HDTV maker Vizio has intriguing ultrabooks

I didn’t think much of the news that Vizio was getting into the PC business. The company is best known for its HDTVs, which probably line the shelves of your local Costco and Walmart. A popular line of big-screen TVs doesn’t exactly set up one for success in the PC industry, though.

After reading The Verge’s inside look at the development of Vizio’s PCs, I’m a little more interested. Turns out Vizio is an American company with a pretty clear sense of what it wants to do in the PC space: produce a handful of good products and sell loads of ’em. Vizio is targeting the gap between sub-$600 systems and those living north of $1200. The firm doesn’t want to compete directly with Apple, but it thinks “premium Windows consumers” are ripe for the taking.

Vizio seems to have the right priorities on the product front. “We care about picture quality,” says CTO Matt McRae, who also seems to know a thing or two about what makes a good keyboard and touchpad. Interestingly, Vizio PCs will be sold devoid of unnecessary stickers—something that apparently involved a bit of a battle with Intel and Microsoft. There won’t be any software bloat, either, just a clean copy of Windows with Microsoft Signature certification.

The first PCs to bear Vizio’s name are available for pre-order through the company’s site. Among them, the 14″ ultrabook looks the most intriguing. The $950 base Ivy Bridge configuration comes with a Core i5-3317U CPU, 4GB of RAM, 128GB of solid-state storage, and a 1600×900 display all wrapped in a unibody aluminum enclosure. Upgrade to the 15.6″ version, and the display resolution jumps to 1080p. You’ll have to make do with Intel integrated graphics, though an Nvidia GPU is available on Vizio’s beefier 15-incher, which lacks some of the attributes required for ultrabook status.

While Vizio’s industrial design has clear Cupertino influences, I’ve gotta give it to the company for doing things a little differently than other PC makers. It’s nice to see a lineup devoid of 1366×768 displays, trialware bloat, and excessive stickers—well, one that doesn’t bear Apple’s name, anyway.

Comments closed
    • spigzone
    • 7 years ago

    The two big failings of Microsoft have been fragmentation and design/marketing and it’s looking like they are finally nailing those down.

    The double whammy of Visio’s computer strategy and Microsoft’s Surface initiative plus Microsoft finally unifying their operating systems, development tools, media store and gaming across all their product lines should have Apple on high alert.

    • spigzone
    • 7 years ago

    A couple thousand Wallmart stores putting dedicated Visio computer kiosks in their electronics sections is pretty significant. I don’t know what the terms are but it would be surprising if Wallmart isn’t getting some kind of (time limited) exclusivity with this deal.

    A few years out and Visio might well become firmly entrenched as the ‘Apple’ of the PC world.

    If you’re looking to buy an all-in-one, laptop or ultrabook with apple design and build quality at a much better price point, Visio might become the name that comes to mind.

    • Malphas
    • 7 years ago

    I’d never heard of Vizio prior to this article but I’m very impressed. Finally a computer manufacturer who actually gets what a discerning consumer wants in a machine. Elegant design, no bloatware, no advertising stickers, a few simple product choices, and no cutting corners on low resolution screens, shoddy build quality, etc.

    From looking at their website it really does appear they’re trying to do what Apple are doing but for the Windows PC market. They’re offering just a few different models in each form factor rather than the pointless myriad of different model numbers you see on the usual PC OEM site. And most surprisingly I think their design actually looks slightly [i<]better[/i<] than Apple's current Air does (smaller bezel around the display, bevel around the outside of the lid, subtle "V" logo rather than an obnoxious "look-at-me-I-own-a-mac" Apple logo plastered on the lid) which is a first.

    • Buzzard44
    • 7 years ago

    I’ve got faith in Vizio.

    I proudly purchased a Vizio TV/monitor a couple years back because it was the perfect blend of economical price and nice picture.

    Looks like they’re heading in the same direction for PCs.

    Nice to hear something positive about a PC vendor every once in a while.

    Edit: Man, I sound like I work for Vizio. I don’t.

      • jpostel
      • 7 years ago

      I now have two Vizio TVs. I went looking for a new TV last year and read a couple reviews of Vizio and it seemed like they were the sweet spot for price:quality. When another TV in my house started to act up, I found the replacement Vizio model and it has been great.

