Microsoft to offer cheap Windows 8 upgrades to everyone

You get a cheap Windows 8 upgrade! And you get a cheap Windows 8 upgrade! Everyone gets a cheap Windows 8 upgrade!

Yes, it seems, Microsoft has started channeling Oprah. On its Blogging Windows, er, blog, Microsoft has announced that just about anyone running Windows XP, Windows Vista, or Windows 7 will be entitled to a downloadable Windows 8 Professional upgrade for only $39.99—once the new operating system comes out, of course. Packaged upgrade DVDs will be available for $69.99, for folks with slow connections who’d rather not download the whole thing.

As icing on the cake, users who get a discounted upgrade will be able to snag a free copy of Media Center via Windows 8’s "add features" option. Microsoft explained earlier this year that, in Windows 8, Media Center will an "economical ‘media pack’ add-on," not a built-in feature like in Windows 7 and Vista. It sounds like early adopters will be able to skip the "economical" part and move right on to "free."

The $39.99 upgrade promotion comes on the heels of another, similar offer, which Microsoft extended to buyers of new Windows 7 machines last month. Since June 2, certain new Windows 7 PCs have been eligible for $14.99 upgrades to Windows 8 Pro.

Both that upgrade offer and the one announced this week are scheduled to end on January 31, 2013. Since Windows 8 is due out this fall, that deadline should leave plenty of time for even stragglers to snag the new OS. Microsoft says both offers are available in 131 markets, too, which should cover just about everywhere (though the company doesn’t list countries).

Comments closed
    • End User
    • 7 years ago

    Whoa! [url<]http://goo.gl/miO8D[/url<]

    • End User
    • 7 years ago

    Desperate times call for desperate measures.

      • Krogoth
      • 7 years ago

      This move is meant to get people hook onto App Store, nothing else.

      Windows 8 offers nothing compelling to the current 7/Vista userbase to warrant an upgrade.

      The current XP crowd either has hardware that is too old to take advantage of 8, 7 and Vista or software that depends on older software platforms. They are a moot point in the equation.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        i asked my mom what she thought about a windows app store. she thought it was amazing. i spent an hour removing a number of viruses she had on her system. she’s not ancient, 49, and reasonably tech savvy, but if she could get the crap she wants, without the other issues, she’d love it.

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]Windows 8 offers nothing compelling to the current 7/Vista userbase to warrant an upgrade.[/quote<] Not entirely true. Win 8 has several improvements on the kernel over 7 such as revised scheduling, better power managements, better networking stack etc.

          • Kaleid
          • 7 years ago

          I doubt most will notice. They will however notice the UI.

    • Kaleid
    • 7 years ago

    Give me 40 bucks and I’ll consider “upgrading”.

    • moog
    • 7 years ago

    Maybe Americans have grown enamored with their iSomethings and Europeans have always hated Microsoft on principle, but Microsoft still has fans in the rest of the world!

    I’m guessing MrSofty will break even with this release and are hoping for more love next year with Win9.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      if they ‘broke even’ it would be a massive failure. with 5 billion (i realize across all divisions) in profit, breaking even in windows would be a disaster.

        • sschaem
        • 7 years ago

        MS spent 9.6 billion for its R&D budget last year.
        Apple in contrast spent 2.4 billion

        MS will have a hard time pushing windows8 as an ‘upgrade’ (This 49$ deal smell desperation), so most of MS money will come from forcing OEM to pre-install windows8 and the 30% they take from Metro developers.

        And if windows8 tablets are a flop because they is no software for them, and people choose windows7 desktop and laptop over metro, MS is going to have a rude awakening.

        MS cant grab its competitor market, and is about to be eaten for lunch by Google/Apple

          • Madman
          • 7 years ago

          Preinstall OEM PCs with Win8 with secure UEFI, Linux and Win7 cannot be installed anymore – PROFIT!

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            win 7 and linux CAN be installed. quit being silly. Usually Madman, i find you to be quite clever, but your current posts have been silly, misleading, or simply wrong. please do better!

            • Madman
            • 7 years ago

            Ok, I was exaggerating, they can be installed. But you have to disable secure boot, which will be on by default on all Win8 certified machines.

            And turning the feature off could be as simple as flipping a switch in BIOS or as difficult as waiting for 3rd party patched ROM which you’ll have to flash.

            At least that’s the vibe I got from random internet sources.

            So buying a Win8 certified machine, and downgrading might be a lot more difficult than some people might expect. We will see if that will be the case.

            • End User
            • 7 years ago

            Much like your own.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            that might be true. but i’m a moron. does he want to be one too?

    • LoneWolf15
    • 7 years ago

    If my father taught me one thing, it’s that garbage priced cheaply is still garbage.

    EDIT: And the sad thing is, all it would take for this to not be garbage is to give users the choice of how they want to run their desktop –but apparently Microsoft knows better than their user-base.

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      They want a piece of the ‘app store’ concept (mafia style racketeering).

      On the desktop they cant do that because their is no competition and its an open system.
      With Metro, they can lock user to the Metro app store and in turn collect 30% from developers since no competition would be allowed or exist. (Taken directly from Apple money making playbook)

      MS want to make sure services like steam wont work so their is no competition and developers are forced to give 30% of their revenue to be listed on a download portal … kind of sick.

      I’m not sure how this is allowed. Its like making a car with a special fuel cap that is only compatible with service station owned by the same company. And gas company have to give 30% of their revenue if its sold at those stations.
      This in effect remove any form of competition and create an extortion mechanism of suppliers.

      This is outrageous, and exactly what Apple as done and what MS want to do…

        • WaltC
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]They want a piece of the 'app store' concept (mafia style racketeering). On the desktop they cant do that because their is no competition and its an open system. With Metro, they can lock user to the Metro app store and in turn collect 30% from developers since no competition would be allowed or exist. (Taken directly from Apple money making playbook)[/quote<] Are you sure you aren't talking about Apple?...;) Gee guy, my copy of Win8 happily installs anything and everything that my copy of Win7 installs. You are somewhat confused on "Metro." First of all, Metro is an interface *option* for developers. It's there for those developers who chose to use it in their programs. It isn't *required* in any way, shape or form by Win8. The other day just for testing purposes I installed my original Rune game (not the hacked up version HHS is currently offering on Steam) and without difficulty got it up and running in Win8 just like I have done with Win7 and the game. I can assure your that at no time was I ever prompted to "Insert Metro interface programming or abort install"...! So, your first mistake comes in thinking that Metro GUI usage is required to program for Windows 8. It simply is not. The 30% overhead from the Microsoft store is *also* optional for developers, too! No developer anywhere has to use the Microsoft store if he doesn't want to. Win8 desktops around the globe will happily run all of the umpteen-gazillion x86, windows-compatible programs there are whose developers never heard of "Metro"...;) But, if you are a developer who chooses to use Metro, selling it through the Microsoft store is optional--there's no requirement for developers to sell their Metro apps through the Microsoft store, either. As I said--this isn't Apple we are talking about. I think some developers will choose to go the route of the Microsoft store because Microsoft will offer them perks for doing so that at the moment they cannot get anywhere else--especially much smaller, independent developers. It is those developers, rather than the established software names in the business, who will find the MS store an appealing prospect. Why? Because they know, as small independents, that 70% of something is far better than 100% of nothing...;) The Microsoft Store will give small developers like this enormous exposure and publicity that these developers could get nowhere else because they get it from Microsoft for pennies on the dollar compared to nation-wide ad campaigns.

