Google’s $199 tablet is official; you can pre-order one now

Everyone was expecting Google to unveil a new tablet at its I/O developer conference this morning, and the company didn’t disappoint. It pulled back the curtain on the Nexus 7, a seven-inch device designed in collaboration with Asus. The Nexus 7 starts at $199, and you can pre-order one right now from the Google Play store (just so long as you live in the U.S., Canada, UK, or Australia). Shipments are scheduled to kick off in the middle of next month.

The Nexus 7 pretty much matches the rumor mill’s descriptions to a tee. It has an IPS display with a 1280×800 resolution, and it’s powered by a quad-core Tegra 3 processor with 1GB of RAM. The device comes with Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, NFC, and Micro USB connectivity, and it features a front-facing 1.2-megapixel webcam. Google claims the battery is good for up to eight hours of active use or nine hours of video playback. 8GB and 16GB versions of the device are available, both weighing in at 0.75 lbs (340 g) with a thickness of 0.41″. The higher-capacity model will set you back $249.

Google will be shipping the Nexus 7 with the next version of its mobile operating system: Android 4.1 Jelly Bean. This morning’s Google I/O keynote included a Jelly Bean demo with a showcase of the new features. Apparently, the new mobile OS will feature substantial improvements to touch responsiveness and animation fluidity, thanks in part to the implementation of vsync and triple buffering. Jelly Bean will also have a new search interface (with interactive voice controls and text-to-speech answers), souped-up notifications (which show more information and can be customized), improved autocorrect, offline speech recognition, and a new feature called Google Now, which will let your phone do things like keep track of flights and tell you when to leave for meetings in order to get there on time.

Google expects to deliver Jelly Bean as an over-the-air update next month. Other Android devices will presumably get the upgrade, too, although knowing Android hardware makers, some folks might have to wait a while.

Oh, and one last thing to sweeten the pot: Google says the Nexus 7 will come with a $25 Google Play store credit, as well as a free movie (Transformers: Dark of the Moon), a free book (The Bourne Dominion), and some free music. I think I heard exactly one person hoot in excitement when Google announced the title of the free film. The store credit sounds like a nice way to draw users away from the Kindle Fire, though.

Comments closed
    • dashbarron
    • 7 years ago

    A nifty slap in the face for ASUS’ Infinity upcoming a week later. I wonder if they’ll adjust the price of it to account for this lower cost solution with the same processor? Smaller screen and fewer pixels, storage and expansion are lacking, but $300 is a fairly large gap.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 7 years ago

      Asus is building the Nexus 7, so they’re slapping themselves in the face?

        • CasbahBoy
        • 7 years ago

        Yeah, and it sounds like the arrangement has Google taking the loss (or breaking even on their investment) while Asus profits from production.

      • mcnabney
      • 7 years ago

      Infinity actually has a faster Tegra3 – theirs runs at 1.6ghz, not 1.3.

        • dashbarron
        • 7 years ago

        Same processor, faster speed.

    • CityEater
    • 7 years ago

    Lame just ordered one in Australia and the premium in aus dollars is way over what it should be. The 8gb is $249 Aus. Not exactly in line with the value of the dollar. Not that $250 is much and its still a good deal but I don’t like being milked that little extra bit just because I’m overseas.

    • mcnabney
    • 7 years ago

    [b<]My questions about the Nexus 7 and external storage through the microUSB port have been answered by their support team. Their response is as follows:[/b<] [i<]Thank you for contacting Google. It was my pleasure assisting you today. Though the Nexus 7 doesn’t include an SD card slot, we offer a 16 GB version if you’re looking for additional storage. [u<]Yes you can use an external storage through the microUSB.[/u<] If there is anything further we can assist you with, please feel free to reply directly to this email or visit our help center at [url<]http://support.google.com/googleplay/bin/request.py?contact_type=contact_policy&policy=hardware[/url<] Regards, Jon The Google Play Team[/i<]

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      It’s nice to have an answer but tbh that just makes the whole lack of SD expansion seem even more arbitrary and silly. If you don’t even have to root to expand storage all it does is make things awkward – an internal SD slot is just much cleaner and there’s no chance of damaging the port.

      I can only guess it was done to hit a price point but if so the margins but be near zero as-is, I can’t think that adding an SD slot adds *that* much to production costs.

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        It’s still a feature that’s inconvenient and not too well published. Common folks wouldn’t even think of it; they would just go for the 16GB one.

        In other words, Google has next to nothing to gain by adding a microSD slot, but everything to lose

          • paulWTAMU
          • 7 years ago

          Can you even find an SD card adaptor that uses microUSB? If so this is clunky but possibly OK for me.