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      I do the same thing with recommending them…I think it’s mainly that they make good products, but their name isn’t as well known as your Samsung, Sony, etc.

      But yeah, high value products. Not the best, but some of the best quality per dollar.

    • d0g_p00p
    • 7 years ago

    What can I say? Color me impressed. I hate all those gdamn stickers on Win PC’s. First thing that comes off when I unbox a new machine. Second, again I’m impressed with the choice of Microsoft Signature certification. I recently bought a testing laptop for work and it came with the MSC sticker on it. When I noticed a clean desktop and nothing in the Programs and Features section of the control panel I jumped for joy (not really)

    Why it took a company this long to address the issues of the dumb stickers and complete software bloat is beyond me. Next up is a standard unified connector for case headers and 4-pin PWM on motherboards for all fan headers.

    I can wish right?

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    Someone give this Matt McRae guy a goddamn medal. He’s a hero and I really hope these sell well.

    • Wirko
    • 7 years ago

    Too bad that Vizio hasn’t heard of Europe, and Europe hasn’t heard of Vizio. It’s so refreshing to see a new PC like this one.

    • blastdoor
    • 7 years ago

    These guys seem like they might actually know what they are doing.

    The fact that they had to fight wih Wintel over those stupid stickers, though, is a good symbol of how Microsoft and intel clearly do not know what they’re doing. That’s probably going to be Vizios biggest challenge in selling PCs. It’s not a coincidence that all the other OEMs are brain dead zombies — MS and Intel sucked all the life out of them years ago.

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]"We care about picture quality," says CTO Matt McRae, who also seems to know a thing or two about what makes a good keyboard and touchpad. Interestingly, Vizio PCs will be sold devoid of unnecessary stickers—something that apparently involved a bit of a battle with Intel and Microsoft. There won't be any software bloat, either, just a clean copy of Windows with Microsoft Signature certification.[/quote<] I honestly can't understand why companies that make their living off of making computers are having trouble understanding how simple and insanely desired these traits are. Especially the fact that Intel and Microsoft are fighting a company and punishing a company for DARING not to coat their computer in stickers? I mean, do they really have THAT hard a time looking at Apple and going, "Hai, that's wut they do." I mean, it's just one of those times when I say, "You wonder why you suck and now you know why. Because you ignore most of the awesome little details and copy only the biggest, broadest strokes."

    • riviera74
    • 7 years ago

    The specs are really sweet on their ultrabooks, and the prices are better than I expected ($1249 for their 15.6″ core i7!). I have looked at ultrabooks for the past month and it seemed that the MacBook Air had too many advantages over the ultrabooks because PC makers burden otherwise good hardware with lame software. Only business notebooks such as the HP ProBook and the Lenovo Thinkpad were immune to the crapware problem. Vizio has done what just about everyone else should have done in the last five years: ditch the crapware that no customer really wants just so that PC makers can handle the price wars. The crapware strategy is one that only an accountant and a marketing executive could love, and consumers blame Windows and burden PC help lines with crapware issues. I should know: I had to deal with these calls when I worked the help lines for a PC maker. Macs and business PCs aside, Vizio seems to be the only one who gets it and prices these notebooks sanely.

    One question: when will these be available to see, touch, and buy?

    • guardianl
    • 7 years ago

    I got excited about the 15.6 one until I realized it’s yet another Geforce 640 [b<]LE[/b<] (i.e. re-branded 550). Just one ultrabook with a kepler (GK107) other than MacBooks that I can buy in Canada pretty please?

    • HorseIicious
    • 7 years ago

    Looks like a pretty nice machine. But I’m left with quite a few questions.

    I wonder what type of display is in there, and almost as importantly, if it’s a Glossy or Matte finish? Also, what type of wireless card is in this thing – Intel 6300 would be nice. What version of Bluetooth (doesn’t really matter just curious). How many RAM DIMMs are on the mobo? If there’s more than a single DIMM, does it come stock with both slots fully populated (with 2x2GB)? Either way are the DIMM(s) designed to be standard so-dimm user-serviceable (ie: can I just throw in my own 8GB stick of RAM after market?). What type of SSD is in there?

    With the right answers to these questions this would be a very appealing machine.

      • khands
      • 7 years ago

      Exactly, would love to see a review on each of the models listed here after launch.