          • sschaem
          • 7 years ago

          a) I didn’t say you couldn’t install ‘legacy’ app on windows8. What I’m pointing out is that you cant use windows8 without being faced with Metro.

          b) How do you let your user download your Metro app? Because from all I can tell developers need special tools to do QA on non developers system because Metro app cant be installed outside of the app store. Business have a complex alternative, but I dont see how this can be hacked for end users.

          The red flag is not about windows8 not being able to run ‘legacy’ windows app,
          but the fact that MS , like Apple, wants full control of the app store to charge anything they want.

          First step to make sure Metro is used, remove the start menu so each windows8 user MUST face Metro on a daily basis.

          Look at the Metro app replacement of native windows app… huge downgrade.
          Even the basic games they include with windows7 are now pathetic. check solitaire.

          BTW, I cant run solitaire on my windows8 build anymore because it need Metro App store certification, and the app store version is not compatible with the consumer preview.

          Anyone embracing this level of iron fist control over their software got totaly brain washed πŸ™
          Specially when the resulting apps are pieces of crap compared to native windows.

      • WaltC
      • 7 years ago

      Well, then I’m glad my father taught me a slightly different lesson: If I can buy my Porsche for 30% of MSRP then I’d be a “danged fool” to insist on paying MSRP for the exact same car. Why some people insist on paying more than they have to for things has always been puzzling.

      BTW, are you running the consumer release of Windows 8? My screen boots to a lovely desktop scene that doesn’t have a single tile on it–and that’s stock configuration. Not only that, but there’s a plain-Jane Windows 7 desktop just a couple of mouse clicks away that I can festoon with shortcuts–just like I do with my desktop in Windows 7. It happily runs themes, etc. You can move the taskbar up or sideways, just like with Win7 (I like my taskbar at the top.) As for the screens with tiles on them, I can configure them in a variety of ways–from nearly invisible, to grossly in-my-face (I prefer somewhat in between.) Basically, your argument about the desktop in Windows 8 doesn’t hold water.

      Then, too, there’s the fact that between the two OSes, Windows 8 Pro is comparable to the Windows 7 Ultimate release in terms of features–and you can happily go from Windows 7 Home Premium straight to Windows 8 Pro for $39.99. Fantastic deal in my book and I’d be retarded in the extreme to thumb my nose at it in the belief that if it only [i<]cost a lot more [/i<] it would be so-o-o-oo much better. Uh-uh. No way, no how. The last bit of goodness that Windows 8 offers me is all under the hood. I particularly like this feature: in Windows 8 you can now simply download the ISO of your choice to a drive, and after the download is complete you can just right click the ISO to bring up its associated context menu and you'll find that some things have changed. Instead of "burn disk image" being the first option, that option has now been moved to the second position. First position is..."Mount this disk" (or something very close to that.) So you download the ISO, select the "Mount disk" option, and the OS mounts the ISO with an actual drive letter and all of it is immediately accessible just as if you had first burned the ISO to CD or DVD and put it in a physical drive! You can run "Setup" on the mounted ISO and the program will install from the mounted drive just like it would from an actual CD or DVD in a physical drive! One of the main differences, of course, is *speed*! Not only does it cut out the middleman disk activities, but it is *much faster* all around, too. Yeah--you can kind of do this with hack software installs now in Win7 and earlier--the huge difference is that now this is supported directly, officially by the OS! The ramifications of this are huge--but I know you can figure them out...;) Don't need the mounted ISO anymore? Just right click the mounted drive, select "eject" from the context menu, and your mounted ISO instantly disappears. Of course your original ISO file stays right where it is. Windows 8 has a lot of goodies like this inside, imo. It's too bad people get hung up on tiles they don't even have to look at very much if they choose not to. After using this OS awhile, even in this pre-release package, I don't even think about the tiles anymore. Everything else is just so much more interesting. Although I still boot into Win7 nine out of every ten times, I catch myself trying to do things in Win7 that I casually do in Windows 8--and when I notice it it's usually funny...;) I mean, it was just downright short-sighted of Microsoft not to put Win8 stuff into Win7 'fore they shipped it, wasn't it?

        • Madman
        • 7 years ago

        It’s obvious you don’t do any productivity work on PC. Win8 is a cludge because of Metro when it comes to productivity, and it will become even worse if we will have more real Metro apps.

          • WaltC
          • 7 years ago

          So, is there some rule somewhere says you *have to* buy Win8? I think MS plans to support Win7 for several more years beyond the Win8 ship date. It’s obvious you don’t like it–so don’t buy it, even at $39.99…;)

          If by “productivity” you mean spread sheets and word processing and programming, then I guess I do qualify. But if you mean running older company-supplied productivity programs that don’t support Windows 8 very well, if at all, then I’d agree. But then, they said the *exact same thing* about Windows 7, too–and were only marginally mollified by the the WinXP emulation available in select versions of Win7–specifically for those companies who had paid out lots of bucks to software companies for custom apps who had disappeared by the time Win7 rolled around–disappeared at least for the purposes of updating that expensive software…;)

            • Madman
            • 7 years ago

            There is no hard and fast rule, but usually, Windows version N-1 disappears as an option as soon as Windows N appears. As soon as Win8 is released, most OEM PCs will be Win8, and shops will have, mostly, only Win8 retail boxes available. So it’s naive to assume regular Joe will be offered a Win7 when buying a new PC. I’m pretty sure he will get a UEFI locked, Win8 preinstalled PC which will be PITA to down-convert to Win7.

            Support and easy access/availability are two different things.

            Strange, I have similar workflow and I constantly find Win8 getting in a way… And I can’t find any scenario where Metro app ‘clicked’ – yes, that’s what I want, that will make my job easier! I’m mostly finding annoyances.

            Again, as I said already, if Win8 had boot to desktop + start menu, then general snappiness improvements and GUI polish would make me call it the best Windows ever.

            • sschaem
            • 7 years ago

            Windows7 : windows key -> open a non intrusive menu (your desktop content is visible) -> type paint and return and paint open
            Windows8 : widows key -> big flash, some fast food ordering inspired UI now covers your entire desktop -> type paint-> the screen flash back to the desktop, then flash again when paint open

            The issue is this freaking full screen Metro bullshit. Its totally unnecessary, and it look ridiculous.

            Its like decorating a law office with Sesame street wall paper, its distracting and inappropriate.

            And because Metro use squares, all my app name take 3 or more lines and are most often truncated.

            windows7 start menu entry example :

            “[X] Computer Management”

            windows8

            “Computer
            Managem..
            [X]

            Really ?
            Really microsof… ?

    • Decelerate
    • 7 years ago

    Seriously, who switched Microsoft’s DNA overnight? First the Surface Tablet (the name sucks however), and now upgrade prices that reminds of Apple?

    Good moves (in general), but damn, who’s at the helm? I really, really don’t think it’s Ballmer, because I never saw a mega-corporation CEO do a 180 during a single tenure. This feels too “fresh” for Steve B.