            • mcnabney
            • 7 years ago

            You just need this: [url<]http://www.amazon.com/SANOXY-Micro-USB-OTG-Adapter/dp/B005QX7KYU[/url<] And yes, it is currently a whole $1.37 SHIPPED, but will arrive in about a month - seriously. You can spend $5-10 and get one in a few days. Then just stick the SD card in a SD to USB adapter and go. I picked up a 32GB thumbdrive for $18 too. Get an extra-small one, since it will be dangling. I actually think that allowing USB HOST (as the email indicates) without ROOT is a good move for Google. The techies that WANT constantly expandable storage can still get it, but the masses will go ahead and jump up to the 16GB. I think they didn't want any difference between the 8/16GB models, but including the microSD slot would discourage the choice of 16GB. What they should have done was put the microSD slot on the 16GB version only. At least they appear to allow external storage through microUSB. Not perfect, but it works fine.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      Whoa, that’s different than the answer Anandtech got:

      [url<]http://www.anandtech.com/show/6061/mhl-and-usbotg-on-the-nexus-7-mounting-usb-storage-not-supported[/url<]

    • WaltC
    • 7 years ago

    Disappointing that nowhere in the specifications, other than “7” tablet”–unless I just missed it–do we see the actual *size* of this device as a function of WxH. I’d be interested to know what the pixel density is, as for a ~7″ screen 1280×800 seems very robust in that regard.

      • TAViX
      • 7 years ago

      From XbitLabs:

      “Manufactured by Asustek Computer, the Nexus 7 tablet comes with 7” display with 1280*800 resolution and is based on Nvidia Tegra 3 system-on-chip with four ARM Cortex-A9 cores (+1 low-power A9 core) as well as Google Android 4.1 “Jelly Bean” operating system. The device comes equipped with 1GB LPDDR2 memory, 8GB or 16GB internal NAND flash-based storage, 1.2MP front-facing camera, Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, Bluetooth, NFC (with Android Beam support), microphone, speaker, accelerometer, magnetometer, gyroscope, GPS, 4325mAh battery and so on.”

      Cheers!

      • HighTech4US2
      • 7 years ago

      198.5 x 120 x 10.45mm

      [url<]http://www.modaco.com/page/news/_/android/world-exclusive-full-nexus-7-details-r615[/url<]

    • gmskking
    • 7 years ago

    I think I will stick with my Nexus phone that has 32GB. My phone should not double a tablet in storage.

      • Farting Bob
      • 7 years ago

      A tablet for $200/250 with no contract against a phone that will generally cost thousands over the life of the required 2 year contract, or if you buy a phone that doesnt need a contract, you pay far far more up front than this tablet.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        He wasn’t even talking about the cost, he was just talking about storage.

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 7 years ago

    Hopefully, this’ll reset the expectations for all standard tablets at the $200 range and drive lower prices for all tablets. Well, except those made by Apple, of course.

    I like the fact that GPS is standard. That’s great. It makes sense, though, if Google wants to use your travel data to “assist you” by learning all your travel habits.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 7 years ago

    The absence of any media port connectivity is extremely annoying. Not that you can’t get around it but COMMON! I would have gotten this just to view pictures I’ve taken with my DSLR when out on a hike or something to that effect. but the fact is I can’t get my bloody pictures on this device without another intermediary device. It is literally a google play device. Nothing wrong with that. There is ALLOT of value for a urban dweller what with all the free wifi all around. But I could have done with the 16 gb model adding some baseline features. The absence of dueling cameras also SEVERLY limits the function of this device. I feel this is not for the nerds of the world but more for the casual consumers. That is fine but I’d still like to see a Nexus 10 W/ dual cameras and media card ports.

      • End User
      • 7 years ago

      Which tablet do you have now?

    • Shouefref
    • 7 years ago

    The 7-inch (17.8cm) Nexus tablet features a quad-core CPU (central processing unit) and a 12-core GPU (graphics processing unit).

    Woow!

    • trackerben
    • 7 years ago

    On first glance, it would make for an affordable Satnav with the right car mount. Big screen but not too big, GPS to drive industry-leading Google Maps, uncapped Android updating. But… no 3G/4G, therefore no OTA updates on the road. Which means spending an additional $49-99 more for a navigation app with loaded maps. As well as no Skype or voip-messaging away from hotspots. This is no full commo screen.

    And no USB for adding widgetry and charging stuff, no microSD for convenient media sharing and consumption. Perhaps the microUSB port can be dongled as USB Host. This is no shared media screen.

    Here we have the lightweight equivalent of the original iPad with a fraction of available memory but with an overpowered SoC, GPS, camera, and a coupon to get us to Google Play. It seems to be best fit as a games/ apps/ reader machine.

    What a missed opportunity.

    Edit: And neither is it broadly configurable as a cheap industrial device. The NFC might have helped jump-start smartcard or smartphone purchases at the street vendor level, but without telecomms it’s not secured for OTA transactional solutions like mobile retail settlement or non-warehouse inventory.

    Edit2: Google has said it can “use an external storage through the microUSB” which makes it passable as a shared media small screen. With high-end apps like Garmin or the coming TomTom, the Nexus 7 16GB may make a decent auto media center and nice satnav navigator for $300, particularly if paired with a hotspotted phone for convenient routing updates and uploads.

      • dpaus
      • 7 years ago

      Didn’t Google just make Google Maps cacheable?

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        yes.

        • trackerben
        • 7 years ago

        [url<]http://www.androidpolice.com/2012/06/27/google-maps-now-features-offline-support-streetview-sees-improved-compass-mode/[/url<] So I've heard, but navigation is limited to OTA mode. But without onboard turn-by-turn and larger preloaded areas, it remains a plotting and piloting but not a driving solution.

      • bwcbiz
      • 7 years ago

      At $199 they have plenty of room to add other models with more features while still being competitive on price. Can’t call this a missed opportunity until the full product line is known.