        • FuturePastNow
        • 7 years ago

        With the attention this announcement is getting, I think you’ll see plenty of reviews when they launch.

      • Wirko
      • 7 years ago

      Your wondering was obviously inspired by the new MBP, and you’ve forgotten one thing: is the battery glued in its place?

      As for displays, it’s not just matte vs. glossy. Does the display reflect [i<]all[/i<] the sunlight or is it at least trying to absorb some of it, like the LCDs on some compact cameras do? I have yet to see an LCD with a good antireflective coating on a laptop. E: typo

    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    Hmmm… seems they got this partially right. I’m not sure why they’re making it seem like they just popped up out of no where though. Vizio has been around for years and is owned by Sony. If they’ve been doing things like this in the past I don’t see anything significantly changing in the future.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      If by ‘years’ you mean 10 and by ‘owned by Sony’ you mean 23% owned by AmTran, one of their major OEM partners, and 77% privately held, then yeah.

        • Bensam123
        • 7 years ago

        Yeah I was thinking of Vaio. Decade of experience still qualifies though.

      • crabjokeman
      • 7 years ago

      You should just edit the post to say, “NVM.”

    • jdaven
    • 7 years ago

    “Interestingly, Vizio PCs will be sold devoid of unnecessary stickers—something that apparently involved a bit of a battle with Intel and Microsoft”

    This is why I extremely dislike (I am hold myself back from using the word hate) Microsoft and Intel. They just can’t understand why anyone would not want to advertise at the top of their lungs Windows and Intel chips. If a company does not want to earn a little more money by putting your ugly stickers all over their nice hardware design, then STFU and leave the company alone.

    No bloatware is a welcome, long overdue nicety.

    • BloodSoul
    • 7 years ago

    Game changer? With no notable name in PC tech Vizio actually has something to lose by entering this new market, in other words they might actually be held accountable for their actions.

    The lack of bloatware/sticker/BS seems like a good indicator that this company actually has an idea of why the unthinking majority makes the silly argument that “Macs are better because they are better”. Macs are fine (but pricey) products, but their apparent superiority lies highly in the fact that most PC-makers generally suck at what they do. Consumers don’t want 50,000 stickers telling them why their computer is just as good as everyone else’s, they don’t want 30 different programs that they’ve never heard of or care about utilizing their resources, and most importantly they don’t want mediocrity. All these things are blatant advertisements by manufacturers that “Our profit margin is more important than your satisfaction”.

    If build quality on these Vizio models is good and they stick to simplicity (5 models instead of 5000), I think this may be quite a successful venture.

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]All these things are blatant advertisements by manufacturers that "Our profit margin is more important than your satisfaction".[/quote<] Which is true, of course, for every company. At least they are open about it.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 7 years ago

        Maybe, but plenty of companies think that customer satisfaction leads to profit. The big OEMs think that the cheapest product possible leads to profit.

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          And which one is the path to higher profits…?

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 7 years ago

            Would you rather own Apple stock or Dell and HP?

            • adisor19
            • 7 years ago

            OWNED !

            Adi

            • BloodSoul
            • 7 years ago

            Vizio at the moment actually.

            Apple has plateaued, their room for growth is limited.
            Dell and HP are about as stable as my ex girlfriend at a mini-bar
            Vizio has shown signs of intelligence and isn’t particularly big (has room for growth). If it weren’t private I’d love to buy a few shares.

        • BloodSoul
        • 7 years ago

        There is a difference between a parasitic and symbiotic relationship. You don’t have to harm your target market to make a profit from them, you just need to find a method of offering them exactly what they want (a reliable/fast computer) for a price they are willing to pay. There are a multitude of ways to lower prices, some of which quite give the consumer what they paid for (bloatware, poor build quality, stickers galore). A more symbiotic method of lower cost is to take advantage of economies of scale, which seems to have worked well for Apple. More interestingly, if you can convince a group your product is worth more money due to its quality, you can charge more without increasing your overhead (increasing profit margin based on mutual trust, not mutual distrust).

        Companies that shortchange their customers for a quick buck are just making short-sighted decisions, accepting immediate gains in exchange for a dismal future.