      • Malphas
      • 7 years ago

      Sinofsky has a lot of sway over the Windows division (which includes Surface), which is where most of these changes originate.

        • Decelerate
        • 7 years ago

        If so, I really do hope he’ll get to replace Ballmer soon.

    • Deanjo
    • 7 years ago

    I would rather them give me a $50 check refund and a free downgrade to Windows 7 on Windows 8 shipping PC’s.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 7 years ago

      Maybe a $50 payment to extend Win7 support another 5-10 years?

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        Actually the last machine I bought with windows pre-installed on it I got a refund check for the Windows license since I did not agree to the EULA. $70 from Acer.

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]Microsoft to offer cheap Windows 8 upgrades to everyone[/quote<] [b<][i<]"Everyone"[/i<] being [i<]"users of desktop and notebook PC's"[/i<][/b<] I've had a W8 desktop VM running for ages, and last month I rebuilt a laptop with Windows8. The laptop Windows8 experience is about as bad as it gets. trying to mimic slide and swipe gestures with a touchpad is epic fail. Using a nipple (I believe 'trackpoint' is the official word for nipple) it's a complete joke. As in, "I'm serious. you are joking, right, Microsoft?"

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      I did an analysis of the sample Metro app when I installed Windows8 consumer preview to see how MS implemented the mouse/keyboard support in their ‘touch centric’ universe of Metro.

      I came to the conclusion that it was also an epic failure. MS was not able to make both concept co-exist gracefully.

      BTW, When I tried again to check the metro apps I get “This version of windows is not supported by the app store anymore” and their is a link to upgrade, that bring me to the windows7 page…. chuckle, how right they are πŸ™‚

      anyways the issue is that simple operation like panning is normally done with a finger swipe on a touch device. MS in their glorious insight decided to make this be auto hide scroll bar at the bottom of the page. (I expected to see a ‘grab’ function on non active area to emulate swipe.)
      The end result is that you need to find hidden hot spot to emulate touch functionality.

      So even Mouse+keyboard become second citizen in windows8, not just track pad.

      • cygnus1
      • 7 years ago

      says you

    • Beelzebubba9
    • 7 years ago

    Honestly – who uses the start menu for much anyway?

    As a hybrid OS X/Windows user, I’ve been launching programs using the search features or the taskbar for years now. The start menu was never a particularly brilliant UI paradigm, and was even less useful for the power user. I (obviously) can’t speak for anyone else’s usage models, but the the qq’ing over the loss of the start menu has me a bit baffled….

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      Its a quick way to access common features in a non obstructive UI.
      Much cleaner then having to find a hot spot on the screen to access some hidden full screen menu.
      Also the metro start screen is a bitch to decipher specially when 99% of the app name get cut and placed on multiple line.
      Squares are NOT the way to layout names/labels, its UI 101.

      Metro vs windows7
      Open the document you work on last night. Two click and your there.
      Need to access your most common app, organized in a readable fashion, two click away.
      Need to access the control pannel, two click.
      Want to go directly to core folder (document/picures/…) Two click.

      And most importantly all this in a central place that open cleanly, not hidden, using only the real estate space it need using a concise and clear layout.
      Everything Metro is not : full screen, hard to organize and less functionality.

      But ok on folder access : Under windows8 they have a “File Explorer” quick lunch on the task bar to replace the start menu.
      So you can access your picture with one click and a double click.
      The issue is that if you click “File Explorer” again, it minimize your picture folder, as the “file explore” group was removed on the task bar by the opened instance.
      Now that intuitive… sigh

      Windows8 is a cluster fuck. Tablet users dont see the mess trying to patch together desktop and Metro, two completely different ‘OS’ they only see the clean Touch Base OS. But desktop users get screwed.

      So no. Not everyone find the start menu useless, and the full screen metro concept better.

      And BTW, cant you type the “Windows Key” and type the app name to start , like in windows 8? So its not like windows8 bring ANYTHING to desktop user, it just removed stuff and make the rest painful to use.

      Stop finding excused to love windows8. Open your eyes, its just a POS on the desktop.

    • obarthelemy
    • 7 years ago

    We already got a 100 euro 3-pack upgrade last time around. This is piecemeal, but the same.

    • faramir
    • 7 years ago

    Sooo … if I was to offer cheap sucker punches (only $39.99 to smash your nose) I’d have people queueing up for beatings in no-time ? This must be what M$ is thinking because they clearly haven’t grasped how incredibly sucky Windows 8 is going to end up being just yet (it’s going to make Millenium/Vista look like an irrelevant oopsie compared to Windows 8),

    • crsh1976
    • 7 years ago

    Honest question here, I haven’t really followed the whole Win 8 thing aside from looking at Metro screenshots and what not.

    Is it possible to disable the Metro UI to fall back on a basic desktop with a start button?

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      no. it’s the metro screen only for the start menu.

        • Shouefref
        • 7 years ago

        …… and that’s what makes it really awfull.

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      Nope MS took some extra step to completely eradicate this functionality.

      BTW, I think 80% of the people would not be spitting on windows8 if it kept the start menu.

        • EtherealN
        • 7 years ago

        Agreed. That move has made me very suspicious of 8. I mean, it doesn’t necessarily have to be a bad thing, but it definitely makes me feel suspicious. It’ll be one of those where I’ll definitely not be an early adopter.

    • jdaven
    • 7 years ago

    I asked for this in a post some months ago and some of you said I was dreaming. Glad I got my wish. For the rest of you, why were you so opposed to cheap windows upgrades similar to the new Mac OS model?

      • blastdoor
      • 7 years ago

      Because they hadn’t been told that’s what they’re supposed to think. Now they know, so they will fall in line.

      • torquer
      • 7 years ago

      Because the nerd hive mind loves OS X, but hates iOS & Apple in general.

    • Ricardo Dawkins
    • 7 years ago

    wow…looks like my days of pirating Windows will be over in the foreseeable future.

    • bfar
    • 7 years ago

    this is pure business strategy. This upgrade offer will only amount to pocket change – about 1-2% of the total amount of licences sold over the life time of the OS. Microsoft have pleny of experience, they know that if they get enthusiasts upgrading early then they will generate momentum, interest, and a vocal community who will hassle 3rd party vendors into get their drivers and software up to scratch.

    Like many others I lament the end of the pure point-and-click interface, but we also have to acknowledge that fact that the PC interface has become much more ergonomically diverse in the past couple of years. Personal computers now come in all shapes, sizes and form factors. Make no mistake about it, smartphones, tablets and TVs are all personal computers now. And there are more to come. The mouse is one of the greatest human machine interaction inventions of all time, but it’s no longer the only game in town. Microsoft must open up their software eco system to this new world. If they don’t, then they will remain entrenched in the traditional desktop/laptop market which is increasingly at risk to a deluge of aggressive competition.

    I’m as sceptical about Metro as the next man, but I applaud what Microsoft are trying to achieve with Windows 8, because once it’s released, no other company will have a software eco-system that covers such a broad range of hardware and software.

