how aggressive they are. We’ll know more later this year; Lucid is planning to release Dynamix in the fourth quarter.

Comments closed
    • Myrmecophagavir
    • 7 years ago

    I don’t understand what this actually does. Texture detail should automatically be lowered on distant objects anyway through mipmapping. Does it just bias the mip level selection lower?

      • Myrmecophagavir
      • 7 years ago

      Plus, if Diablo 3 goes from 20 FPS to 35 just by fiddling about with texture detail, that really should go into the game’s options.

    • yogibbear
    • 7 years ago

    I thought their tech would involve taking pills to enjoy your gaming experience more…

    • jamsbong
    • 7 years ago

    Is Lucid’s concept a dynamic visual quality manager? Like the game RAGE but on the driver layer interface? I know RAGE is too rigid demanding 60fps all the time. I guess this manager software makes allows a wider range of fps?

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 7 years ago

    Could this mean we may be able to rely on someone other than Intel for driver support?

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      Nope, it means you will have to rely on intel AND Lucid. It’s the same issue with all of lucid’s products.

    • Deanjo
    • 7 years ago

    XLR8…….. Don’t think PNY is going to be crazy about Lucid’s choice of name.

    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    Good games normally use texture scaling like this… I could see this tech not always playing well with other dynamic texture algorithms already in place. Then again there are a lot of games that don’t do it well or at all.

    Interesting…

    • pikaporeon
    • 7 years ago

    No Red Baron references?

      • Yeats
      • 7 years ago

      Stellar 7 rocked on my Amiga 500.

    • slaimus
    • 7 years ago

    So they implemented the equivalent of Catalyst AI on Intel graphics. I hope there is no quake/quack part two.

    [url<]https://techreport.com/articles.x/3089/1[/url<]

    • Dposcorp
    • 7 years ago

    I like this a lot. Tune the algorithm, give me a slider(s) to control over how aggressive it is, and the ability to disable it and that would be great. This is the kind of thing that wont work for everyone or every game, but when it does work, it will be a big deal and a nice boost. Otherwise, you can turn it off.

    For those times when it makes a unplayable game playable, the user is a big winner.

    • Hattig
    • 7 years ago

    I can see this actually being useful on Trinity, to eke out that extra 20% or so. But it does seem like something that should be in the graphics drivers as an option rather than in a third party tool.

    • thesmileman
    • 7 years ago

    I used this when they had a beta version for skyrim, disabling my graphics card used my intel integrated graphics. It certainly increased performance but I would hardly call it enjoyable as the framerate was still low even with everything at minimums. It didn’t seem to cause a big hit to the quality though. I am sure if they keep tweaking it then will eventually make it decent..

    • cegras
    • 7 years ago

    Didn’t TR express discontent with the texture filtering on intel’s solutions? The IGPs produced playable frame rates but the image quality was pretty bad. Perhaps they’re using the size / ppi of the notebook screen, with respect to viewing distance, to determine if a texture that’s 20 x 20 pixels will not benefit from increased texture quality?

      • Bensam123
      • 7 years ago

      Not sure why you were rated down, but yes. AMD and Nvidia both have texture sliders in their graphics control panels as well.

        • cegras
        • 7 years ago

        No idea, I’ve given up on trying to explain why people just rate down instead of discussing.

          • l33t-g4m3r
          • 7 years ago

          It’s an easy troll feature, and completely irrelevant to a discussion, that’s why. Some people may even use multiple accounts.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 7 years ago

      I doubt it’s doing anything that smart. Probably just lowering texture quality based on how long it takes to render frames.

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