      • grantmeaname
      • 7 years ago

      The profit margins are not a negotiable targets; the business has to make a certain percent of profit to continue attracting capital to be able to make new products. Consumers have told companies that they would rather take $30 of bloatware on their computers than they would pay $30 extra. It doesn’t agree with your values, and it doesn’t agree with my values, but it’s not like you can have a bloatware-discounted laptop with no bloatware from a company that stays in business.

        • BloodSoul
        • 7 years ago

        Under the assumption that Vizio is successful, I believe your argument would be fairly countered. Don’t get me wrong, I am 100% aware that reasonable profit margins are necessary for a business to run, however I appreciate Vizio’s (planned) use of economies of scale to increase profit margin… rather than the consumer unfriendly tactics of their competition. I see it as a very “Costco” approach to the PC industry, taking advantage of large numbers to secure reasonable prices and quality products (again under the assumption that this is not just over-hyped garbage… which the lack of bloatware and stickers would suggest).

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 7 years ago

          Apples and oranges.

          These start at $900 for an i3 model and just go up from there. Apple starts at $1,000 with an i5. The difference between the two is negligible.

          The sticker plagued variety go down to $300, and that’s a good way to get your model onto a Walmart display. The average sale price of a laptop is about $500.

            • paulWTAMU
            • 7 years ago

            You know, I don’t mind the damn stickers. Really. if a sticker (that I can remove) saves me 50-100 bucks I’m all for it. Hell, even if it just saves me 20-50 bucks, fine.
            What I like is the decent screen resolution and apparently sensible hardware.

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 7 years ago

            Talk about apples and oranges, the only $1000 Mac is the Air which is 11″.

          • esterhasz
          • 7 years ago

          It’s going to be an interesting experiment, to say the least, because if successful, it could spark a trend.

          I for one switched to Mac a couple of years ago, for a variety of reasons, but one set being the fact that I have diapers to change, work 60+ hours a week, don’t go out any more because I’m too tired – and in what little time I have, I don’t want to peel off stickers, uninstall bloatware, stare at a screen that sucks, and carry a plastic brick around. I don’t even want to think about it, because there are thousand other things I have to take care of. For people like me, money is not the limiting factor, time and “cognitive capacity” is. Perhaps someday, I’ll have spare time again and will live my tech enthusiasm in other ways that vicariously through TR comments, but at the moment, I feel that the PC market simply no longer caters to people in my situation.

          And I think that my socioeconomic group is not that small. If Vizio can get a chunk out of that market, great. It will have to compete with Apple at least a bit though because price is simply not the decisive factor here. The capacity to “spare the hassle” is.

    • Deanjo
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]just a clean copy of Windows with Microsoft Signature certification.[/quote<] This is just dirty. It is one thing for MS to charge you a $100 to clean up a OEM machine of crapware but it is entirely different when that OEM is charging you to clean crapware off your system that they put on. Edit: misread their chart. I thought only the top of the line model comes with signature. Still you shouldn't have to have signature in the first place if it is a clean windows install

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]This is just dirty. It is one thing for MS to charge you a $100 to clean up a OEM machine of crapware but it is entirely different when that OEM is charging you to clean crapware off your system that they put on.[/quote<] That's just how things need to be to keep prices low. That crapware brings in advertising dollars that in turn let the company sell you the laptop cheaper. Crapware-free laptop [i<]should[/i<] cost more - it's the premium you pay for not having to erase it yourself. Expecting no-crapware laptop at the same price is like expecting [url<]http://www.google.com[/url<] to be free of ads.

        • grantmeaname
        • 7 years ago

        That’s exactly what I just said on the other thread! You get it…

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        I can buy a clone PC with virgin installs cheaper then a Brandname PC with loaded crap.

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          Point?

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            When Apple used to load their systems with crap (IE, sample ware, etc) they made $3.22 for each system sold. They smartened up and removed that crap ware and didn’t charge extra for it. The subsidies are not as big as you think and smart companies figured out just by removing the crap ware they sold a hell of a lot more systems.

      • grantmeaname
      • 7 years ago

      Signature includes driver optimizations and the like, according to the linked article.

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        Driver optimizations such as installing the latest available ones. There isn’t much for optimizing.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 7 years ago

    Their spec sheet (which is an image printed to PDF – c’mon guys!) seems to suggest they skip optical drives, too. I wonder if they’re packing in a flash drive or some sort of other restore media?

