AMD shows upcoming dual-GPU card

AFDS — In his end-of-AFDS keynote today, AMD’s Mark Papermaster showed an impressive-looking professional graphics card with a triple-fan cooler. Papermaster referred to the card as the FirePro W9000, which is meant to be a top-of-the-line, Tahiti-based product (think a pro version of the Radeon HD 7970). The W9000’s specs are detailed in the following slide:

There’s just one problem. The card in Papermaster’s hands looked quite a bit different:

On my way to the airport this afternoon, I asked AMD’s Dave Erskine for clarification. He told me the card Papermaster held up was actually a "dual-GPU product that will be released later this year." That’s all Erskine said. Based on the size of the cooler and the launch time frame, though, it’s probably safe to assume this bad boy’s dual GPUs will be of the Tahiti variety.

Which, of course, raises the question: will we see a consumer dual-Tahiti card? I’d say that’s fairly likely, given that AMD evidently has a PCB and a cooler ready, and Nvidia recently rolled out its GeForce GTX 690 with dual Kepler GPUs. AMD could always choose to restrict the dual-Tahiti solution to its professional lineup, but it may just as well unleash a Radeon HD 7970 X2 in the not-too-distant future. Keep your eyes peeled.

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    • flip-mode
    • 7 years ago

    Papermaster kinda looks like Robert Englund.

    • Arclight
    • 7 years ago

    Papermaster talking about launching new cards? O the puns, where art thou?

    • willmore
    • 7 years ago

    I know this is a little off topic, but who thinks he should be wearing a bow-tie?

      • HallsMint
      • 7 years ago

      Now that I’m thinking about it, he definitely looks like the bow tie kind of guy

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      Why not? Bow ties are cool.

        • Arclight
        • 7 years ago

        Yes, like clowns…….

          • superjawes
          • 7 years ago

          *The Reference*

          *Your Head*

            • Arclight
            • 7 years ago

            [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MrR9CFQ1Yo[/url<] Does not get the "your head". Not sure if funny or not

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      incoming meadows post:

      “who thinks he should be wearing nothing? “

      • HighTech4US2
      • 7 years ago

      Bow Ties are cool

      [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vPGTizdGwSc[/url<]

    • Goty
    • 7 years ago

    Just for clarification (both for the author and others posting here), 7990 != 7970 X2. If AMD follows their naming scheme in the slightest, the 7990 will be the “official” dual-Tahiti part, consisting of underclocked/cut-down Tahiti parts while AIBs should be releasing their own, fully-fledged parts consisting of two fully functional Tahiti chips.

    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    NOOOOO! AMD don’t buy into the bullshit. You designed a good cooler, don’t use the shitty ones your third party GPU manufacturers do. You moved away from those for a reason.

      • Arclight
      • 7 years ago

      What are you on about? Generally speaking all aftermarket coolers are better than stock. Exceptions exist (when they intentionally make smaller one slot variants) but the majority of cases confirm what i’m saying.

      The sole area where some custom coolers fail is VRM cooling which some don’t cover at all (past Twin Frozr II coolers for example, though excellent at cooling the GPU it didn’t cover the VRMs).

        • Bensam123
        • 7 years ago

        There are all sorts of variables you aren’t taking into account, for instance the material the heatsink is made out of. Apples to apples comparison, applying more fans without venting to the outside will simply increase internal ambient temperatures and increase noise levels.

        We’re looking at the impact of adding more fans vs venting to the outside.

          • Arclight
          • 7 years ago

          That’s such an old an false argument. Who the hell has a GTX 680 DirectCu card and installs it in a case with only one fan? This is mind bogglingly stupid. No no no. All who can afford cards with good custom or aftermarket cooler have a case with good case ventilation.

            • rrr
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]This is mind bloglining stupid.[/quote<] Hey, stop it, my mind lines up some blogs too!

            • Bensam123
            • 7 years ago

            Uh, anyone who is making a SFF PC and wants to use it for gaming.

            That’s not an old argument at all and hardly untrue. You’re just hell bent on making it seem like recirculating air in the lower part of your case is a good idea. You see the difference between what I’m saying and what you’re saying too? In order for your version to work, you have to have a good case and a good aftermarket cooler… My version needs neither of those.

      • flip-mode
      • 7 years ago

      When did AMD ever “move away” from multi-fan coolers? They’ve never had one before so I’m not seeing how they could have moved away from it.