      “Perhaps the microUSB port can be dongled….” Well, duh.

        • trackerben
        • 7 years ago

        Well now, it can’t be called a missed opportunity if there is a full product line, if we did know about such a line, and if there was such a model in such a product line better suited to my purposes. Not knowing such and only seeing what we can see, “a miss” isn’t an unreasonable opinion, for now.

        It was mentioned that the microUSB port might not be officially enabled for USB Host/On the Go functions.

    • d0g_p00p
    • 7 years ago

    I had no desire or interest in tablets. I have a HP Touchpad that I bought for dirt cheap when all the retailers were trying to dump stock. It still sits in my hardware closet unused. However for $200 I really cannot pass this it up. Google is thinking smart about this with the super cheap price. 2GB of RAM would be nice but again at $200 I really cannot complain.

      • TakinYourPoints
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]I have a HP Touchpad... It still sits in my hardware closet unused.[/quote<] That explains everything

        • Shouefref
        • 7 years ago

        It just as he said: “I had no desire or interest in tablets.”
        If he would, he would have used it.
        My interest is very low too.
        I have to admit that my interest is nothing but curiosity, but has nothing to do with a real interest.

    • Laykun
    • 7 years ago

    I think a lot of people are incorrectly assuming that the $50 price jump from 8GB version to the 16GB version is based solely on the expansion of internal NAND. It’s much more likely that the 8GB version is heavily subsidised or even made at a loss simply to make for stiff competition. The 16GB version is probably more realistically priced based on it’s internals.

    Google just wants to give you a platform to view ads on, as that’s where it makes it’s money, and is the reason android was made, I’m sure they’d gladly sell the 8GB at a loss if it won you over to their side.

    • Star Brood
    • 7 years ago

    Manufacturer prices are quite often inflated like this because they hold a monopoly on who gets to build your device. I hope we never get to the point where all mainstream computers are laptops with soldered components and tablets. I am still not sold on tablets though I’ve worked on all three iPads and a few galaxy tabs. It may just be that arm processors annoy the heck out of me, or that touchscreen is not as responsive as I need it to be. Or that I simply need a tactile keyboard.

    • pedro
    • 7 years ago

    IMHO, the Nexus Q is absolutely drool worthy. Definitely getting one of those things.

    Edit:

    “We’re sorry. The Google Play music player is currently only available in the United States.”

    Sort of makes it a non-starter for those of us in Australia…

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      for 300$? seems pretty pricey to me.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        Yeah wtf…is the design so sexy it’s worth $200 more than other media streamers?

        It’s a very restrictive device for Google too. Streaming *only* with no local media playback, Google Play only, and on top of that it requires a separate Android device to use. Even if it is highly hackable it makes no sense at $300.

        It’s almost like Google and MS both got infected by some Apple walled-garden zombie virus.

          • pedro
          • 7 years ago

          I know all this, and even still, I’m all over it. I dunno why.

      • esterhasz
      • 7 years ago

      You can VPN into the US once, get an account, and use it just normally afterwards…

    • Xenolith
    • 7 years ago

    Too much bezel. A near zero bezel 7″ tablet would fit nicely in your jeans pocket. I can actually cram my 7″ galaxy tab into my front jeans pocket.

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    I love how everyone is now fleecing customers for NAND. There’s no way 8GB of NAND costs $50.

    This is Apple-level pricing stupidity in a market where it doesn’t belong.

      • mcnabney
      • 7 years ago

      Retail prices of NAND (which includes the USB fob or SD packaging) are about $0.50/GB. So guess that the manufacturing cost would be a dime per GB, tops. So yes, $50 more for 80 cents of product. If Google had a clue they would include a microSD slot on the 16GB model as well. That would push the adoption rate of the $250 model. For me, I order the 8GB version, a microUSB to female USB dongle ($1.49), and a supersmall 32GB USB fob for $18.50. So $20 for 4x the storage increase.

        • madmilk
        • 7 years ago

        Profit margins on things like NAND flash are actually pretty low, since they’re truly commodity items.

        Also, the kind of NAND in a USB or SD package is usually B-grade, meaning it won’t last very many cycles (think ~1000). SSDs have higher quality NAND that lasts substantially longer, and I would hope tablets and phones with non-replaceable memory are similar.

        Nevertheless, it is indeed ridiculous that 8GB of NAND costs $50. After all that’s what a 60GB SSD costs these days.

      • TakinYourPoints
      • 7 years ago

      Consumer products aren’t based on bill-of-materials, they are based on demand and what a customer is willing to pay to get certain features or functionality. The RAM may not cost $50 to the manufacturer but the additional storage is more than likely worth it to the person making the purchase.

        • Chrispy_
        • 7 years ago

        Exactly. They’re fleecing you because they intentionally cripple the device by omitting any kind of SD card compatibility, and then making your only alternative ridiculously expensive for what it is.

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          It’s the Apple way.

          It just works.

          • designerfx
          • 7 years ago

          I’d start looking at apple before you complain about this from a $200 device.

            • trackerben
            • 7 years ago

            If it’s a question of cost and not internal space, card readers and USB hubs retailing for $5 or less come from the same component factories. What the Chinese routinely do, Google can aspire to.

