Apple patent covers wedge-shaped laptops

PC makers have been shamelessly ripping off Apple for years, and ultrabooks are the latest and starkest example. Could Apple throw its weight around and force ultrabook makers to make machines less reminiscent of the MacBook Air? Maybe so, if the Mac maker’s latest patent is any indication.

The Verge spotted the patent and offers some interesting analysis. It says the dashed lines in the patent’s technical drawings are meant to be ignored, but the solid lines are not—and those outline the MacBook Air’s contoured wedge shape, which is thick at the back and slim at the front. See below:

According to The Verge, the patent "is clearly intended to broadly cover the distinctive wedge or teardrop profile of the notebook." Considering how litigious Apple has been against competitors like Samsung in the smartphone and tablet markets, that might not bode well for ultrabook manufacturers. Then again, The Verge points out that Apple’s competitors "can still rely on meaningful tweaks to the angles, shapes and proportions of their notebook designs to avoid the patent."

I suppose it’s too early to tell, but perhaps at the very least, the patent will encourage PC vendors to adopt more original designs. That might not be so bad. Not every ultrabook needs to be a MacBook lookalike.

Comments closed
    • cphite
    • 7 years ago

    Basically, Apple is trying to stop competitors from deliberately making laptops that look like Apple laptops. It’s extremely unlikely that they’d ever go after someone for making a laptop that is generically “wedge” shaped; or even if they did, that any court would take it seriously.

    They’re basically trying to prevent deliberate knock-offs of their products.

    • deb0
    • 7 years ago

    A patent on the shape of a computer. Seriously!?! It’s obvious that Apple is doing whatever it can to stifle, if not all but eliminate competition. Ridiculous.

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 7 years ago

    Uh oh, watch out ASUS! [url=http://racunalo.com/images/stories/2010a-racunala/asus-g75vw-01.jpg<]G75VW![/url<]

    • spigzone
    • 7 years ago

    Poetic justice would be if whoever actually had the earliest prior art (Sony Vaio 505?) sued to invalidate Apple’s patent, then applied for and got approved their patent for the wedge design and then successfully sued apple to stop using that design.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 7 years ago

    And people this is why I think patent law is broken.

    • mikehodges2
    • 7 years ago

    That just looks like they’re patenting the MBA shape (which may or may not become the macbook pro shape too), not a sweeping “ANYTHING THAT IS A LAPTOP” patent.

    Perhaps change the flame bait article title?

    • entropy13
    • 7 years ago

    A lot of worthless comments from the unenlightened masses, it seems.

      • entropy13
      • 7 years ago

      Thumb me down, if you must, but the Holy Apple will be forever unbowed!

        • superjawes
        • 7 years ago

        Do you ever get tired of trolling?

          • entropy13
          • 7 years ago

          This is not trolling, I am the messenger of the core beliefs and wishes of the Enlightened Ones.

            • superjawes
            • 7 years ago

            So you should be posting in the R & P forum?

            • moresmarterthanspock
            • 7 years ago

            I’m going to patent triangles and right angles, and the letter G, as well as the letter and roman numeral M.

    • shank15217
    • 7 years ago

    Intel’s own ultrabook reference design is similar to this, I dare Apple to try to collect on Intel. If Intel had to choose between Apple and HP/Dell/Samsung/Toshiba/Asus/Acer/Gateway etc etc humm I wonder what they would do.

      • albundy
      • 7 years ago

      i really hope they do. i would laugh so hard when intel refuses to supply them with any of their chips. good luck with TB in that case! lol

    • Hattig
    • 7 years ago

    Design Patents. Patenting the imaginable. Bunch of crap that stifles competition.

    • Sam125
    • 7 years ago

    You have to admit, a lot of notebook vendors do shamelessly copy Apple’s design cues. It’s kind of sad that the other vendors don’t have the margins, or apparently the profits to hire legitimate industrial designers.

      • Silus
      • 7 years ago

      You mean like Apple copied the ultrabook design from Sony ? And is now trying to patent that design as their own ? How ridiculous can you get for copying other people’s work, then trying to patent it as their own, so that they can sue everyone else ?

      If other companies copy any of Apple designs, at least they don’t try to patent it as their own, like Apple does. But as any troll, it should be ignored or beaten like the troll it is, but the US authorities for competition must be getting some awesome bribes from Apple, to allow this anti-competitive behavior since ever, from the fruitish company.