        • Bensam123
        • 7 years ago

        I’m speaking of coolers that vented inside the case vs ones that didn’t.

          • flip-mode
          • 7 years ago

          Still, AMD has never tried the large interior vented cooler approach, so they never moved away from it. Radeons went from small coolers on the x800 XT to the single-fan-externally-vented X1800 XT and they’ve been single-fan-externally-vented ever since on their high end cards.

          Anyway, I suppose its case temps you’re worried about, yes? These large multi-fan coolers have proven to cool the GPU much more effectively and quietly than the single-fan externally-vented coolers, so I hope it’s not GPU temps that you’re concerned about.

            • Zoomer
            • 7 years ago

            Not in tightly packed environments, and/or less than superbly ventilated cases. Like pretty much all oem cases.

            Two of the non ducted fan cooled cards with 1 slot of separation between them would have them easily hit 100 deg C.

            • flip-mode
            • 7 years ago

            OEM’s solve those problems themselves if they decide to support the product. If an OEM includes such a card as a configurable option then it’s going to work or it’s going to get returned. If you’re trying to add this card to an OEM machine that doesn’t support it then you can’t blame any issues that arise on the card.

            The cooler will work well in the configurations that it’s designed for. The large cooler will allow lower temps and higher clocks for dual GPU boards. AMD isn’t “buying into hype” with such a cooler. I hate being pedantic but it’s absurd to say that such coolers are nothing but hype. They’re extremely effective in the right situations. For other situations there will be other cards.

            • Bensam123
            • 7 years ago

            You say as if you have ‘proof’, but you don’t. You can’t simply offer a comparison between a stock heatsink and a third party heatsink. That is not a apples to apples comparison. What are the heatsinks made out of? What sort of ambient airflow has to be present? How many heatpipes do they have? How big are the heatsinks?

            Like I said, you aren’t using a apples to apples approach. I’m talking purely of the method of dealing with the hot air. Blowing it out of the case verse recirculating it in the case. All else has to be equal to compare the two.

            And yes, a huge component of how well a three fan circulater performs is how much airflow is inside the case. You can’t simply say ‘everyone and their mother has well vented cases lolol’ because that’s simply not true. You know it’s not true, that’s why you’re trying to discard it.

            That is the whole premise of why I believe a blower that blows out of the case is superior to a three fan design that recirculates. Because it DOES remove the hot air from the case and isn’t DEPENDENT on the case to do it for the card. A lot of prebuilt computers use one or two 80mm fans too. Like a dell for instance. They shove the low end cards and the high end ones in the same chassis.

    • brucethemoose
    • 7 years ago

    Wait, so is that a dual GPU professional product?

    If this were a Tesla/FireStream card, build solely for GPGPU, that would make sense. But making drivers that work with professional applications is already hard enough: throwing CrossfireX into the mix would be a disaster.

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      Sli has been present on quadro cards for quite a while. In reality it is probably a lot easier to get sli/crossfire working properly on professional apps given that they are not all about eyecandy, their rendering routines stay fairly stagnant and the number of applications they have to profile for is relatively small.

      SLI and crossfire are far more suited for professional applications then they are for gaming.

        • rrr
        • 7 years ago

        Actually, compute applications don’t even require SLI/CF, that’s why you see people with >4 GPUs for folding or bitcoin mining.

          • Deanjo
          • 7 years ago

          I didn’t mention anything about GPGPU but you are correct that a sli/crossfire is not needed as each GPU operates independently. The professional type apps that I was referring to would be apps like pro/E, Maya, etc.

          • brucethemoose
          • 7 years ago

          this.

        • ish718
        • 7 years ago

        Yeah, Video game/ 3D Graphics developers should be very pleased with this, granted drivers work correctly O_O

    • MadManOriginal
    • 7 years ago

    Nothing says ‘professional’ to me like 4 different fonts and a word in all caps flying out the exhaust of a graphics card.

      • pedro
      • 7 years ago

      +1 for the laughs.

      • gigafinger
      • 7 years ago

      It doesn’t [i<]say[/i<] "professional", it [b<]SCREAMS[/b<] it.

        • superjawes
        • 7 years ago

        Needs more Comic Sans.

      • Farting Bob
      • 7 years ago

      Are they expecting me to seriously consider a new graphics card without a half naked girl carrying a gun that weighs more than her stuck onto the front of the card???

        • Goty
        • 7 years ago

        It’s a brave new world we live in.

    • Waco
    • 7 years ago

    Maybe I’m retarded…but haven’t AIB vendors been showing off their dual Tahiti designs for a few weeks now?

