Release roundup: Cooler Master, Eurocom, Sharkoon, and Super Talent

In the wake of Computex, big launches are usually followed by smaller ones—and, in some cases, availability of products we saw at the show. This week, our inbox collected several announcements from the first category:

  • Cooler Master unveils full-tower Storm Stryker case. Despite its relatively reasonable $159.99 price tag (reasonable by high-end enthusiast case standards, that is), the Storm Stryker doesn’t skimp on bells and whistles. There’s a 2.5″ drive dock at the front, two modular hard-drive cages (each outfitted with a 120-mm fan), space for 14 hard drives in total, mounting points for an XL-ATX motherboard, a built-in fan controller, and a bottom panel that “removes to reveal a storage drawer to keep private effects safe from prying eyes until they are needed.” The case also has white LEDs, a windowed left panel, and an “ultra-strong carrying handle” for easy transport. Considering the amount of hardware you can jam in there, though, a dolly would probably work better. Look for the Storm Stryker in stores later this month.

  • Eurocom’s Monster is a 4-lb, 11.6″ mobile workstation. Most of Eurocom’s notebooks seem to be heavy, bulky affairs, but the Monster 1.0 is different. It weighs just under four pounds, has a 11.6″ display, and purportedly achieves 6.8 hours of battery life. Don’t let those numbers fool you, though: the system can be configured with some very high-end hardware, including a quad-core Intel Core i7-3920XM processor clocked at 2.9GHz, Nvidia GeForce GTX 650M 2GB discrete graphics, up to 16GB of DDR3-1600 memory, and up to 1TB of storage capacity. Eurocom boasts that the Monster 1.0 can run eight virtual machines at once. With that combination of CPU and GPU, I expect it’s a decent gaming machine, too. Pricing starts at $825 for the base config, which has a dual-core CPU and otherwise tamer specs.

  • Sharkoon lets the DarkGlider gaming mouse loose. Sharkoon is probably better known on the other side of the pond—I’m not seeing many of its products listed at major U.S. e-tailers. Still, the company’s new DarkGlider gaming mouse is probably worth a look if you can find it. The device features a 6,000-DPI laser sensor with a 11,750 Hz sampling rate and 30 G’s of maximum acceleration. Sharkoon equips the rodent with five ceramic feet, four removable weights, and ten buttons, including a dual-axis scroll wheel and a DPI selector. There’s even 256KB of built-in memory for storing up to five user profiles. Asking price: €39.99, which works out to about 50 bucks. Not bad at all.

  • Super Talent intros USB 3.0 Express ST2 series. USB 3.0 thumb drives have become increasingly commonplace lately, and Super Talent has had a hand in that: the firm says it’s introduced no fewer than 10 of them so far. The latest one is the USB 3.0 Express ST2, which the company touts as an “affordable high capacity 2 channel USB 3.0 drive.” It has a top read speed of 67MB/s, and it’s available in blue or red with a “retractable, cap less housing” that rotates to retract the USB connector.

You know, it’s usually hard to be excited by Eurocom’s announcements, but reading about the Monster 1.0 this morning made for a pleasant surprise. It’s not everyday you see that much power crammed into such a portable machine. I wonder what the build quality is like.

Comments closed
    • drfish
    • 7 years ago

    The Monster is actually the Clevo W110ER that seemingly everyone is rebranding these days. Its an awesome system (I’m typing this on one) but 6.8 hours of battery life is laughable no matter which CPU you put in it. Expect 3.5 hours max with light use. All of us owners are still crossing our fingers for a BIOS or driver update that addresses the issue…

      • Chrispy_
      • 7 years ago

      So with 90W of CPU+GPU, this thing will last 90 minutes, tops?

      I had my doubts it would be cool or quiet, but can I ask what CPU/GPU you have in yours (with the 3.5h battery life)?