    • slaimus
    • 7 years ago

    I hate the storage-based pricing on tablet.

    8GB of soldered flash should not cost $50 more. 60GB SSDs are sold for $50 now.

    • Madman
    • 7 years ago

    No external storage… That’s enough reason to avoid buying a tablet right now.

    Especially since everyone I know have them collecting dust anyway…

    • indeego
    • 7 years ago

    This seems like more nail in the coffin to Nook than Fire or anything above it on the iPad line.

      • cynan
      • 7 years ago

      Maybe the Nook Color. I still don’t get how people see tablets – devices with backlit screens – as true replacements for E-ink devices.

        • indeego
        • 7 years ago

        Because you can read the typical amount of time you normally would read without interruption on them. Plus more. My daughter just charges her before school every day, reads for 1-3 hours a night.

        I’d never consider an e-ink device, they seem far too limiting.

          • cynan
          • 7 years ago

          Maybe it’s just me, but I find reading for any length of time from a backlit device to be more fatiguing than a non backlit one. Plus, now that e-ink readers are around $100, their obvious limitations as a computing device are easier to look past – if you spend a fair bit of time reading anyway, particularly with the better battery life.

          That said, I admit that $200 fully functional tablets with IPS screens and decent pixel density must be pretty tempting to gadget-o-philes who have a limited budgets and are looking into getting an e-reader.

            • indeego
            • 7 years ago

            Reverse the coloring to be white on black. Makes a huge difference, IMO.

            • ET3D
            • 7 years ago

            As you say, it’s individual. I’ve read quite a bit on backlit displays, and have no problem with that. I think I’d enjoy a Pixel-Qi style display that can give the best of both worlds, but for now I’d take colour, resolution, refresh speed and extra functionality. I already have an e-ink based e-book reader, but I think this will be better.

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 7 years ago

          I wonder if younger eyes can deal with it better.

          I love my Nook Simple Touch and would hate doing my reading with a backlit device.

            • ET3D
            • 7 years ago

            I think it’s more an individual matter than an age one. Perhaps being used to it also matters. I’ve been sitting in front of computer screens for most of the day for over 25 years and I still don’t have a problem with that, even though my eyesight isn’t what it used to be. (Of course when I read something like this discussion I become more aware of the light and it disturbs me a little, but in the normal course of the day I pay no attention to it.)

          • derFunkenstein
          • 7 years ago

          But you do have to remember to plug it in. With a standard Kindle Touch you can read for weeks between charges.

            • indeego
            • 7 years ago

            This is second nature to me. Fewer devices/things that have more power is far more ideal to myself than specific devices that do special things.

      • HighTech4US2
      • 7 years ago

      And There It Is, The Final Nail In Kindle Fire’s Coffin

      [url<]http://seekingalpha.com/article/688501-and-there-it-is-the-final-nail-in-kindle-fire-s-coffin?source=yahoo[/url<]

        • dwc13
        • 7 years ago

        I find the objectivity of the author suspect when he has SHORT Amazon stock.

          • HighTech4US2
          • 7 years ago

          The hardware deficiencies of the Kindle Fire vs the Nexus 7 remain just the same.

            • dwc13
            • 7 years ago

            As does the suspect credibility of the article’s author. He has a clear bias in writing this type of article glorifying Google’s Nexus 7 because he already has an ulterior motive (author is SHORT Amzaon stock).

            I’d say its expected for a NEW tech product offering to have superior specs to a tech product that was annonced back in September 2011 and has been on the market since November 2011. This is an apples to oranges comparison by the author. Lame.

            • HighTech4US2
            • 7 years ago

            How does that change the hardware deficiencies?

            • dwc13
            • 7 years ago

            The author is comparing the lastest upcoming item from Google against a device that has already been on the market for @8 months, which is an eternity in the world of computers/electronics. Of course the Nexus 7 should have superior hardware specs; if it didn’t (and cost the same to the end user), it would probably be DOA when it hits the market. What I’m pointing out is the author has an ulterior motive to trash Amazon’s dated product offering — he is SHORT Amazon. So if his article somehow adversely affects Amazon’s stock price, his portfolio will be rewarded.

            BTW, Nexus 7 isn’t going to “kill” the Fire as the author claims. On the contrary, the Fire 2 will likely end up killing the Fire.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            well the reality is that they coexist until Amazon upgrades the Fire’s hardware.

            • indeego
            • 7 years ago

            Or Amazon will “short” sale the rest of the original fires and move on. Every company in tech has contingency plans for newer tech replacing old. Well, after iPhone/iPad, I would hope they do.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 7 years ago

    Cool device I liked the gifting plug at the end. That’s what I’d do with it give it to a family member to try out like my parents or something.

      • mcnabney
      • 7 years ago

      I gave my mother-in-law a Xoom a bit over a year ago. She doesn’t own a computer and doesn’t know how to use one. However she loves the tablet and uses it every day. Simple. Works everywhere.

    • gmskking
    • 7 years ago

    16GB just isn’t enough these days. Bad, bad move Google.

      • bthylafh
      • 7 years ago

      I submit that you’re not the target for this particular device and price point.

        • gmskking
        • 7 years ago

        You are correct. They are targeting suckers and I am not one of them.