    • yogibbear
    • 7 years ago

    I just patented a 90 degree brick wall. You’re all f***ing broke! AHAHAHahahaHAAHah

      • Arclight
      • 7 years ago

      Holy sh*t! That’s so evil. Now you can hold the world ransom

    • Silus
    • 7 years ago

    The US Patent Office is a good example of extreme dumbness, since they’re basically like monkeys with stamps that allow anything to be a patent. From black rectangles with buttons, to the teardrop profile of an ultrabook. Oddly (or not) these are all from Apple…

    Oh and if others copy Apple, Apple does the same now and in the past, with even the douche Steve Jobs admitting they do on public record. But the problem isn’t Apple itself. It’s their dumb legion of fans that support this sort of behavior. The “When you violate our patents, it’s wrong and we sue! But when we violate your patents, it’s ok, otherwise the system needs fixing”.
    Apple doesn’t quite fit the patent troll definition, because at least they do have products, but it’s almost there…

      • shank15217
      • 7 years ago

      Oh so the us patent office is suppose to have on staff a group of astronomers to zoologist so they can break down every single patent request that comes through their office? Don’t call them dumb, I would like to see you do their jobs and btw Apple has every right to patent whatever they feel like, no one stopped sony from doing so years before. Patents can and have been revoked when proof of past work was presented. You can write with a pen or you can stab someone with it but stabbing someone was never the intent of the inventor right?

        • rrr
        • 7 years ago

        OK, next up Apple patents breathing and charges every person in the planet for royalties.

          • stdRaichu
          • 7 years ago

          Nah, that would never fly in court and would eventually be thrown out.

          However, I’d be worried about the temporary breathing ban whilst the matter is settled.

      • Austin
      • 7 years ago

      🙁 Yup those guys are dumb and patent too much. The shape isn’t that distinct from what’s already out there IMHO. Another good example was the US being the only place to grant Epson a patent so their printers were the only ones permitted to print directly to discs. Other printers which were made with this ability (for the rest of the world) had to have the functionality intentionally disabled for the US. All AFAIK/IIRC.

    • FubbHead
    • 7 years ago

    I can’t help thinking this is the “natural” shape of any thin laptop. It has been trimmed in the only places it can be, so basically it’s the only shape it can have.

    • Arclight
    • 7 years ago

    This is patent trolling. It’s like car manufacturers patented 4 wheels on a chassis……

    • Jigar
    • 7 years ago

    On dailytech – [Update: Apple’s patent appears invalid due to prior art — Sony Corp. (TYO:6758) released a teardrop laptop in 2004, the Sony VAIO X505.]

    I really feel that dude needs to be fired…

      • nico1982
      • 7 years ago

      Patent office employer aside, I’m always surprised by the amount of ‘IT journalist’ that ignore the existence of the venerable X505. It was an incredible piece of tech and design, one of the best invention of the old, good Sony.

      I mean [url<]http://blog.51.ca/u-110878/files/2008/07/pcg-x505-1.jpg[/url<]

    • Jigar
    • 7 years ago

    The person who approved this patent should be fired on the spot.

      • Arclight
      • 7 years ago

      I propose we execute the motherf**ker. Let’s get our pitchforks and gather in front of his house. Next one in line will be the ones that filled for this patent.

    • Derfer
    • 7 years ago

    My guess is they have at least some self-awareness of the ridiculousness of their patents. If they challenge it’s probable the patent will be invalidated and they’ll be stuck with lawyer fees and no profit.

    On the other hand the lawyers usually steer the ship which tends to remove the common sense element.

    • cheapFreeAgent
    • 7 years ago

    This will be followed by a keyboard maker patents their wedge-shape keyboards..
    then by a shoe company of it’s wedge-shape shoes..

    just like Chrispy_’s comment.

    • WillBach
    • 7 years ago

    The design patent looks like it’s more about the curve of the lid than the wedge shape. The patent cites the Sony Viao X505 as an “other publication” so I looked it up, it has a similar wedge shape, particularly in the bottom half. After I saw that, it was clear on second reading that design patent diagrams seemed focused on the curved, “super compressed dome” aspect of the lid, and the gradually sloping nature of the bottom. Those are more novel (and can be applied less broadly if patented) than a regular geometric wedge, and they’re also part of why the MacBook Air is so comfortable to hold in the hand.