      • oldog
      • 7 years ago

      “The mouse is one of the greatest human machine interaction inventions of all time…”

      I would argue that the most important human interactive tool is the finger. The mouse, keyboard and touch are all extensions of this simple fact. Why not have them all at your disposal to control a machine.

      Say a car?

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]Why not have them all at your disposal to control a machine.[/quote<] Because I don't want your greasy fingers on my screen.

          • Anonymous Coward
          • 7 years ago

          Hah, downvoted! Revenge of the touchy-feely crowd.

            • oldog
            • 7 years ago

            Human hand and brain evolution occurred simultaneously. I would argue (and have) that all higher human thought is directly related to advancing dexterity of the hand.

            The piano can be played blindfolded. A touch typist is a marvel to watch.

            Don’t be afraid to touch things. Put on gloves if need be.

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      Google and Apple realized that one size doesn’t fit all, so its nice to unify devices, but forcing touch display on software designed for desktop, like MS is doing with metro, is not to be admired, but despised.

      MS must have done their research that offering the upgrade for anything more then 50$ would be a total flop.

      If Windows8 was really a smashing upgrade, I would have paid 100$. For me its not even worth 50$ to virtually downgrade.

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        Sad thing is that all it would take is for them to give a damn start button back and enable booting to a standard desktop and Win 8 would be gladly accepted by pretty much everyone.

          • sschaem
          • 7 years ago

          Me to. I would be even ok to pay extra for Windows Media Center (If it was improved)

          I actually have no idea is WMC is improved in any ways in Windows8…

          If its the same (as I saw in the consumer preview) whats the point.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            There has been zero changes to WMC, MS has already marked it deprecated as well but will offer it yet for one more version of windows, that being Windows 8.

            • sschaem
            • 7 years ago

            So you now have to pay for the same version that was free in Windows7, with zero improvement.
            MS, how many ways can you think of pissing off your enthusiast followers.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            Ya I imagine they want people to start using the crap metro UI as a front end for media playback.

            • sschaem
            • 7 years ago

            Media Center #1 purpose is the TV feature and the 10ft experience.

            Does Metro media system support DVR and cable card and is remote control friendly ?
            I really dont know as metro is broken in the consumer preview build. But I recall the photo app to be beyond pathetic.

            But I guess MS is crazy enough to think that they are going to make touch screen TV the hippest thing to have….

            Side note: I’m starting to see many people predicting that MS big gamble is already a failure…
            And not sure if its true, but OEM pissed not only it core enthusiast community, but also its OEM.

    • slaimus
    • 7 years ago

    Not all that surprising…

    I got in on the similar Windows 7 offer, where you can get a boxed upgrade for $49.99 with free shipping in the first few months.

    Microsoft knows that it makes all of its OS money on new hardware, and people upgrading is just icing on the cake.

    • odizzido
    • 7 years ago

    That’s a good price, and if I were running XP or Vista I might be tempted.

    I have no interest in switching from W7, but good on MS for offering this.

    • odizzido
    • 7 years ago

    That’s a good price, and if I were running XP or Vista I might be tempted.

    I have no interest in switching from W7, but good on MS for offering this.

    • sweatshopking
    • 7 years ago

    One thing people seem to be missing in their “oh no! MS knows they’re screwed, and now won’t make any money by offering this to people for less money” rants is the fact that this will almost ENTIRELY be consumers. it is an UPGRADE edition, not standalone, and most businesses don’t jump on a new OS in the first 3 months it’s out. this will ALMOST ENTIRELY MISS THE ENTERPRISE MARKET. this will be a few keen consumers, such as myself, and help in getting it out there for other people to see. It will have very little impact on the total revenue of windows 8.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 7 years ago

      It might actually make them money. I think they’re acknowledging that it will be tough to sell people a new laptop if they already have a functional one, and that was how people “upgraded” in the past. While Windows 8 will certainly sell tablets, that isn’t going to appeal to everyone right out the gate.

        • l33t-g4m3r
        • 7 years ago

        ‘It might actually (help) make them money.” Yeah, through the APP store. Microsoft’s version of the Free to Play model.

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          you say that like it’s a bad thing. i’d LOVE a way to get my family applications where i don’t have to worry about viruses and “where do i find the download link”, etc. i don’t care that they take a cut. i don’t mind on my phones, and i don’t mind on my desktop. IF they’re able to make it worth it, then people will use it. I play lots of f2p games too, so i don’t think your point makes sense.

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 7 years ago

            Makes sense when you use Open Source and Microsoft tries to strong arm it out of existance with trusted computing.

            [url<]http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/opensource/red-hat-linux-paying-to-get-past-uefi-restrictions-on-windows-8/3666[/url<] Microsoft wants to control apps like Apple, so I'm predicting they'll eventually encrypt the OS to make everything go through the APP store, making Open Source on Windows go extinct. Oh, and your analogy is flawed. We aren't living in the 90's, and most websites offer downloads of legitimate software, like Majorgeeks.com. Also, this argument raises the question of how competent are you, and should you even be on a pc?

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            ??????

            that article itself even states THEY’RE NOT PAYING MS, THEY’RE PAYING VERISIGN.

            EVERYONE has to get a license for secure booting. THAT’S SO MALWARE CAN’T RUN. IF IT WAS FREE, EVERYONE WOULD GET IT. Red hat themselves state it’s easy “by simply enrolling in the $99 one time fee to license UEFI.”

            You’re making an issue about nothing. it IS more secure, there’s no question. They’re NOT paying MS to use it. I’m not sure what’s confusing about this.

            [url<]http://news.softpedia.com/news/Windows-8-PCs-with-UEFI-Secure-Boot-Won-t-Lock-Out-Other-Platforms-223377.shtml[/url<] IF MS moves to make the entire OS function through the app store, we can talk. I'm honestly not sure i'd care THAT much, as open source apps could (and are) be distributed through the app store at no charge.

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]IF MS moves to make the entire OS function through the app store, we can talk. I'm honestly not sure i'd care THAT much[/quote<] No, you obviously don't care at all, and in fact admittedly WANT that to happen. [quote<]i'd LOVE a way to get my family applications where i don't have to worry[/quote<] "MALWARE CAN'T RUN" It just makes things harder. Also, what are you gonna do when the malware comes directly from Microsoft and the Government, ala Stuxnet? Nothing, really.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            I don’t see it as a threat if i download my apps through a distribution channel. You probably use the ubuntu store. both function almost identically, only the MS one is prettier.

            I’m aware it’s not UEFI is not impervious.

            i’m not worried about stuxnet. the “open” current system has shown itself to be a poor system of preventing infections, so your point is moot.

            you also failed to address the verisign issue. or the fact that the licensing is really quite reasonable.

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]you also failed to address the verisign issue[/quote<] Why would I when it's not a big issue? You said it yourself that, "the licensing is really quite reasonable." IMO, it's more of a potential problem, not an immediate or active one. The biggest hurdle is how distros are going to handle it. Seems like there isn't a standard response, and it's a lot of work.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            it’s a small amount of work, unless you count ubuntu, who can’t use grub2, due to the keys necessarily being public, which means the licensing would be revoked. Even in that case, they’re just going to use Intels.

            IF it’s a “potential problem, not an immediate or active one”, then why are you acting like it’s end times?

            sure, it might be work. So?