          • HighTech4US2
          • 7 years ago

          And the Kindle Fire didn’t?

            • mcnabney
            • 7 years ago

            Kindle Fire ran a custom Android OS. This is supposed to run naked Jellybean, so you can do anything with it. Well, anything but hold much content. I wonder how much of the capacity is taken by the single movie they added? Probably at least a couple gigs. How does Google expect to SELL stuff on PLAY when people don’t have enough room to store it? This thing REQUIRES WIFI to access Google’s servers, so the Cloud isn’t the best storage solution.

            • HighTech4US2
            • 7 years ago

            My reply to king was if he thought that the Google Nexus 7 was targeting suckers (which it isn’t) that the Kindle Fire was most certainly was.

          • Shouefref
          • 7 years ago

          Every tablet targets suckers.

          • ET3D
          • 7 years ago

          So you’re the type to pay $600 for 64GB?

          • Welch
          • 7 years ago

          Ummmm how exactly are they targeting suckers? $200 bucks get you a tablet with tegra3 16gb of storage, wifi and bluetooth a nice screen… all in a reasonable size tablet with 4.1 (vsync and triple buffer.. about time) all the while throwing in $25 bucks of credit on the market, a movie for those who care and other random stuff that has value to some. Even by its own at 200 bucks thats a huge leap over slower offerings in similar size that cost more! Plus its straight from google so your likely to be the first to receive updates to a android before anyone else. The only thing that would push this device over the limit for me to being “BADASS” would be if it had a rear HD camera, a MicroSD card slot and hell, break the 1GB memory barrier and go for 2GB :P.

          I mean if that makes someone a sucker then quick.. someone drop a kidney for the iPad 3 before the price climbs any higher……

          Your definition of a sucker demands some serious refinement my friend.

      • ET3D
      • 7 years ago

      A microsd slot would have been nice, I agree, but I think 16GB is still nice for an entry level tablet.

      • kamikaziechameleon
      • 7 years ago

      Do you know how google play works???

        • mcnabney
        • 7 years ago

        I do, and the Cloud can only be accessed through wifi on this device – which pretty much cripples the usefullness of this tablet since everywhere I go that has wifi there is also a better computing device to use.

    • ludi
    • 7 years ago

    This might finally convince my dad to part with $200. He’s been wanting a tablet for e-reader use and light browsing for a while now, and the TouchPad was too big while the Kindle Fire didn’t quite wake him up.

    • gmskking
    • 7 years ago
    • mcnabney
    • 7 years ago

    Anybody know if Android will have USB HOST functionality so that external SD/thumbdrives can be accessed through that microUSB port?

      • cynan
      • 7 years ago

      So far ICS doesn’t. But if you root your Android device you can get 3rd party apps that provide USB Host functionality (Stickmount).

        • Voldenuit
        • 7 years ago

        Gah, so close. It’s sad that my 2 year old nokia n8 phone has functionality that modern phone and tablet makers are neglecting on their systems – MTP (WP7, iOS), USB Host (Android), etc.

        Note, I’m not trying to promote the (as-good-as-dead) SymbianOS, instead, I’m calling out the market leaders on gimping device functionality and user freedom.

          • cynan
          • 7 years ago

          Yup. How else do they get to overcharge for storage memory upgrades? I had a Cowon mp3 player from 2005 that had USB Host functionality…

            • mcnabney
            • 7 years ago

            Uhm, you can’t upgrade the memory. When you hit 16GB you have to buy another whole device and drag it along with you.

        • videobits
        • 7 years ago

        Umm….My Acer A500 tablet has a full size USB port that accepts USB sticks and seems to work just fine with Android v3 and 4.

        Now it is a whole different port, not shared with the micro-USB port. So, hardware might be a problem but the Android software seems to support it.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 7 years ago

          Lots of tablets also have OTG support so that with an adapter it’ll support USB devices without a full-sized USB port. Even the cheap Chinese OEMs like Ainol have it on the NOVO7 and ELF, and it’s not uncommon on devices that people might actually want.

          Whether or not this device has it is another question, and it’s be nice if it did.

          • cynan
          • 7 years ago

          Yes. you are correct. I was thinking of the version of ICS that comes on phones such as the Galaxy Nexus. For some reason USB Host functionality is crippled, even though it works well enough once the device has been rooted so that this functionality can be enabled.

          Given that this tablet is fairly low cost and bears the Nexus name, I’d not be surprised to see this feature locked out to begin with, but it’d be a nice surprise if Google decided to magnanimously allow this to be enabled for all Jelly Bean-capapable devices.

      • DancinJack
      • 7 years ago

      You can if you root.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        From what I can tell digging around on Google, the Galaxy Nexus supports it without root. Hopefully the Nexus 7 will too.

    • superjawes
    • 7 years ago

    Google leak on Monday, then a Kindle Fire leak on Tuesday.

    Google makes tablet official on Wednesday….will we have a Kindle Fire announcement tomorrow?

    • bjm
    • 7 years ago

    Man, was so close… I was ready to pre-order it, but no 3G/4G. Boo! 🙁

    • lilbuddhaman
    • 7 years ago

    How easily it Rooted?