    IANAL

      • jpostel
      • 7 years ago

      Finally! Someone that seems to have read the article. Design patents are pretty standard fare. They exist as a legal defense against KIRFing.

      That said, Apple has gone overboard in a lot of it’s design patent litigation in the smartphone space, and I think they would lose if they tried the same thing in the laptop space. There are just far too many existing designs. For them to really win, it would have to be a near copy.

        • cynan
        • 7 years ago

        While I agree that it is generally laudable to be well informed before responding to what might be construed as sensational journalism (not directed at TR), the fact remains that trying to patent the shape of a laptop – especially one so close to dozens of past designs – is at least a little ridiculous.

        Furthermore, I am at a loss to see how such a patent helps Apple. Don’t they know that imitation is the best form of flattery? If anything, imitations of Apple products will surely only further cement the widely-held perception that Apple’s products are most desirable, and if anything, promote even more future sales for Apple.

          • jpostel
          • 7 years ago

          Your points are good, and I get the ridiculousness, but I will make two counter-points:

          1. If I make Porsches and every other car maker starts to make their cars look like mine, but not quite, what brand differentiation do I now have? If everything looks like a Porsche, then why buy a real Porsche? For reference, search “Porsche design patents”, and you will find that Porsche has patented all manner of exterior stuff like fender designs, as well as the real technical stuff like gearboxes. The insides of Apple laptops are pretty much the same as every other laptop out there, so (from my perspective) people are either buying them for MacOS, the “Apple design”, or both.

          2. Although this is a patent, what Apple really fears is becoming generic. It pretty much sums up their goals from a branding perspective. A [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generic_trademark<]good synopsis[/url<] of the history on Wikipedia. They fear "smartphone" being replaced by "iphone", and "tablet" by "ipad". Lest we forget, aspirin, escalator, and zipper were all trademarks at one time, but were victims of their own ubiquity.

            • cynan
            • 7 years ago

            To answer:

            1) History has shown me that automobile design has been significantly more varied than the generic clam-shell format adopted by all laptops. The thing is, all laptops are going to look more or less the same, due to functional imperative. Trying to sub-deviate further just seems kind of petty and insecure.. Secondly, while the insides of comparative laptops may be similar, the structural quality of Macbooks are known to be of superior quality to your average PC (and you pay for it).

            2) WTF? How does unanimous recognition make them victims?

            • The Wanderer
            • 7 years ago

            In that they [i<]aren't[/i<] universally recognized - not as brand names; even I couldn't have told you about "Escalator", even though I knew that the other two had originally been specific rather than general terms. Having the name of your product be universally recognized is a very strong good thing, from a marketing and PR perspective - but having that name not be recognized as having to do with [i<]your[/i<] product, as opposed to just "any product of this type", is an even stronger bad thing. Xerox came fairly close to having the same problem at one point, I think... if nothing else, I certainly recall knowing what a "xerox" was before I knew that it was a brand name, and I remember a Canon radio ad for their copiers which pointed out that "it's illegal to call a copy a Xerox".

            • cynan
            • 7 years ago

            This, to me, is an unfathomable proposition. While I can see such dangers being real for companies such as Kleenex or Kraft (Mac ‘n Cheese), the idea that people people will begin to forget associating solid silver minimalistic laptops with Apple in the foreseeable future is a hard pill to swallow. After all, this is precisely at least half the reason why other PC makers are clamoring to replicate in the first place: For the very fact that Apple does have this ubiquitous brand recognition – they want a piece.

            To posit that Apple is preparing for a future where structurally solid aluminum-billet, high screen quality laptops comprise the generic default is hard to believe. But it would sure be great for people in the market for a laptop during such a future era so enlightened in the ways of mobile computing.

            What it does at the present is cement in consumer’s minds how desirable the Macbook design is. Hence it boost the desirability of Macs. Settling for the mostly half-hearted attempts at replication of this design when investing in a computer is surely settling for an inferior product – something that obviously doesn’t site well with many consumers. For unlike Kleenex, any ‘ol substitute won’t be just as good. Most consumers form irrational sentimental attachments to big ticket items such as mobile PCs and often they are an extension of their social status. Honestly, I don’t think Apple has anything to worry about here. At least not for a long while.