    [url<]http://cdn.vizio.com/resources/downloads/computing_techspec.pdf[/url<]

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      They are only for pre-order right now. I looked for the obvious USB to Ethernet adapter in their accessories, but there was none. So my guess is that they’re going to release these accessories with the actual release, or else they are assuming that their primary customers will get their own accessories.

      That actually does surprise me a bit, though. For pegging these machines as having nice display capabilities, you would think that they would offer a drive for playback.

        • ludi
        • 7 years ago

        802.11n standard in both notebook lines; realistically, who is every going to hardline a machine like this? That plus 2xUSB 3.0, an HDMI port, and an SD card reader is a pretty good spread of support.

        Hardly anybody uses optical drives to watch video on a laptop these days, nice display or no. All you need is some combination of Netflix, Hulu Plus, and Amazon Prime and you can stream 90% of everything with pretty decent quality.

          • superjawes
          • 7 years ago

          Well the All-In-One model doesn’t have an optical drive either.

          And yeah, most people don’t need a dedicated optical drive anymore, but these are the guys who made their $2,000,000,000 business by mostly selling in Walmart and Costco. The real thing that puzzles me is the USB 3.0 support without the peripheral devices to add functionality. An optical drive would be an easy sell, branded to match your new setup.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 7 years ago

          Would have liked to have seen more than 2 USB ports on the notebooks, particularly the larger non-Ultrabook. 2x USB 3.0 is nice and all but the chipset has so much more than that available to it. The AIOs have more at least.

      • grantmeaname
      • 7 years ago

      It could be a little 5gb partition of the hard drive. The last few computers I’ve fixed for friends have been like that.

        • Convert
        • 7 years ago

        Every PC I’ve worked on has this, also in all cases the recovery data has been a WIM file so you have control over it.

        • khands
        • 7 years ago

        what do you do when the hard drive dies/

          • ludi
          • 7 years ago

          Sometimes, you can contact the manufacturer for restore media, and pay a shipping and handling fee to obtain. It will be vendor-locked to that manufacturer’s hardware and you will still need the CoA on the chassis, so the fee is just cost-and-nuisance compensation for the vendor, you don’t have to re-buy the actual Windows license.

          However, many hard drive failures occur either within warranty (ship it back for repair) or so far outside of warranty that it may not be worthwhile.

    • cygnus1
    • 7 years ago

    nope, nope, nope. the ultrabook has no ethernet and only iGPU. the bigger one has a poorly paired gpu, the GT640 won’t game at 1080p well enough. not what i’m looking for. i’m still looking forward to that gigabyte U2442

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      Most ultrabooks, at least 14″ and under, lack ethernet and use the iGPU. The iGPU I understand due to space and thermal constraints, I never did get the lack of ethernet, it can be done even if it’s a tight fit while keeping the chssis slim.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 7 years ago

      I don’t think you’re looking for an ultrabook.

        • superjawes
        • 7 years ago

        I WANT A SMART PHONE THAT CAN PLAY CRYSIS!

          • grantmeaname
          • 7 years ago

          …but can it play crysis?

      • Malphas
      • 7 years ago

      Then why the hell are you commenting on an Ultrabook article? Ultrabooks aren’t for gaming, and putting a discrete GPU in one is worse than pointless.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 7 years ago

    That performance book is AMAZING looking. If I had the coin it would be mine already.

    • BobbinThreadbare
    • 7 years ago

    I’ve thought for years there was room for a semi-premium PC maker while all the old guard was racing towards the bottom. Nice to see someone stepping in.

      • esterhasz
      • 7 years ago

      Indeed. Especially the bloatware scourge and those unbelievable stickers have made even more expensive laptops look like prizes from the duck fishing ring at the county fair. I hope that Vizio will make a splash.

      • insulin_junkie72
      • 7 years ago

      Coming from the company that led the charge to the bottom in HDTV, amusingly enough.

    • superjawes
    • 7 years ago

    So my only question is….when will Damage Labs get hold of one?

    • paulWTAMU
    • 7 years ago

    Oh, I want these. I’m not sure which one yet, but DAMN these look like what I’ve been wanting. Bit pricey but hey, decent screen.