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 7 years ago

            So what? I’m not talking about UEFI, rather the cumulative effect endgame. Windows 8 on ARM is the basic scenario, but you could make that happen on x86 if you threw enough DRM at it.

            Oh, and if you think UEFI isn’t a problem to implement, you haven’t read enough on it. GIYF
            [url<]http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/opensource/red-hat-linux-paying-to-get-past-uefi-restrictions-on-windows-8/3666[/url<] [url<]http://www.infoworld.com/d/microsoft-windows/microsoft-red-hat-spar-over-secure-boot-loading-tech-173878[/url<]

            • EtherealN
            • 7 years ago

            As a sort of aside here, but your post made me think about it: anyone know some statistics on different malware vectors? Like, the percentages of infections that happen through downloads of infected software (trojans etc), worms, exploiting vulnerabilities in browsers (like cracking an ad server and getting all the ads of that service to attack systems browsing client sites) etcetera etcetera.

            Just struck me that I know which one’s I specifically would be most likely to fall victim to if any, but I’ve no clue what the actual worldwide picture is.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            I’m not sure. it’s an interesting question.

            • Yeats
            • 7 years ago

            [url<]http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=MTEyNDY[/url<]

    • Shouefref
    • 7 years ago

    Panic at MS?

    After reading the article:
    Yes, panic at MS.

    Metro was panic
    This offering is panic.

    MS’s online services are doing bad too. They’ve downgraded their online advertisment department (forgotten it’s name) for billions of dollars. And it includes… Bing!
    Bing got a bong.

      • torquer
      • 7 years ago

      Should probably make sure you’re spelling a word like “panic” correctly before you repeat it that many times.

      Microsoft has more money than God. They aren’t going anywhere anytime soon, much to the chagrin of aging nerds everywhere. Do you have a wallpaper image of Bill Gates as a Borg drone too?

      1999 called – it wants its nerd rage back. Apple is the new “evil empire” according to the internets – get with the times.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 7 years ago

        MS does appear to be in a hurry to show that they care about advanced users just as little as Apple does.

          • torquer
          • 7 years ago

          Oh I’m not defending everything that they do, not by a long shot. I’m just amused by the very predictable anti-Microsoft nerd rage. I’d wager most of the folks here whining about Metro haven’t used it. It may very well suck (I’ll be installing it on a laptop this weekend to mess around with it), but I’m not going to jump to conclusions until I actually see it myself and see how its implemented in the RTM build.

          In the end, mis-steps and all, Microsoft has done more for the PC enthusiast since Windows 98 than almost any other company. DirectX, despite its flaws, unified graphics hardware and allowed it to advance much faster than it otherwise may have. It also sped production of games and led to predictable performance, generally speaking.

          Other than the hardware companies themselves, who else has done more for PC gaming?

            • Shouefref
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]I'm just amused by the very predictable anti-Microsoft nerd rage. [/quote<] Instead of being amused by the very predictable anti-Microsoft nerd rage, one could ask oneself why there is such a huge anti-Microsoft nerd rage, and whether it's really an anti-Microsoft nerd rage, or something else. LIke an anti-Metro rage.

            • torquer
            • 7 years ago

            Anti-Microsoft nerd rage has existed since before the days of Windows 95. Now that Microsoft is less “the” tech company the nerd rage has been mostly refocused on Apple (with the notable exception of OS X since that gets a free pass for some reason) or a given hardware manufacturer. Metro is just the latest excuse.

            As I said Metro may be the worst thing to happen to Windows since the “Me” days, but I try not to have strong opinions about things that A. Haven’t been released and B. I haven’t personally used.

            • Krogoth
            • 7 years ago

            Metro is just meh.

            I don’t really care for it.

            It is just the old start menu on roids with an app-store front-end slapped on.

          • Beelzebubba9
          • 7 years ago

          The fringe needs of advanced users mean almost nothing to any company the size of Apple or Microsoft.

          And I really do mean fringe needs – removing the start menu does little to reduce the utility of Windows, but from the caterwauling coming out of nerdom you’d think MS was somehow black listing homophobic epithets from Xbox Live.

      • can-a-tuna
      • 7 years ago

      Take your pills and go to bed.

    • Anarchist
    • 7 years ago

    windows 8 … is not an upgrade.

      • Malphas
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]windows 8 ... is not an upgrade.[/quote<] Except it actually is and has numerous improvements, such as: a factory reset function saving you from having to do a full reinstall of the OS; storage virtualisation akin to Drobo Inc's BeyondRAID; more detailed information in Task Manager; UEFI secure boot support; robust USB 3.0 support; Microsoft Hyper-V - previously only available for Windows Server; faster boot times, lighter footprint and general performance/stability/reliability improvements. I think what you mean to say is that you don't like Metro. *yawn* Yes, very good, nothing reactionary and close-minded about that opinion.

        • Anarchist
        • 7 years ago

        each to his/her own … for me upgrade in the context of operating system has to do with more than a faster boot time and other frivolous non-sense. Having used w8 for a month now on dual core desktop with with 8G memory, 22″ non-touch monitor, keyboard and a mouse, I say w8 is a step backward in terms of usability for everyone who has to do more than watch netflix on their desktop.

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          what WOULD you consider an upgrade?

            • Anarchist
            • 7 years ago

            have you used w8 at all? are you guys microsoft employees trolling the web?

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            i have been running it on all my systems since the initial preview. i haven’t used any of my legit windows 7’s since. i find it extremely improved vs 7. I almost never use the startmenu, and find the right click in the bottom left more useful than the old start menu by far. i miss nothing from 7, but find much to like in 8, especially the cloud login and skydrive support. At first i found the charms bar annoying, but now find it more useful than having nothing on the right hand side. using 7, i find myself looking for it. I also like the integrated MSE, and the ability to “alt+tab” from the top left of the screen. i use that constantly. I DO use metro apps, like mail and people, quite a bit, and love the way notifications function on the OS. i also update the calendar app through my wp7 focus, and love how it all works together seamlessly. I realize it’s not for everyone, but so far, i love it.

            I WISH i was an MS employee, rather than an unemployed dude. Well, i guess technically i’m a student, who’s taking the summer off. i’m taking business, which i hate, but i get paid to go, so it’s not all bad.

            • sschaem
            • 7 years ago

            something better ?

            If you have a computer that is driven by a mouse and keyboard and manage large surface area,
            would an upgrade include a touch based application paradigm and full screen only presentation ?

            Metro on desktop is just wrong, MS forced a square peg in a round hole with a jackhammer “See it works”…

        • rrr
        • 7 years ago

        Obvious troll is obvious.

          • Malphas
          • 7 years ago

          Interesting outlook you have, where deliberated response is considered trolling while surly one liners aren’t. Well done not refuting anything I said.

            • rrr
            • 7 years ago

            I don’t have an outlook, I use gmail client. I advise you to do the same.

            And windows 8 is crap and no rhetoric devices change that. You don’t have any concrete evidence that it will not suck and have to BS around that fact.

        • sschaem
        • 7 years ago

        And all that is negated by the crap they force desktop user to go use.

        Really.. more detail in the task manager is in your top 5 features to get windows8 ?!

