Release roundup: Adata, Cooler Master, and Lian Li

Every week, we gather press releases that slipped through the net of our daily coverage, and we post them in the release roundup. This week, we’ve got news from Adata, Cooler Master, and Lian Li:

  • Adata launches ultimate performance XPG SX910. Here comes another solid-state drive based on SandForce’s SF-2281 controller. This one is a little different, though. Adata claims to have implemented "new optimized firmware" to maximize NAND flash utilization, so the drive is available with full capacities of 128GB, 256GB, and 512GB. By contrast, other SF-2281-based SSDs generally serve up 120GB, 240GB, and 480GB of storage space. Also, Adata covers these puppies with a five-year warranty, which beats most of the competition by two years. The only downside seems to be pricing—$189.99, $379.99, and $749.99 for the 128GB, 256GB, and 512GB variants, respectively. That’s not exactly cheap, considering you can find 240GB drives based on the same controller (but with a shorter warranty) for $199.99.

  • Cooler Master intros Silent Pro M2 power supplies. This new PSU series succeeds Cooler Master’s existing Silent Pro M lineup. The company says it’s boosted the amperage on the all-important 12V rail, implemented a new 3.3v DC-to-DC board to improve power efficiency, and switched out the fan for a 135-mm spinner featuring a quieter and longer-lasting hydraulic bearing. Prices are $119.99, $139.99, and $399.99, respectively, for the 620W, 720W, and 1500W units. Cooler Master quotes a June release time frame. Sure enough, the 620W and 720W models are already in stock at Newegg with the announced price tags.

  • Lian Li Announces EATX chassis with front-mounted PSU. The belly of this new aluminum beast is large enough to accommodate Extended ATX motherboards—that is, king-sized workstation models with multiple CPU sockets. This chassis comes with a slight twist, because it tucks the power supply right under the storage bays at the front of the case. (There’s an AC cable extension that loops around to the back, so the front bezel won’t be marred by a jutting power connector.) Lian Li says the PC-V750’s drive bays can play host to six 3.5" hard drives and one 2.5" drive, which mounts to the bottom of the drive cage. You can stick a 3.5" drive in the lone optical bay, too, and mount a couple of additional drives to the floor of the chassis. Other amenities include USB 3.0 connectivity and a whopping five 120-mm fans. Lian Li is charging $319 for the black and silver versions of the PC-V750; it also offers a model with a side-panel window for $349.

Adata isn’t the only SSD maker to offer a SandForce SF-2281-based drive with a five-year warranty. Intel’s 520 Series SSDs also have that distinction. However, the Intel drives do have slightly lower capacities of 120GB, 240GB, and 480GB.

Comments closed
    • glynor
    • 7 years ago

    Cyril, you have a formatting error in this article. The text way at the bottom seems to belong to the first “mini-story” about the Adata SSDs, but is showing up by itself after the Lian Li blurb.

    [quote<]Adata isn't the only SSD maker to offer a SandForce SF-2281-based drive with a five-year warranty. Intel's 520 Series SSDs also have that distinction. However, the Intel drives do have slightly lower capacities of 120GB, 240GB, and 480GB.[/quote<]

    • Squeazle
    • 7 years ago

    One does wonder why the PSU would be front mounted if the cord still plugs in at the back…

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      Space, shape, and cooling? If this were not made to accomodate larger ATX boards, you could shorten the height down to a normal ATX board in height without widening the chasis. And with it in the front, the PSU will only heat up your hard drives, SSDs, and optical drives, which aren’t as heat sensitive as CPUs and GPUs, and also have their working componenets shielded.

        • Squeazle
        • 7 years ago

        Cool, makes sense. I was just thinking of the cabling leading over to the PSU being a little obtuse, but that’s easier to deal with than heat, or other spacial issues. Thanks for the perspective!

      • Washer
      • 7 years ago

      I don’t follow. The purpose of front mounted PSUs isn’t to have a front attaching power cord. It helps reduce height of the case, a nice touch on an otherwise very large case.

      EDIT: superjaws beat me to it by a minute!

        • superjawes
        • 7 years ago

        Bazinga

    • entropy13
    • 7 years ago

    The Silent Pro M2 are made by Enhance.

    • chuckula
    • 7 years ago

    If possible, a review of that Lian Li chassis would be very welcome since it’s nice to see a chassis with some good features that doesn’t have flames shooting out or other “aesthetic” touches.

      • albundy
      • 7 years ago

      +1 on that request!

        • moose17145
        • 7 years ago

        Completely agree. The case looks like the most interesting thing in this article. So far though i still have my heart set on that massive corsair 800D chassis that tr did a review on a while back. This case does look like something i would seriously consider tho depending its features and attention to detail on some of the smaller things.

        Edit: spelling and such

      • Chrispy_
      • 7 years ago

      Good for anyone looking to build a dual-socket, TASTEFUL looking workstation.

      • StashTheVampede
      • 7 years ago

      Are there other makers of front mounted PSU designs that don’t support EATX?

      • Washer
      • 7 years ago

      Thankfully this isn’t near the problem it use to be. Between Lian Li, Silverstone, Corsair, Fractal Design and others there are plenty of classy, feature rich case options in a wide range of prices these days.

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