A few PSUs stand out in Computex deluge

Computex — We saw a lot of PSUs at this year’s Computex trade show. Every booth seemed to have a few—some of them were even new—and 80 Plus badges were everywhere. To be honest, though, it was hard to get excited. Power supplies are vitally important system components, but there just isn’t a whole lot to talk about in terms of new features and capabilities. That said, a few units caught my eye, including a passively cooled model from Rosewill.

The Silent Night offers 500W of output power and nary a single fan. It’s modular, too, but that’s not the most impressive part. This puppy has 80 Plus Platinum certification, the rating body’s highest standard for non-redundant PSUs. To top it off, Rosewill kicks in a five-year warranty. We don’t have details on pricing or availability, though.

Like most of the PSUs we saw, the Silent Night is an ATX unit. Silverstone had something a little smaller on display at its booth: an SFX model meant for mini PCs.

The midget PSU has a 450W output rating, which isn’t as impressive as its 80 Plus Gold certification. Silverstone already makes a 450W SFX PSU, but that model only won Bronze in the 80 Plus Olympics. The company claims this new unit is the first SFX model to meet the Gold standard’s efficiency targets.

Unlike the old SFX unit, the new one is fully modular, a godsend for small-form-factor systems. Expect the PSU to be available in July for $80-90.

At the other end of the spectrum, we saw a bunch of high-wattage PSUs. The most interesting was Corsair’s AX1200i, which delivers 1200W using all-digital power circuitry. This is Corsair’s first digital PSU, and the company was keen to talk about the benefits: fewer components, better ripple control, and no resistance from the DSP. Using a DSP allows Corsair to plug the AX1200i into its Corsair Link software, which offers all kinds of monitoring and control options.The DSP also enables an integrated self-test feature that needs only a wall outlet—no system required.

Corsair says the AX1200i is certified 80 Plus Platinum, and not by a small margin. As one might expect, the PSU won’t be cheap. Expect the AX1200i to cost around $350 when it goes on sale in late July or early August.

Comments closed
    • Derfer
    • 7 years ago

    Not sure what to make of that Silverstone. Looks the same as the micro atx FSP units Lian Li has started using in their case. Those units don’t have good reviews on noise/reliability. Whoever the real OEM is I hope Silverstone requested some serious customizations.

    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    I think we’ve seen embarrassingly few PSU roundups since the inception of ‘the beast’… >>

    • UberGerbil
    • 7 years ago

    If that Corsair thing takes off for more mainstream PSUs we’re headed toward a world with a separate PSU BIOS that we can tweak (and perhaps are required to flash with updates?) Does the PSU also have dedicated sockets to control fans, so we can have yet another fan control interface to complain about?

      • rrr
      • 7 years ago

      It most certainly won’t take off for mainstream due to extra costs.

      Still, that might be a perfect PSU overall, sporting 80+ Platinum and semi-fanless operation.

        • UberGerbil
        • 7 years ago

        A lot of things that were too expensive for the mainstream initially ended up being mainstream features. Costs come down with volumes and integration and time. It won’t be a [i<]budget[/i<] or "value" feature, because by definition those categories strip every non-essential thing (and sometimes fairly essential ones), but if it proves popular / valuable enough for users, it'll find its way down the price ladder. (Though I am skeptical about it becoming popular or valuable enough for that to happen). Anyway, that was just a jumping-off point for me to wonder at the idea of PSU BIOS user interfaces and having to flash them for fixes.

    • Sargent Duck
    • 7 years ago

    That Rosewell IS exciting. 500watts is more than enough for most systems (at least for anything I’ve ever built) and with the platinum certification and totally passive? That’s a win in my books.

      • jpostel
      • 7 years ago

      I’m attempting a case fan only (or no fan) build and got a Seasonic 460 fanless (80+ gold). I would like to see some more options in the 500 range because I don’t think most enthusiasts will build with less than 500 unless they are going with no video card.

        • OneArmedScissor
        • 7 years ago

        I would use a case fan and plug it into the CPU header. You’re not going to hear it if you pick a good one, but it could save you from an unfortunate incident such as some program bugging out and running your CPU up to 100% without you knowing it.

          • jpostel
          • 7 years ago

          That is a great idea, and you get a thumbs up for it. Thanks much.

        • cynan
        • 7 years ago

        The [url=http://www.seasonicusa.com/X.htm<]Seasonic X-series are[/url<] pretty good at staying silent. They have a switch on the unit where the fan can be set to only come on when required (depending on the model) -which is not very often if the case is well ventilated and it's not being pushed hard, or to have the fan on all the time, offering flexibility for different applications. And they come in higher power ratings. This design makes the most sense to me for an enthusiast. If offers quiet operation when doing light work or media viewing, but still has the power for gaming with overclocked components, etc.

      • rrr
      • 7 years ago

      Not that exciting since it’s been available since a while under Kingwin (Stryker) or Superflower’s own names (as Golden Silent in latter case)

      • flip-mode
      • 7 years ago

      It Rosewell above the competition? All’s well that Rosewell?

    • cegras
    • 7 years ago

    The rosewill unit looks like a kingwin, a.k.a. superflower.

      • Gershwin
      • 7 years ago

      It looks virtually identical to the KingWin Stryker which appears to have been around since at least early 2012.

      [url=http://www.amazon.com/KingWin-Stryker-500-Watt-Fanless-STR-500/dp/B005CM8V4I/<]Amazon Link[/url<]

        • Ihmemies
        • 7 years ago

        Which is basically a Super Flower (the manufacturer of the PSU). I’ve used one since christmas with 3,2GHz i7 920 and HD6970 2GB. No problems so far.

        [url<]http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/SuperFlower/SF-500P14FG/[/url<] [url<]http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story&reid=244[/url<]

    • MadManOriginal
    • 7 years ago

    They should have just called it the ‘iPSU’ and gotten the Apple bandwagoning over with.

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