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      Sad part is that a person will more then likely have to root it and that shouldn’t be the case on a Google product especially when they promote the “openness” of Android. Being a google device one should not have to root it at all. (Of course you are stuck with closed blobs as well for alot of the devices hardware as well).

      Come on Google, release a truly free tablet, not one that wears a “free” logo on an otherwise locked safe.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        WTF. Joe Blow not only doesn’t know what to do with root access, but should NOT have it by default. The unlockable root on most devices is the way to go – people who have a vague idea of what they’re doing can do it, everyone else is left with a device that’s at least more difficult to exploit (not bulletproof, but MORE secure is better than NO security).

        The “openness” they promote is that anybody can make an Android-based device and the source is available to anyone (Honeycomb notwithstanding).

          • paulWTAMU
          • 7 years ago

          Also, harder to accidentley FUBAR. Joe Average is dangerous with totally unfettered access.

            • BabelHuber
            • 7 years ago

            I agree.

            I can imagine the conversation with my mother or my girfriend:

            – Her: My phone doesn’t work correctly anymore. Can you help?
            – Me: have you seen a popup ‘Application x wants root access.’ and have you clicked on ‘yes’?
            – Her: ???

            The mere thought is scaring…

          • Deanjo
          • 7 years ago

          So they should lock down PC’s too then by that logic since Joe Blow doesn’t drop down to cli, etc.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            And in the corporate world, they do.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            Actually, it is their IT staff that locks it down. The systems are shipped to the purchaser free and unlocked down.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            but the point is that by the time an end-user gets it, it’s been locked down. And that’s a good thing.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            No the system is unlocked when it is purchased. It is is up to the owner to decide if they want to allow others to have access. Completely different situation. Your example is more akin to a cellphones screen lock with password.

            • kc77
            • 7 years ago

            That’s actually not correct. Windows 7 and Vista and even to some extent XP have elevated users above that “Administrator” which would be root access. Hence the term rooting.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            And enabling those are as simple as a click.

            • kc77
            • 7 years ago

            You know there’s 1-click rooting for quite a few Android phones right?

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            Also, it goes without saying how many people completely f*** up their PCs because they have unfettered access.

            • bwcbiz
            • 7 years ago

            “So they should lock down PC’s too then by that logic since Joe Blow doesn’t drop down to cli, etc.”

            Hence Windows 8.

            No one here is saying every device should be locked down. But I will say that most devices for consumer use should be locked down. Just like we lock down people who drive one the wrong side of the road. The lockdown doesn’t have to be 100% secure from system owners, but it does have to satisfy 2 criteria:
            1) Secure enough to keep the curious but ignorant out. (Though with internet search this can be hard to achieve-“ignorance” is relative)
            2) Secure enough to keep out any attempt to root it via the net.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]2) Secure enough to keep out any attempt to root it via the net.[/quote<] That still can be done while giving root access.

            • paulWTAMU
            • 7 years ago

            We do at work. it’s nothing super secure but enough to prevent accidently killing your machine. If I could do it to my brother’s PC and my parent’s PC I would do that too.

      • PenGun
      • 7 years ago
    • End User
    • 7 years ago

    Pre-ordered a 16GB.

      • mcnabney
      • 7 years ago

      So you are cool paying $50 for 8GB of NAND?

        • Farting Bob
        • 7 years ago

        Well if you want/need more than 8GB of storage you got to pay. Its not like you can just rip it open and jam in another harddrive. $50 for 8GB extra is quite a bit, but compared to the competition its standard price increase. They probably sell the 8GB model at a loss, or very close to it, so those who buy the 16GB version are probably the ones who are making google any profit.

        • End User
        • 7 years ago

        No. I’m cool paying $312.66 CDN just to play around with Android 4.1. I don’t even plan on using it as my primary tablet (that is what my iPad is for).

    • fredsnotdead
    • 7 years ago

    Ordered the 16GB model. Maybe I’ll bring it to the BBQ, if I go.

    • Anarchist
    • 7 years ago

    only app you really need for tablet is a good web-browser. At $199 this one looks like the tablet to own if you actually need one.

      • Farting Bob
      • 7 years ago

      Im fairly sure there are other apps out there you might want to get as well…

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 7 years ago

    I’m sure this is tempting to a lot of people, but keep in mind that it won’t even be shipping for a few more weeks, at which point, the successor to the Kindle Fire should have been announced. Other companies will undoubtedly have been waiting to jump on the Android 4.1 bandwagon, as well.

    Google isn’t doing this because they want it to be unique. Worst case scenario, you’ll probably be able to get the same thing, at the same price, but with more memory.

      • HighTech4US2
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]Worst case scenario, you'll probably be able to get the same thing, at the same price, but with more memory.[/quote<] I highly doubt that. Have you really looked at the Specs? [url<]http://www.modaco.com/page/news/_/android/world-exclusive-full-nexus-7-details-r615[/url<] Both the Kindle Fire 2 or the Apple Mini will have a very hard time in matching the Nexus 7.

        • Rand
        • 7 years ago

        It wouldn’t surprise me if Amazon can match the Nexus, we already know through nVidia’s Kai platform that $200 Tegra 3 tablets should be very viable for $200, the Nexus only matches the stated status quo there.

        Acer’s upcoming 7″ Tegra 3 tablet is supposedly $250 and that’s supposed to have similar storage + SDCard, a bit more money a small added extra.