          • WillBach
          • 7 years ago

          If it were a general patent on all wedge shapes in laptops, it would be ridiculous; you’re right. If Apple tries to use it that way they would deserve to have their ass laughed out of court. But if it’s a design patent (which is more off a trademark) on an exact shape of a lid, it’s less ridiculous, especially when they hang the lantern of “Vaio laptops have looked sort of like this before” on it.

          On one hand, I want a Zenbook to feel as good in my hand as a MBA does. On the other, I can see that a lot of effort went into making the lid just so. I’ll take another look at my friend’s Zenbook, but I don’t think it would infringe on this patent because of the flatish shape of the lid.

    • anotherengineer
    • 7 years ago

    I wonder if they will patent these wedges also?

    [url<]http://www.stories.the-ridges.net/images/wedge2.jpg[/url<] [url<]http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_cmV7mAxwOj8/R3C2YjdnY0I/AAAAAAAAAU8/d9f1vr9wEhQ/s400/finalfantasy3-wedge.jpg[/url<]

    • demani
    • 7 years ago

    Just to get the prior art thing out: could someone show an example of prior art with that tear drop shape?

    Honest question-there’s a lot of talk, but so far nobody has given an example from before the MBA shipped.

    Just trying to find some truth on that issue.

      • lilbuddhaman
      • 7 years ago

      How about an ACTUAL Clamshell? or an ACTUAL tear drop?

      HOLY **** THESE AREN’T PATENTABLE IDEAS. THESE ARE BASIC ORGANIC SHAPES.

      • bender
      • 7 years ago

      Yes:

      Sony VAIO X505
      Dell XPS M1530

    • Washer
    • 7 years ago

    Does it matter? I have an extremely hard time seeing such a patent holding up in court. Especially considering the exhaustive list of wedge shaped laptops, lids, bottoms, etc, etc that could be show existing well before this patent or even Air line itself.

    • flip-mode
    • 7 years ago

    My Asus laptop that I bought December 2008 is wedge shaped. Apple: Eff you, you effing jerks.

      • demani
      • 7 years ago

      The trouble with trying to show prior art is that “prior” is important: the MBA was introed in [i<]January[/i<] 2008. Not saying that a patent on this shape is a good idea (really, I'd call it a trademark) but let's at least be honest here-when did your Asus model hit the market?

        • kc77
        • 7 years ago

        [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:ASUS_Eee_PC_PIC_0971.JPG<]Asus EEE Netbook [/url<]was demoed in 2007 and released in Taiwan. It was most definitely a wedge clam shell design. It wasn't nearly as thin, but the overall wedge shape was the same. Looking at the picture Apple's not patenting the back/height (thinness) of the machine . It's trying to patent the wedge shape that would exist naturally for any tapering laptop/netbook lid. What makes Apple so insidious is that they take shapes or designs that have been done before and refines them which is perfectly fine. However, they then try to patent it like the overall shape or function hasn't been done before. They'll round of a corner of a square and call it new. If Apple came out with something on their own that didn't involve someone else's design I wouldn't mind them so much. However, they take the ideas of others and market them as something new, which I can't stand. Think about the Apple iTV that I'm sure will hit soon. How long has Sony, Google, and even Microsoft had actual products in the marketplace that Apple is now trying to replicate.... I mean refine? Forever. Yet that product will release and Apple's marketing will take over. I'll have to stomach some irritating person on the Today show holding a remote and telling me that it has changed the way TV's work because the buttons are aluminum and they glow.

    • Deanjo
    • 7 years ago

    I hope everything gets patented to the point where the gov’ts can’t ignore how broken the system is causing it to be entirely scrapped and nullified.

      • khands
      • 7 years ago

      Kinda already there.

    • adisor19
    • 7 years ago

    I feel like Oprah on this thread : Every body gets a dooooooooooooowwwwwwnnnn vooooooooote !

    Adi

    Edit : with a few exceptions.

      • 5150
      • 7 years ago

      I wish you felt like a tree and would leave.

    • ALiLPinkMonster
    • 7 years ago

    lol @ Apple. Don’t they make enough money? It’s not like anyone is going to choose an Air over a competitor just because it’s shaped like a wedge, so really all they’re doing is creating potential lawsuits for no good reason.