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    Eurocom’s Monster:
    [quote<] "It's not everyday you see that much power crammed into such a portable machine."[/quote<] That'll be hot and noisy trying to cool 90W in such a small form factor; 55W for the CPU and 45W for the 650M I'd take a 35W trinity in an 11.6" with a 768p screen though. I wish vendors would understand that many people don't want extremes, we want middle ground; It seems you can get "woefully underpowered" or "hot, cramped, noisy, no battery life" Where's the reasoning in any of that?

      • grantmeaname
      • 7 years ago

      Eurocom can only produce that product because it an Alienware have the niche all to themselves. For the HP and Asus of the world, it’s not worth it to go into a teensy market like that.

    • mikehodges2
    • 7 years ago

    “the system can be configured with some very high-end hardware…Nvidia GeForce GTX 650M”

    Granted this is the 2GB version, but weren’t people calling that GPU anemic on the new macbook?

    Is the 2GB one more potent or something?

      • internetsandman
      • 7 years ago

      The 1GB version doesn’t have nearly enough RAM to push all those pixels in an intensive scenario. Most of the work being done on Macs relies more on the CPU as far as I know, but in terms of gaming for example, trying to run at the native res would be very difficult without turning all detail options down as low as they go. This 2GB version is meant to be plugged into monitors that have slightly fewer pixels (2560×1440/1600), and with the higher VRAM, the pixel pushing horsepower is certainly there now.

      A GPU should only be called anemic, in my mind, if its too weak to perform the main task(s) it’s being implemented for (a 5450 isn’t anemic for a basic home theater, but it is for gaming, for example)

    • Corrado
    • 7 years ago

    That case looks very similar to the Storm Scout I have. Theres no fans on the HD bays, and no rubber grommets on the cutouts in the bottom of the tray, but other than that its pretty much the same with slightly differing plastics. I paid $65 with a $15 rebate at MicroCenter and I got the rebate 3 weeks later. $50 for a ‘high end’ case is a hell of a deal, really.

      • UltimateImperative
      • 7 years ago

      It’s basically a white version of the Storm Trooper, the Scout’s big brother — apart from color and the side panel, there are few differences. In fact, you can use a Stryker’s side panel on the Trooper.

    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    I didn’t even look at the mouse, but for the price that’s pretty spiffy. Sorta deceptive that they list ‘sampling’ and add a Hz number to it, but they don’t list ‘polling’ which is what USB does. Makes it look like it does 11,750Hz over USB. Sorta pointless too seeing as USB is stuck at 1,000Hz. USB 2 at least, I don’t know if that can be changed in USB 3.

      • Bensam123
      • 7 years ago

      Looking at this more and more, for $50 it’s almost a steal for the optics and it looks like it has pretty good aesthetics. It uses a different sensor then either Razer or Logitech mice too, which is good. This might be a replacement for my aging Lachesis. Unfortunately there are absolutely no stores that carry it. D:

        • Bensam123
        • 7 years ago

        Sweet, you can order it from amazon germany. ><

        [url<]http://www.amazon.de/Sharkoon-DarkGlider-Gaming-Laser-10-Tasten/dp/B00889SA2K/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1340322680&sr=8-1[/url<]

    • glacius555
    • 7 years ago

    That Sharkoon rodent should fit well with a cheap 27″ IPS panel from Korea.

    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    You know, looking at their laptop webpage I never understood why laptop makers always force you to look through their ‘line’ of laptops.

    Maybe it’s just me? But I rather pick out all the specs THEN figure out what kind of chassis it fits in. It’s almost the reverse of how makers make you choose your product today. I think it’s entirely possible to do it that way too. Call it ‘advanced builder’ or whatever. Have a list that sorts components based on what laptop model they fit into and narrow down the options with each pick. If people want two different components that aren’t compatible tell them why it’s not possible.

    Not just that, but this would be awesome for gleaning information from the utility to figure out trends and what people want. Such as most built system, not compatible but most desired system, or least used options.