    • mattthemuppet
    • 7 years ago

    those look pretty sweet to me, especially the 3.4lb weight for the 14in version. The base configuration is actually an i3 for $900 – an extra $50 nets you exactly the same but with an i5 instead. The i7 is $1200 but gets a 256GB SSD too. If the screen and touchpad are anyway half decent, they should have a winner on their hands. I’d buy at 14in one if I was in the market right now.

    • flip-mode
    • 7 years ago

    Who should I email news to? I sent links to this story to CK days ago.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      This is article #1 in today’s shortbread, maybe it can just take a few days with all the emails they get?

      • dpaus
      • 7 years ago

      Maybe the guy whose e-mail link is at the very beginning of every shortbread??

        • flip-mode
        • 7 years ago

        Yeah, I never thought of emailing Ronald.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 7 years ago

    Hopefully they come out with some 12-14″ ‘regular’ (non-ultrabook) notebooks.

      • ludi
      • 7 years ago

      Me want also. If they could get something going to fill in where the Acer Timeline units units left off, but with higher display resolution, I might finally upgrade from my 1810TZ.

      • paulWTAMU
      • 7 years ago

      I love 13″ for real portability, but offerings in that form are scarce. Hell, at 13″ I could live with the 768 vertical resolution (I know, I’m awful). If they could offer a 13.3″ with a 1600×900 though, at about 750-800, and a decent CPU/GPU/RAM I’d be all over it.

      • grantmeaname
      • 7 years ago

      What do you mean about non-ultrabook? What features do you want that ultrabooks lack, or what features do you not want that ultrabooks have? Is it the thinness-over-performance philosophy?

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        If you go to their product info page, they have a ‘Thin+Light’ line (ultrabook) and a ‘Notebook’ line (normal-ish notebook), I was referring to the latter. Ultrabooks are cool looking and all but imo they still sacrifice too much to be stylish – for example, I can live with something that is up to 1″ think (omg!) if it has better battery life because of it. The only size listed under ‘Notebook’ is 15.6″, to me the ideal all-around notebook size is 13.3 or 14″.

          • WillBach
          • 7 years ago

          Vizio could make the design you’re looking for, but they won’t, because it would be too easy to manufacture, and the market for easy to manufacture Windows laptop is saturated. That’s the impression I got from reading the interviews that the Vizio heads did with The Verge. Anything they do that requires real engineering effort, can be copied by Dell, HP, Asus, Acer, MSI, Sony, and Lenovo in about six month. Six months gives Vizio time to upgrade and refine their products. If they make something too much like a de-crappified mass market laptop, at least one mass market manufacture will decrappify one of their laptops and undercut Vizio on price.

    • dpaus
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]Vizio PCs will be sold devoid of unnecessary stickers—something that apparently involved a bit of a battle with Intel and Microsoft. There won't be any software bloat, either[/quote<] C'mon, three cheers for these guys! Hip, hip - hooray! Hip, hip - Hooray! Hip, hip - HOORAY!!! I'd love to hear more about 'the battle with Intel and Microsoft'

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      That’s just about pricing. You get cheaper stuff for advertising “Intel Inside” or “Built for Windows” on your chasis. Was a big deal when I was putting some computers together for my university. Was certainly going to be a big deal for getting these computers in at the desired price point.

      But yes, quite a nice touch.

      • CuttinHobo
      • 7 years ago

      I agree, and I’d say this is one of the more interesting laptop releases because of how Vizio is going about it. The mix of solid hardware with a reasonable display, removing the junk, and focusing on selling vast quantities of a few models seems like a winner to me.

      I don’t understand why other OEMs insist on offering 53 very-slightly-different models that are all garbage, instead of just focusing their efforts. Focus! Let economies of scale work in your favor.

      • Wirko
      • 7 years ago

      I don’t mind stickers. I’ve removed three of them from my notebook but the one that says “Centrino” somehow isn’t ugly enough.

      However, someone should educate the users and tell them that peeling off the stickers doesn’t break the law, the warranty, or the computer itself – all they get is an undecorated PC, as seen on manufacturers’ web sites.

        • crabjokeman
        • 7 years ago

        I’ll take the discount and the stickers if they’re easily removable.

          • Wirko
          • 7 years ago

          If [url=http://www.realgeek.com/geeky-laptop-stickers-pure-madness/<]this[/url<] could help me get a Macbook for the price of a Plastickbook ...

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