        Windows8 improved on a few key area that where OK (frankly windows7 boot time is the last thing I cared to see improved)
        But removed to many features and broke the smooth mouse+keyboard workflow.

        Forcing a touch screen design on a desktop is not working.

        Hence this is not an upgrade for desktop/laptop users… its a crazy mad experiment.

        • cegras
        • 7 years ago

        I agree, this knee jerk reaction is overkill.

    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    They should really be PAYING us to integrate their app store first and foremost into the OS we’ll all be using. I’m not saying that sarcastically either. Literally they could still make money of Windows 8 if they paid each Windows user to install it. Metro is like having iTunes pop up as soon as you start windows and you have to literally navigate around it in order to use the reset of the OS.

    I guess if it’s not free people wont get the hint that they’re making boat loads of money in some other way and it’s still worth buying.

    • Ifalna
    • 7 years ago

    Thanks Microsoft but uuh… I’ll stick with my Windows 7. No offense.

      • Mithent
      • 7 years ago

      Yep. Normally I’d take the opportunity, but not for Windows 8 with its sidelining of the desktop.

      • Parallax
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]Thanks Microsoft but uuh... I'll stick with my Windows 7. [s<]No offense.[/s<][/quote<] Fixed that for you. There's a time and place for offending people, especially if they learn from it and are better because of it.

        • Ifalna
        • 7 years ago

        Offending (or insulting for that matter) a person never.. gets your point across.
        State your opinion politely, if the other does not wish to hear it, there is nothing you can do to make him listen.

      • can-a-tuna
      • 7 years ago

      Which you most likely pirated anyway.

        • Ifalna
        • 7 years ago

        My university is in the Microsoft Academic Alliance (MSAA) program so I may use Win7 w/o charge.
        Before that I owned a licensed version of Vista Ultimate.
        Before that I owned a licensed version of Xp Home.
        Before that well… lets just say that they were the wild days of Win98. πŸ˜‰

    • ultima_trev
    • 7 years ago

    I hope this upgrade is extended to people who downloaded the Windows 8 Consumer Preview.

    I have a couple desktops running Windows 7 and feel no need to upgrade. I do have however a laptop running the Windows 8 Consumer Preview and if I could get Windows 8 Pro for 40 bucks I’d be all over that shizzle.

    • grantmeaname
    • 7 years ago

    It’s pr00f that wind0ze ate is bad!!!!!!!1111one

    • RickyTick
    • 7 years ago

    I think they just pushed ALL their chips onto the table.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 7 years ago

      The table isn’t big enough for all their chips.

        • sschaem
        • 7 years ago

        Yea, the surface area is just to limited…

      • Shouefref
      • 7 years ago

      That’s possible, but I think MS has loads of dollars in the war chest.

        • sschaem
        • 7 years ago

        Another round of Jerry Seinfeld commercials ?

    • blastdoor
    • 7 years ago

    Microsoft is running out of ways to make money. They just announced a $6 billion charge against earnings due to the total failure of their online strategy. They have to pay people billions to get them to use Windows Phone. XBox has always been break even at best (that’s a very generous interpretation). Zune was a bust. Now they are having the price they charge for regular Windows gutted.

    The only thing that seems to be holding up for them is Office. Yet they are intentionally denying themselves the profits to be made from selling Office on iPads in a desperate attempt to prop up their (no doubt soon to be money losing) tablet business.

    If I were king of Microsoft, I think I would immediately do the following:

    1. Kill Windows Phone
    2. Kill Metrofied Windows 8
    3. Kill Bing (take the fight to Google asymmetrically, as Apple is doing with Siri)
    4. Kill Xbox (make the PC the focus of gaming)
    5. Refocus Windows development on making Windows the best *professional* PC OS it can be. This is a battle Microsoft can win — they ought to be able to make a desktop/laptop OS that is better than anything else out there. They should be deeply embarrassed to be losing marketshare to the Mac, particularly in the enterprise. They can and should reverse that.
    6. Become the premier developer for productivity apps on the iPad. Get Office on the iPad, and make new apps for PCs and Macs that blow Adobe out of the water in terms of creating content for iPads. Also, develop games for iOS.
    7. Attempt a strategic partnership with Apple, a central component of which would be a deal whereby Microsoft gets to keep a larger share of the revenue from Office on the iPad in exchange for not selling Office for Android.

    With this approach, Microsoft would continue to make a lot of money off of the legacy PC platform while becoming the premier app developer for iOS platforms. They would also retain their role as king of the business software world, and be in the special position of bridging the PC and iOS worlds for business. Lots of money to be made following this approach.

      • Sargent Duck
      • 7 years ago

      wow….just wow. I’m speechless. With you at the helm Microsoft would cease to exist in about…a month. There is so much wrong.

        • l33t-g4m3r
        • 7 years ago

        I don’t think he’d be any worse than Ballmer.

          • Arag0n
          • 7 years ago

          Actually I think he would…. Microsoft just started to get all their act together. Maybe it has been against ballmer and not because ballmer, but changing CEO now and get someone that will go against the will of most of Microsoft executives would be a suicide move.

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 7 years ago

            And Windows8 isn’t a suicide move? Maybe we do need someone to go against the will of most Microsoft Executives. Microsoft’s biggest problem is that they’re all a bunch of sniveling yes men who can’t think for themselves.

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 7 years ago

            All the screaming and howling about Win8 is ridiculous.

            • Malphas
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]All the screaming and howling about Win8 is ridiculous.[/quote<] Yeah, reminds me of all the crying over the Taskbar changes in the run up to Windows 7, and all the crying about the general overhaul in Windows Vista, and the crying about the Luna theme and broken compatability in Windows XP, and the crying about reliability in Windows 9x, etc.

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 7 years ago

            All legitimate complaints, which shows you how competent Microsoft is in supporting their customers. This crap is why people need to switch to linux, so that there is some accountability with they money they spend.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            what? you’re now claiming that you hate the taskbar changes in 7? you think that they shouldn’t have done any kind of overhaul from xp? should have stuck with it forever?

            of course you don’t but people QQ hard when anything changes.

            • Malphas
            • 7 years ago

            Not really. Some were legitimate complaints (like reliability) which have since been gradually improved, admittedly perhaps not give as a high a priority as they should have been. But complaints about broken compatibility when moving from the MS-DOS based 9x line over to XP with its NT architecture is just mindless wailing. Same goes for a lot of the complaints with Vista, which were due to third party drivers or insufficient hardware. Windows 7 has the same underlying architecture as Vista, but gets none of the same flak because hardware and drivers have caught up with it. When you make a generation shift like 9x to XP, or XP to Vista, you’re going to get issues. Get over it.

            Microsoft will ignore complaints over Metro as they’ve ignored complaints over changes in the past, because it’s in their self interest to do so. If they acted on a handful of whining nerds about every upcoming OS they’d still be trying to sell MS-DOS.

            As for switching to Linux, “lol” yeah right.

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 7 years ago

            Well I have to admit that I [i<]still[/i<] think the XP theme is stupid looking, and that Win 9x was unstable trash...

            • Malphas
            • 7 years ago

            I don’t disagree, but in the grand scheme of things it’s irrelevant, was my point. At the end of the day at least it’s not Linux.