      • willmore
      • 7 years ago

      Every try to look up a specific model at Lenovo’s site to see what the specs are? Good luck. I don’t know what family or target market you think the laptop is, just tell me what a G575 is, please! And, once you wanter throug a bunch of glossy and information free pages to actually find the G575 family, you find out that it’s more a form factor and less a specific hardware platform–it could have any of a half dozen processors in it from either Intel or AMD. And before anyone says ‘did you try the search box?’ Yes, I did and it didn’t find it.

      Acer and Toshiba have nicely organized (by model number) sites. So, this isn’t everyone in the industry who’s doing it wrong.
      </rant>

      [edit] spelling is important

        • Bensam123
        • 7 years ago

        Yeah… that pretty much describes most laptop makers though. Even if they give you a model number up front you still have to wade through pages of customizations just to find out it doesn’t support something you want. Newegg really knows how to organize their information in a way that is conducive to knowledgeable shoppers. Other manufacturers should really take a look at their website.

          • willmore
          • 7 years ago

          Agreed. The features in a nicely selectable/filterable system. Very handy. Plus, their search funtion works.

          I purchased a laptop for my wife not too long ago. I’d watch the sales come up on Fry’s and try to go lookup the manufacturer’s web site to get accurate descriptions of the machines–because Fry’s info is normally vague and unreliable. They will often include info for one laptop in the description of another. I kid you not, they had and AMD Llano processor based laptop that *on the same page* said it had Intel HD graphics. Once I saw that, I make an effort to only rely on information from manufacturers sites. And you know the problems that lead to.

          It’s like they don’t really want to sell machines.

      • ew
      • 7 years ago

      This is the most frustrating thing about buying laptops (and servers). I don’t want to spend 10 minutes figuring out what the difference between the Q, A, Y, B and Bz lines is. All I want is a good feature search across all lines.

        • Bensam123
        • 7 years ago

        Yup… throw all my components in a box, hit mix, and see what pops out. They could even, you know, give you a choice of chassis if there is more then one compatible one too… >>

      • tcunning1
      • 7 years ago

      Absolutely; Sony is a great example of this. It’s crazy what you need to do do find, say, a Dell with a Blu-Ray drive that actually has the other specs you want.

    • dpaus
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]Eurocom's Monster is a 4-lb, 11.6" mobile workstation.[/quote<] First 'feature' proudly listed in the specs: a 1366x768 'HD' resolution - with available glossy screen! OK, OK, on an 11.6", that's actually about right, but still, in the face of the rest of the specs, it kinda grabs you. EDIT: no DisplayPort, though... sigh.

      • Bensam123
      • 7 years ago

      Yeah, you have to add $95 to get a matte. Laptops are almost impossible to use without a matte screen.

        • Airmantharp
        • 7 years ago

        I wouldn’t say impossible, but it’s certainly hard with a high amount of ambient light.

          • Bensam123
          • 7 years ago

          Like being outside or moving around inside… I’m a fan of gloss screens, but they don’t work… like at all… if you can’t control the light sources.

      • internetsandman
      • 7 years ago

      I agree. I don’t know what I was expecting from an 11.6 inch screen, but seeing the rest of those specs made m mind immediately jump to something like a full HD screen. I guess this is more like a desktop replacement, whose main role is to be docked to one or two 30 inch monitors, with the added benefit of fitting into a bag or case you can carry easily and just pull out at a coffee shop or something

        • dpaus
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]this is more like a desktop replacement, whose main role is to be docked to one or two 30 inch monitors[/quote<] That's what it should be, but with a choice of HDMI or VGA outputs, this will never drive even one 30" display, let alone two.

          • internetsandman
          • 7 years ago

          Oh damn, you’re right, I don’t know how that slipped past me. Then….what on earth kind of role is this supposed to fill? I’m not sure there’s many workstations that need that much horsepower and use only a single 20-25″ screen.

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