        Besides Amazon can use their own app store to subsidize the cost of the tablet, wouldn’t surprise me at all if Amazon can match or beat it on price and other vendors can match it or charge slightly more.

          • HighTech4US2
          • 7 years ago

          The original Kindle Fire is lacking in these areas:

          CPU: dual core 1ghz vs quad core 1.3ghz
          Display: 1024×600 (2 point multi-touch) vs 1280×800 (10 point multi-touch)
          Weight: 14.6 oz vs 11.99 oz

          And here is what the Kindle Fire is missing vs the Nexus 7:

          Front facing Camera and Microphone
          Sensors: Accelerometer, Magnetometer and a Gyroscope
          GPS
          Bluetooth
          NFC

          Software: forked Android 2.3 vs latest Android 4.1
          Google Apps: Unavailable vs Available

          [url<]http://seekingalpha.com/article/688501-and-there-it-is-the-final-nail-in-kindle-fire-s-coffin?source=yahoo[/url<] I do not see how the Kindle Fire 2 could add all of missing features and still remain at $199.

      • ET3D
      • 7 years ago

      That’s okay with me. If others bring similarly good products to the table, all the better. The matter is the concept, the idea that $200 can get me some decent specs and not a half baked Chinese tablet.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 7 years ago

    Assuming the displays are exactly the same size (big assumption, I know) it’s only about 1/4″ taller than a Kindle Fire (to make room for the front-facing camera, I’m sure) and has a ton better hardware. I’m pretty impressed and find myself vaguely lusting.

    The software looks great, too. Google Now appears to be a very serious Siri competitor.

      • HighTech4US2
      • 7 years ago

      It is exactly the same 7″ size.

      The math proves it:

      Google Nexus 7 screen size is (1280 x 800) pixels (16:10 format) with 216 ppi.

      The math:

      z = sq root (x*x + y*y)
      x = 1280/216 = 5.926
      y = 800/216 = 3.704

      z = sq root(35.11748 + 13.71962)
      z = 6.99″

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        I don’t think they’re quite the same shape unless the Kindle Fire’s pixels are a non-square shape. 1024×600 is not 16:10.

        Which actually kind of nullifies my first comment.

          • HighTech4US2
          • 7 years ago

          Well both displays are 7″ (measured diagonally). But you are right that the Kindle Fire has a weird aspect ratio.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            Right, so that means that since the Kindle has a wider aspect ratio, it’s probably just as tall as the Nexus 7 but a little narrower. But it’s fatter, heavier, and slower than the Nexus 7 and it’s not as open. The Nexus looks like a clear winner. I’m in love.

      • Farting Bob
      • 7 years ago

      Google is a serious Siri competitor now? So google hasnt been a competitor in the search market before? And from a bit of experience siri and other voice control stuff is one of those “cool to show off, you’ll probably use it for the first few weeks but after that its just a bit of a gimmick with little value to most people”.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 7 years ago

        Vlingo has been pretty good as well now for a while.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        No, dumbass. The “Google Now” software feature as described in Ars Technica’s liveblog appears to be a serious Siri competitor.

    • HighTech4US2
    • 7 years ago

    Finally a decent 7″ tablet at the right price.

    It also has GPS.

    Full Specs:

    7” 1280×800 HD display (216 ppi)
    Back-lit IPS display
    Scratch-resistant Corning glass
    1.2MP front-facing camera
    198.5 x 120 x 10.45mm
    340g
    WiFi 802.11 b/g/n
    Bluetooth
    8/16 GB internal storage
    1 GB RAM
    Micro USB
    4325 mAh (Up to 8 hours of active use)
    Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean)
    Quad-core Tegra 3 processor
    Microphone
    NFC (Android Beam)
    Accelerometer
    GPS
    Magnetometer
    Gyroscope

    [url<]http://www.modaco.com/page/news/_/android/world-exclusive-full-nexus-7-details-r615[/url<] [url<]https://play.google.com/store/devices/details?id=nexus_7_8gb&feature=device-featured#?t=W251bGwsMSwyLDIwMiwibnVsbC1mZWF0dXJlZF9kZXZpY2VzX1VTX18yX3Byb21vXzEzNDA1MTg5NjUwMzYiXQ..[/url<]

      • HighTech4US2
      • 7 years ago

      <DELETE>.

    • TDIdriver
    • 7 years ago

    I’m really wanting one of these. Too bad payday is next week 🙁

      • HighTech4US2
      • 7 years ago

      Do the pre-order now with a Charge Card. The CC won’t be charged until shipment which is 2-3 weeks away.

        • OneArmedScissor
        • 7 years ago

        Yeah, wooooo, spend money we don’t have!

          • HighTech4US2
          • 7 years ago

          You did see the words Charge Card not Credit Card right?

          TDI said he wouldn’t have the money until next week so why not per-order it on a Charge Card now. When he is paid next week put the money aside. When the CC statement comes in 4 to 6 weeks pay the CC off in full. Free use of someones else’s money with no interest. Why is that wrong?

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            Please, for the sake of the crowd – tell the difference between a “credit” card and a “charge” card.

            • HighTech4US2
            • 7 years ago

            A Credit Card is a Charge Card that you do not pay the balance in full each month. Thus incurring interest charges. You are paying someone else to use their money.