    Only in America.

      • demani
      • 7 years ago

      Actually, its probably so they can go after the cheap Chinese knockoffs (some have been close enough that people DID think they were MBAs and took them into the Apple Store for service.

    • bender
    • 7 years ago

    Why is this even on TR? This is like flame bait in a comments thread. This isn’t news.

    Besides, at least do some research before you start pontificating on the greatness of Apple and their ‘invention’ of the wedge-shaped laptop. This article feels like Apple wrote it and paid to have it published here. This site typically does a lot better than: run it; this will generate a bunch of clicks. What drivel.

    Pretty disappointing TR.

      • ALiLPinkMonster
      • 7 years ago

      You’re overreacting. All he did was inform us of a current, relevant situation in the computing world and give his opinion on the matter. That opinion wasn’t particularly pro- or anti- Apple, just an observation of a possible outcome. Nowhere in the article did he rave about how awesome Apple is, nor did he condemn them.

        • 5150
        • 7 years ago

        True, please refer to Jason’s blog posts if you want to read about how awesome Apple is.

          • ALiLPinkMonster
          • 7 years ago

          Haha yeah, but to be fair it’s pretty much his job to be an Apple fanboy.

        • adisor19
        • 7 years ago

        Up vote for you, kind sir.

        Adi

          • 5150
          • 7 years ago

          Did I miss the memo that we have to reply and state our name when voting for someone?

          Down vote for you, Adi.

          5150

            • adisor19
            • 7 years ago

            Hey, at least you finally read the memo.

            Adi

        • bender
        • 7 years ago

        “PC makers have been shamelessly ripping off Apple for years” (open bracket)
        “the patent will encourage PC vendors to adopt more original designs” (close bracket)

        Again, please research the wedge-shaped laptops that came well before the Air.

        And no, this isn’t relevant. If you’ll notice, the other commentators in this thread are mostly complaining about the patent system for the most part, not whether or not they’ll be able to get wedge-shaped laptops from another vendor. And I’ll wager that pretty much no one here actually designs laptops.

        Aren’t there multiple trade shows happening right now? There’s nothing new being presented at those? This is just a grab for more ‘Apple patented the rectangle’ posts.

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    How are these patents even being approved?

    My three-year-old Dell Studio is the [i<]very definition[/i<] of wedge design. SRSLY, every time I see an article like this, I shrug it off as unlikely to ever see the light of day because [b<]YOU WOULD HAVE TO BE AN INCREDIBLY IGNORANT, UNINFORMED IMBECILE[/b<] to grant any of these patents. Does prior art mean nothing to the USPTO?! Sad truth, other countries completely ignore US patents because most of the time they're [b<]RIDICULOUS.[/b<]

      • Alexko
      • 7 years ago

      Forget about prior art, how can you even patent a shape? That’s completely preposterous.

        • chuckula
        • 7 years ago

        It’s called a design patent and it is for non-functional ornamentation on the shape of the notebook.

          • khands
          • 7 years ago

          Yeah, its how the clothing industry survives.

            • Arclight
            • 7 years ago

            aaand this is relevant to all industries or notebooks per say because?

            • clone
            • 7 years ago

            because the clothing industry can’t patent designs….. much like laptop shapes should not be patentable.

            on a side note this is yet another example of why the patent industry hurts not helps the industry …. if it’s allowed.

          • Alexko
          • 7 years ago

          I’d be fine with it if they were just protecting the exact shape and design of their products, but patenting any computer that looks like a wedge is just ridiculous.

        • mutarasector
        • 7 years ago

        A generic shape can’t be patented. If Apple ever tried to push litigation over this “patent”, there’s a darn good chance the patent could (and would) be tossed out. Bad/dumb patents get issued all the time only to be later determined as flawed patents

        A design incorporating a generic shape can be protected under trade dress laws, however. That would be the most likely course Apple would take as well given their litigative history.

          • faramir
          • 7 years ago

          Right, because Apple didn’t succeed with their “minimalistic black rectangle” lawsuit either. Oh, wait …

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            yeah, NOBODY MAKE A SQUARE PHONE.