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 7 years ago

            Actually I prefer Linux to Windows, and have for over 10 years now. Its only software dependencies that keeps Windows in my house. (Well that, and the fact I currently prefer the annoying behavior of MS to the annoying behavior of Apple.)

      • LaChupacabra
      • 7 years ago

      54.3 billion dollars in gross profit on 69 billion in revenue last year. Best year for Microsoft ever. For refrence, Apple last year had 108 billion in revenue with 43 billion in gross profit. Microsoft is a profit making machine, do not forget.

        • blastdoor
        • 7 years ago

        Not sure where you’re getting your numbers. From Yahoo finance:

        [url<]http://finance.yahoo.com/q/ks?s=MSFT+Key+Statistics[/url<] [url<]http://finance.yahoo.com/q/ks?s=AAPL+Key+Statistics[/url<] Apple: $142 billion in revenue, $38.6 billion in profit (aka, net income applied to common shares) Microsoft: $73 billion in revenue, $23.3 billion in profit (aka, net income applied to common shares) These numbers are for the year ending in the first calendar quarter of 2012. Perhaps your numbers are for last calendar year? If so, it just goes to show how MS is standing still relative to Apple. In any event, I do not dispute that MS is generating a lot of cash off of aging Windows and Office franchises. But they are also burning huge amounts of money through wasteful acquisitions and other windmill tilting exercises. As for all other posts -- I can see that there is a culture of denial surrounding Microsoft. Windows Phone is a failure, get over it. Win tablets will fail. Microsoft has lost to Google in search. MS is letting traditional Windows rot on the vine while pursuing markets MS can never hope to win. The Xbox has been profitable lately, in a marginal sense, but that is on the back of huge initial losses, and huge damage done to PC gaming. My sense is that MS is in every bit as much denial of this reality as everyone else posting here. The good thing for MS is that Office is so deeply entrenched. They can squeeze a lot of cash out of Office for years to come, so plenty of time left to wake up.

          • cegras
          • 7 years ago

          Corporations persist through investments in R&D and/or acquisitions. Calling their expenditures ‘burning huge amounts of money’ is disingenuous.

          • ludi
          • 7 years ago

          Bing has been slowly gaining marketshare this year, and is close to 20% (relative to Google’s 65%). WP7 has been a winner in the tech press and a loser in marketshare, but the latter is arguably because Microsoft had no coherent platform support. If they can unify the Windows 8 experience from phone to tablet to laptop to corporate PC, then they have a chance to take back a significant portion of the next decade from Google and Apple, especially since both of those — by virtue of size and greed — are encountering some of the same closed-ecosystem restrictions and privacy problems that battered Microsoft in the late 90s and early 00s.

          Microsoft has a non-trivial stake in all of the following devices or markets:

          Phones (WP7, Nokia, remnants of Zune)
          Tablets (In-house, channel partners)
          Consoles (Xbox & Accessories)

          Laptops (OS, Office, Gaming)
          Desktops (OS, Office, Gaming)
          Servers (OS, Office, Backend Tools)

          Personal Email (Hotmail)
          Corporate Email (Exchange)
          Search & Advertising (Bing)

          There is an entire nascent ecosystem here, fully capable of once again unifying a person’s entire daily computing experience just as Windows did in the 90s. What Microsoft has lacked in the past decade was the vision to reassemble the disparate pieces into a coherent platform. Windows 8’s UI will annoy me to death for years, which is why I will probably be using Windows 7 as long as I used Windows XP. But any honest observer has to admit: it’s their best attempt yet to unify a lot disparate elements, and this may be their last chance to do so for quite a while.

            • blastdoor
            • 7 years ago

            I think their last chance has already passed. Their last chance was between 2007 and 2010 — post iPhone but pre-iPad. They completely blew it.

      • Malphas
      • 7 years ago

      If you were king of Microsoft then the stock would plummet overnight, the company would potentially get massive fines for attempting to collude with Apple in the way you suggested (which Apple would reject anyway), and the shareholders would force you out within the first year.

      You’re suggesting they drop things that actually make them money (e.g. Xbox) so they can focus on making Windows better for gaming and that they completely abandon potentially massive and growing markets like smartphones and tablets (which will both overtake PC’s in number) so they can focus on making a better professional/gaming PC OS, when they already dominate that market entirely anyway, with no competition in sight? What’s the point of that exactly?

      Your brain is clouded with nonsense and personal biases.

        • blastdoor
        • 7 years ago

        If I were CEO of Microsoft (rather than King), the things you’re suggesting most likely would happen. There’s no way a CEO of Microsoft could get away with doing what I’m suggesting. It’s far too radical, and Microsoft stakeholders are far too complacent.

        BTW, let me know when you think Windows Phone will crack 20% marketshare, when Windows tablets will crack 20% share, when Bing will make money, etc.

          • Malphas
          • 7 years ago

          I’m not saying I think they’re going to be hugely successful with tablets, smartphones or Bing, I think that’s mainly due to stiff competition these days though, rather than Microsoft incompetence, which wasn’t always the case in the past perhaps. But they have to at least attempt to compete in other markets besides making an OS for traditional PCs – which is a market that’s reached saturation point, has decreasing relevance, lower margins and one they already dominate.

          There’s simply no room for growth by concentrating solely on a PC OS and professional grade software anymore – for one thing the average PC price continues to drop, which means the % of the overall price that constitutes the Windows license goes up, which is obviously unsustainable, meaning Microsoft will increasingly have to lower their license fee to OEMs.

          For Microsoft to continue making money they have to get a foothold in emerging form factors like tablets, phones, “phablets”, etc. Previous attempts have generally been a disaster but by unifying the OS across different form factors and using their success on the tradtional PC to leverage development for touchscreen devices by pushing Metro might well help them achieve that. If they happen to disgruntle a few desktop diehards in the process then so be it, I doubt they’ll care.

            • blastdoor
            • 7 years ago

            There’s a difference between “growth” and “making money”.

            Microsoft isn’t going to grow like Apple today or like Microsoft of the 1990s. That period in their history is over, at least for now.

            There is nothing wrong with being a low-growth, but highly profitable, company. Look at IBM.

            Sure, it would be nice to experience the growth that Apple is experiencing, but wishing don’t make it so. It’s just flat out too late. When steve jobs returned to Apple he told everyone that the PC OS wars were over and Apple lost. He said “get over it”. He extracted what revenue he could from the stagnant Mac business and looked for new opportunities.

            MS is lucky to be in a far better financial position than Apple was back then. But MS needs to admit defeat in phones, tablets, and search, focus on making their profitable products the best they can be, and then be on the lookout for new opportunities.

            But I agree with you — no CEO lacking the name Steve Jobs can hold onto his job while pursuing that strategy.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<] admit defeat in phones, tablets, and search? [/quote<] leaving them the desktop, and no share in the platforms of the future? they'd essentially be running on borrowed time.

            • End User
            • 7 years ago

            Borrowed time indeed. Their phone business sucks, they have no tablets in the market today and their Online Services Division keeps losing tons of money (1.4B in the last quarter alone).