            A Charge Card is a Credit Card that you pay the balance in full each month. Thus you pay no interest, use someone else’s money for 30-45 days and (if you select correctly) get rebates in cash for using it.

            I have been using Charge Cards for about 15 years now and have accumulated over $10,000 in cash rebates along with other items like an Xbox360 w/Kinect. And have not paid a penny for the privilege.

            • TDIdriver
            • 7 years ago

            So they’re the same thing. The cardholder is the difference?

            • HighTech4US2
            • 7 years ago

            Exactly. Discipline is required but it is also rewarded.

            • superjawes
            • 7 years ago

            No…basically Charge means you have to pay full balance every month. Credit you will incur interest, but do not have to pay every month…if I understand that correctly.

            Basically, it sounds like the difference between Visa and Amex.

            • TDIdriver
            • 7 years ago

            I’m curious about that as well.
            side note – I do have the money now, but if I wait until next week I’ll have [i<]extra[/i<] money

      • Washer
      • 7 years ago

      You’re broke but looking to buy a pointless electronic device? I’m confused.

      EDIT: Oh oh you do have the $200 but if you spent it then you’d be broke. I’m still confused.

    • jjj
    • 7 years ago

    And it’s pretty much certain that it has no microSD slot.Was actually thinking of buying one but now i’m just pissed at Google for ruining the device like that.

      • HighTech4US2
      • 7 years ago

      It does not have a microSD slot. It is not a deal breaker for me.

      Hopefully the larger Nexus tablets (future releases) will add this feature.

      Google Nexus 7 Specs:
      [url<]http://www.modaco.com/page/news/_/android/world-exclusive-full-nexus-7-details-r615[/url<]

      • wierdo
      • 7 years ago

      Same here, it’s such a small thing, I don’t now why they do that, come on Google, so close.

        • DancinJack
        • 7 years ago

        They want you to buy stuff from the Play store, that’s why.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 7 years ago

          Assuming it supports MTP (which ICS devices do) then I don’t quite get your reasoning. They just don’t want you to put a lot on it at a time, I guess.

            • pcgeek86
            • 7 years ago

            Precisely my thoughts. There are many other ways to load content besides the Play Store (including over wifi).

            • DancinJack
            • 7 years ago

            As far as movies are concerned, you can only hold them for 30 days and play them for 24 hours. I guess they assume tablets are primarily video consumption devices (which I agree with for the most part). So, rent a few movies, and rent some more! says Google.

            Plus, to rent movies or buy music you’re going to have to have a wifi connection for this thing. So download and cache all you want for the time you know you’re not going to have wifi. Then do the same thing when you’re at wifi again.

            I know it isn’t awesome. I wish it had an SD slot too. I was just saying they want you to spend money in the Play store is why I think it doesn’t have an SD card slot.

          • mcnabney
          • 7 years ago

          And how many movies will this hold? The damn thing will be full once I move my books and music onto it. How big will a Google Play movie be? It needs expandable storage! My mobile hotspot on my smartphone will allow it to be used anywhere, but those GBs aren’t free anymore, Google. You need more local storage or expand-ability, period!

            • superjawes
            • 7 years ago

            I WANT A SMARTPHONE WITH 3TB…AND CAN PLAY CRYSIS.

            • mcnabney
            • 7 years ago

            A microSD slot is the exact same thing as increasing the power of the device!

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            WITH TITS.

        • lilbuddhaman
        • 7 years ago

        They want you to put data on the cloud…so they can look at it…analyze it…and sell the resulting data.

      • paulWTAMU
      • 7 years ago

      why the hell this is so hard for tablet makers to grasp I don’t get. My primary point in buying a tablet would be media consumption. Let me store some goddamn media on the thing! 16 gigs is paltry.

        • bthylafh
        • 7 years ago

        I can’t imagine it would have added that much cost to include a card slot. Maybe it wouldn’t have fit with the psychologically important $199 price point, though.

          • paulWTAMU
          • 7 years ago

          I wish it was at least on the 249 one 🙁

            • HighTech4US2
            • 7 years ago

            If it did I would have gladly paid the extra $50.

            • paulWTAMU
            • 7 years ago

            Me too. These quarterly business trips are getting old, it’d be nice to be able to browse the web, read my funnies, watch online videos, etc.

      • cynan
      • 7 years ago

      Step 1. Root tablet (pending rootability of Jelly Bean)
      Step 2. Install Stickmount app (adding USB host capability)
      Step 3. Purchase short micro USB -> USB female adapter
      Step 4. Use USB flash drives or USB SD card reader when you need external storage.

      Not the most elegant solution, but works with the Galaxy Nexus phone and offers a bit more flexibility as far as external storage goes.

        • funko
        • 7 years ago

        nice, didnt know about this. thanks!

        • mcnabney
        • 7 years ago

        That was my thought. What functionality will be lost when rooting this device?

          • DancinJack
          • 7 years ago

          Rooted devices can’t rent movies from the Play Store, as far as I know.

            • jcamel24
            • 7 years ago

            Sure they can, you just have to use Voodoo Rootkeeper to temporarily unroot.

            • mcnabney
            • 7 years ago

            Good. Serves Google right for gimping their own device.

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