      • demani
      • 7 years ago

      Again- so it’s three years old: the MBA was introed almost 4-1/2 years ago. So it was the definition of wedge before the Dell Studio was.

        • Chrispy_
        • 7 years ago

        The XPS M1330 is 5 years old, and it’s the same wedge shape.

        It doesn’t matter who made it or when they made it, Apple are trying to patent something that someone else made first, probably so that they can try and sue them for having made it in the first place.

        Defend them if you must, but please note that RDF syndrome is no longer a valid excuse for your lunacy.

          • ludi
          • 7 years ago

          Take a closer look at the patent illustrations. Apple isn’t claiming ownership of every design that could have ever been used as a functional doorstop. If you follow the “hard” lines in those illustrations you can see there are several design curves that someone would have to be copying quite deliberately in order to replicate.

          Speaking by analogy, Apple isn’t trying to trademark the bottle simply because it has a wide base and a narrow neck, they’re trying to trademark the Coke bottle with its distinctive and artistic design curves. It’s not exactly a new or novel concept in the history of industrial design and its relationship to IP law.

          I have my own concerns and complaints about the state of global and US intellectual property law, but you’re not going to get the change you want when you BLUSTER IN ALLCAPS and yet don’t even understand what a given instance of IP protection is actually guaranteeing, versus what it is now, or how it might be modified in a legal challenge.

      • WillBach
      • 7 years ago

      It’s a design patent, which is for a particular look, not a “real” patent. Also, the patent cites the Sony Viao X505 as an “other publication”, which is wedge-shaped laptop, so I don’t think it’s about the wedge design. When I read it, I thought the diagrams seemed focused on the curved, “super compressed dome” aspect of the lid, and the gradually sloping nature of the bottom. As I said elsewhere, those are more novel (and can be applied less broadly if patented) than a regular geometric wedge, and they’re also part of why the MacBook Air is so comfortable to hold in the hand.

      IANAL

      • can-a-tuna
      • 7 years ago

      US is a ridiculous country. You can sue a company if their coffee burns your tongue. And of course they are very protective with their own companies like Apple and grant them pretty much whatever they want.

      • albundy
      • 7 years ago

      easy, they pay some fidiot under the table in cash to pass this through. lobbying works the same way.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 7 years ago

      The Patent office is understaffed, underfunded, and over worked. They just grant patents basically unless someone sues about it.

    • brute
    • 7 years ago

    apple fans have their panties twisted into the mother of all knots on this page

      • Philldoe
      • 7 years ago

      No kidding. We need to spray some mac-b-gone around this place.

      • Shambles
      • 7 years ago

      It’s these kind of Apple drinking kool-aid articles that stop me from taking this website seriously. While there is great work done on this site the apple-blinders that the editors wear can be a trial to endure as a reader. At first I thought they were just pandering to Apple for the website clicks but I’ve come to realize they really do buy into a lot of this kind of garbage. Still, when it comes to hardware they’re one of the best sites out there.

        • EtherealN
        • 7 years ago

        I think you read the article, had some weird alien brainfilter virus scientology thing applied to you, and took it 180 degrees backwards.

          • ALiLPinkMonster
          • 7 years ago

          All three of them seem to have done that.

        • Kurkotain
        • 7 years ago

        Somebody’s sarcarm, irony and humor detector is horribly broken.
        If you read that post, and took that as the message that was intended, then clearly you are on the wrong website.

      • ALiLPinkMonster
      • 7 years ago

      Really? Because most of the comments are against Apple.

        • EtherealN
        • 7 years ago

        For good reason.

    • GreatGooglyMoogly
    • 7 years ago

    Isn’t that Intel’s design , really? I thought Apple had exclusive access to Intel’s hardware platform that made it possible to make laptops this thin for a bunch of years. (Well, Sony and Samsung made their own designs too before the Ultrabooks, since those two companies have their own manufacturing capabilities, but they weren’t as powerful.)

    • 5150
    • 7 years ago

    Oh darn. Now if I want a laptop with minimum expandability or ports I HAVE to buy Apple.

      • EtherealN
      • 7 years ago

      Just remember that having your options removed costs you…

    • Philldoe
    • 7 years ago

    I’m going to patent a plastic rod shaped like a phallus. I will own this world.

      • brute
      • 7 years ago

      philldoe?
      dildo?