      • modulusshift
      • 7 years ago

      Oh, yes, but they’re really just crossfire of two 7970’s in a single card. This is probably going to be the 7990, which is two 7970 GPUs, probably slowed down a bit, put into crossfire by AMD directly. So, a bit worse, but probably considerably cheaper. Which is a hilarious thing to consider when you’re throwing money at a dual-GPU card anyhow.

    • PrincipalSkinner
    • 7 years ago

    What a silly looking device he is holding. Looks like a toy that clowns use.

      • Metonymy
      • 7 years ago

      He was just trying to clarify the whole “three fans” thing.

    • danny e.
    • 7 years ago

    design things better and use one fan. not three. then you wont have all the varied extra noise from small changes in pitch, ect.

    one fan + design > three fans.

    after all, do you really think you’d get anywhere with “sure it’s small and doesn’t work quite right, but I have three of them!”

      • chµck
      • 7 years ago

      what would you suggest?

        • danny e.
        • 7 years ago

        something like nVidia did & blow the hot air out back.

          • internetsandman
          • 7 years ago

          Keep in mind those central fan solutions only blow half the air out the back, while the other half is blown straight to the front of the case internals. Multi fan designs like these have been proven time and time again to reduce temperatures and noise levels over any single fan design, at the cost of slightly higher case temps, but I think you’ll find most enthusiasts will agree that that’s a tradeoff they’re willing to make

            • Bensam123
            • 7 years ago

            I don’t think ‘slightly higher’ is right at all. Depending on how much airflow you have going through your case. I could see a GPU that doesn’t blow hot air out the back in a SFF PC causing it to implode.

            Then again some people seem to think more fans is better there too, instead of engineering them for ample airflow.

            • xeridea
            • 7 years ago

            This monster isn’t going into a SFF….

            I just have case on its side, with side panel off an a small desk fan blowing over 3 GPUs for GPGPU. I took out my case fans since side is usually off anyway, and before I had multi-gpu, I left side on, and heat went up and out giant grill.

            Enthusiasts who will be buying this card have good cases with good airflow, so its kind of a non issue.

            • Bensam123
            • 7 years ago

            Just because you can attach a box fan to the side of your case and it increases airflow doesn’t mean it’s a better design.

            • cynan
            • 7 years ago

            Yeah. With something like the parallel 3-fan design, you get high static pressure across most of the surface area of the heat sink fins. With a single blower style cooler, you can only get high static pressure over much less surface area.

            There is just no way a blower style cooler can be designed to provide the same cooling performance as efficiently, at least not with standard heat sink configs. If you have really horrible ventilation/airflow in your case, however, this may end up doing as much harm as good. But in general, the 3-fan design wins.

            • danny e.
            • 7 years ago

            “like” != “same as”.

            multi fan designs will most certainly not reduce noise at the same rpms.
            blocking the air at the back certainly won’t help exhaust the hot air though.

            • EtherealN
            • 7 years ago

            I’m not an expert here, but my understanding is that part of the idea of multi-fan designs is that you are able to run them at lower rpm’s and still move the same amount of air. Thus, comparing them to “same rpms” is disingenious. Obviously, if someone can point me to a source that falsified this I’d be very interested.

            What is interesting when it comes to noise in cooling solutions is this: how much heat do you transport away, and how loud is it. The fans are there to transport heat, not to be an ornament (though sometimes I do wonder 😛 ), and there’s many ways to do this. Run one fan really really fast, or run several fans slower. Either solution can be noisy, but since noise is often (and again, someone correct me if I’m wrong) a non-linear function of fan speed, running multiple fans slowly would seem to be the best way to go about it.

            This does of course require that the cooling assembly is actually made to be quiet though. A bad three-fan solution can be just as loud as a blower. But a good three-fan solution can be quieter than a blower specifically because it can run each fan slower.

        • Bensam123
        • 7 years ago

        The coolers they’ve been using.

          • flip-mode
          • 7 years ago

          I’m betting they’ll still use those on cards that don’t need so much cooling.

        • Kaleid
        • 7 years ago

        2 or 3 12cm fans. Larger cooler a la Arctic Cooling S1

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]"sure it's small and doesn't work quite right, but I have three of them!"[/quote<] It got me pretty far with your mom last night, Trebek!

        • Yeats
        • 7 years ago

        I rarely LOL, but I LOL’d at this. +1 to ya.

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