        • phileasfogg
        • 7 years ago

        no, Steely Dan.

        • bthylafh
        • 7 years ago

        Are you fourteen? Go away.

          • 5150
          • 7 years ago

          So you have a problem with the word “dildo” but not “phallus”?

            • bthylafh
            • 7 years ago

            Not at all. That’s about his general immaturity.

            • brute
            • 7 years ago

            I’d rather be immature than butthurting over a stranger on the internet.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            Somehow I find this argument compelling.

            • Meadows
            • 7 years ago

            As do I. </Templar>

            • Bensam123
            • 7 years ago

            I think immaturity goes both ways. Finding the slightest sexual reference offensive and always trying to make everything a sexual reference.

            • lilbuddhaman
            • 7 years ago

            His comment was funny, in my humble man-child opinion.

          • brute
          • 7 years ago

          No, but I can post like I am.

          do u no wat i mean?

      • kyboshed
      • 7 years ago

      I’m pretty sure there’s a lot of prior art for that one 🙂

      • xtalentx
      • 7 years ago

      Does this item you are going to patent rhyme with your name?

    • tbone8ty
    • 7 years ago

    in other news. Apple patents air, wind, and fire

      • rhysl
      • 7 years ago

      You forgot Earth ..

      Apple are douchbags ! Never ever will I buy an Apple product … oh wait the apples in the bowl at home !.. drat!

      I bet Apple will try and patent the ” Apple “!

        • no51
        • 7 years ago

        They would patent heart, but it seems that they don’t have any.

        /captainplanet

        • Arclight
        • 7 years ago

        I wonder, would they call it iEarth or iSphere

        Edit
        he forgot earth and water

        but wait

        You will find plenty of both down there….THIS IS SPARTA

      • Parallax
      • 7 years ago

      We’ll fight back with water.

      • lilbuddhaman
      • 7 years ago

      in other news: Apple launches satellite to moon, claims ownership. An Apple rep was quoted “We were there first, it is common knowledge that the lunar landing by NASA was faked, Apple however does not fake anything. We will soon be rolling out our new service iTide, allowing for all the world’s tidal currents to be used for the low fee of %5 GDP annually on a per nation basis, discounted plans will be available for developing countries”

    • BobbinThreadbare
    • 7 years ago

    I can’t wait for IBM or whoever made the first laptop to patent “a system by which a device for the displaying of information to a user is connected to a device by which a user can input information by way of a hinge.”

      • khands
      • 7 years ago

      Pretty sure the first laptop patents are expired.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 7 years ago

        Patents last from when filed, right?

        There is a good chance in the 80s no tried to patent such an obvious thing.

          • brute
          • 7 years ago

          Has anyone patented patents?

          I have an idea to get very rich, and I’m not talking about lather

            • 5150
            • 7 years ago

            *snort* LATHER!

    • gecko575
    • 7 years ago

    Good. While I dislike the patent wars, I don’t really want my laptop to be able to double as a door wedge.

    I saw a macbook air in person last week and I really wasn’t impressed with the looks of it. “Meh” is the way I would describe it and I like the look of the macbook pro much better.

    “that’s all I have to say about that”

      • HallsMint
      • 7 years ago

      I appreciate the Forrest Gump reference. That is probably my favorite movie ever

    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    A wedge is like anything up to 90 degrees. If it was a certain angle, I think Apple might have something. But this just looks like every other broad patent that abuses the patent system. About the only thing I could see better then a wedge shape wise is a wave, which could be used for airflow

      • chuckula
      • 7 years ago

      They didn’t patent a wedge, they patented the specific shape of the solid lines in the drawings… which are of the lid and not of the wedge-shape.

        • Bensam123
        • 7 years ago

        Which is a wedge… The solid lines cover the lower part of the case too.

      • brute
      • 7 years ago

      California summers are definitely not wedges. You’re lucky if it’s below 90deg.

    • brute
    • 7 years ago

    I can’t wait till this Apple rots. Maybe they’ll patent water next.

      • dpaus
      • 7 years ago

      I hope they patent the concept of rotting, so that only they can rot.

        • Wirko
        • 7 years ago

        See, [url=http://www.invasive.org/browse/detail.cfm?imgnum=1236186<]apple[/url<] is an invasive species, and Cydia helps a little.

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