    • Madman
    • 7 years ago

    After using Win8 CP for some time, I have to disagree, the title should read “Microsoft to offer cheap Windows 8 downgrades to everyone”

    The Win8 core itself is amazing, I really felt the improvements, but Metro and missing start menu turns it from the best Windows ever, into something I rather avoid. Was it so hard to add “boot to desktop” by default and leave the start menu?

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 7 years ago

      While MS has always annoyed me for not making some of the more obvious options part of the default setup, it’s rare that you have zero control over something, in any way.

      Worst case scenario, they’re making Windows 8 a huge target for something like nLite/vLite.

        • FuturePastNow
        • 7 years ago

        I don’t have to screw with Windows 7 using mods and hacks. Why should I waste my time trying to make Win8 usable?

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          then stick with windows 7. lots of people stuck with windows xp

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 7 years ago

          Stop and think about what you just said. You apparently like Windows 7. Why does Windows 7 exist? Because the Vista launch was botched.

          What came after Windows Me? XP. See a pattern here?

          This isn’t the last Windows. The “mods and hacks” can lead to new features in the next version. Aren’t we on a PC enthusiast site here, where people play with “mods and hacks” as a pass time? It’s inevitable.

          What suddenly changed that takes this from a cyclical process to the apocalypse? The doomsayers are a bit unwarranted.

      • can-a-tuna
      • 7 years ago

      Start menu is shit. No need for that relic from the 20th century.

        • ludi
        • 7 years ago

        Yeah, throw out your grandmother’s cast iron skillet. Why keep something useful when it’s [i<]sooooo[/i<] old?

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          damn, you’re right! I’M GOING TO TOSS THAT CRAP RIGHT NOW!!! I’LL EVEN THROW IT AT HER!!! TEACH THAT OLD WOMAN TO GET WITH THE TIMES!

          • cegras
          • 7 years ago

          What a terrible analogy.

        • sschaem
        • 7 years ago

        The metro start screen belong only a fast food ordering station, not a worstation !

    • Krogoth
    • 7 years ago

    It is the only way for Windows 8 to get any adoption among the 7/Vista user base, since the only new thing it offers is the “App Store front + Start Screen” with minor updates on some of the build-in tools.

    Microsoft is hoping that they will make up the difference in the aforementioned app store.

    The current XP crowd consists mostly of businesses and people with hardware that is from the pre-Vista-7 era. Neither crowd has any interest in Windows 8. If businesses need to make an upgrade, they will opt for Windows 7.

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 7 years ago

      You could give it to me free and I still wouldn’t use it. Microsoft is subsidising the cost of the OS with the APP store. Windows 8 is basically copying the free to play gaming model. Cheap OS, but nickel and dime you for the apps. Screw that.

      Also, the only device that works well with Metro is the Surface, and that’s because it’s a tablet. PC’s don’t need a tablet GUI.

        • Beelzebubba9
        • 7 years ago

        Since when does Windows 8 force you to use the app store for anything?

          • sschaem
          • 7 years ago

          MS makes Metro the central part of windows8, so you cant escape it.

          What MS gamble that they need this strategy to kickstart the metro app store.
          Use Windows8, you will have to use Metro (And the app store is central to Metro as all the metro app are installed via the app store).

          I think right now its not so much for revenue but to force people to use Metro, if they want to or not.
          Like cattle MS is channeling people from the open pasture to a control environment where they get a cut on anything you spend online… Following in Apple footstep.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      i KNOW i ALWAYS complain when stuff is cheaper. I don’t buy menstrual pads, so KEEP THOSE BASTARDS EXPENSIVE TO SCREW THE PEOPLE THAT DO.

      • HighTech4US2
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]The current XP crowd consists mostly of businesses and people with hardware that is from the pre-Vista-7 era. Neither crowd has any interest in Windows 8.[/quote<] Well I am one of the XP crowd but am not a business or have hardware that is from the pre-Vista-7 era. I have a Dell Vostro 1500 that would have had Vista installed on it but I chose to downgrade the OS to XP because Vista was a piece of crap when it was first released. The laptop is Vista capable and I will be doing the cheap $40 upgrade to Window 8 Pro. The $40 price is a fantastic deal for us XP users.

        • l33t-g4m3r
        • 7 years ago

        Have fun using a bloated tablet GUI. You could have just bought a cheap copy of 7, or stayed with Vista since it wasn’t bad as reported. The usability problems with Vista’s increased security model are also included in 7 and 8. Anybody who rags on Vista, but loves 7 or 8 is a hypocrite. It’s the same underlying OS, aside from additions.

        Also, there is absolutely no point in upgrading Windows on an outdated laptop. Buy a new laptop instead.

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<] Vista was a piece of crap when it was first released. [/quote<] is this complicated to understand?

          • ludi
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<]Anybody who rags on Vista, but loves 7 or 8 is a hypocrite. It's the same underlying OS, aside from additions.[/quote<] Yes it is, but with some important distinctions: 1) When Vista was released, the drivers weren't ready. So people had problems. By the time Windows 7 came out, most of these had been dealt with. So people knew that Vista had problems, but Win7 did not. Obvious results follow for Win7's image and sales. 2) By default, UAC in Vista was hyper twitchy, giving people the impression that the computer was needlessly slowing down their workflow to ask trivial questions. UAC in Win7 was scaled back considerably, restoring the confidence that if UAC actually requested permission for something, it was important and deserved the extra attention. 3) Miscelllaneous UI cleanup -- for example, the kludgy and space-wasting Sidebar vanished from Win7, and gadgets could instead be pinned directly to the desktop. Microsoft could have made Windows 7 into a Vista service pack, but by that time they decided the Vista name was damaged goods. So they released Win7 as a new OS and got exactly what they wanted: dissociation from the Vista name while basically re-releasing the Vista code in a more polished and stable form. And everyone was happy, except possibly you -- I'm not sure I've [i<]ever[/i<] seen you happy.

        • sschaem
        • 7 years ago

        $40 is cheap but its a waste. Seriously, install free copy of windows8 before wasting your 40$…

    • Neutronbeam
    • 7 years ago

    For an additional $15 MSFT will ship you a DVD. The downloadable version can be burned as an ISO.

    If these prices get any cheaper they’ll start approaching Apple OS prices!

    And I just KNOW that this pricing will absolutely mean that all the enthusiasts here will go big for Metro! ;->

    “Metro: the tile is vile!”

    • drfish
    • 7 years ago

    Smart move.

      • Madman
      • 7 years ago

      Damage control…

        • nanoflower
        • 7 years ago

        True, but it is a smart move. The word was getting out about the downsides to Metro and the lack of a Start button which would have led to most people holding off on upgrading. This deal will lead to many more people upgrading early which will help Msft sell people on Win8 and may lead to more sales through their Win8 store.

          • sschaem
          • 7 years ago

          Whats the selling point for that 40$?
          So people know what they are loosing, their is value to it.

          How much value to pay that 40$ and loose that core functionality and be greated by some full screen crap?

          More info in the task manager? Not worth it…
          Faster boot time? going from 10 second to 5 seconds a few times a year.. not worth it

          ohhh. the metro app store full of touch based full screen app! Already got that via the Chrome web store.
          For the few that cares, you dont need the Metro app store to play angry bird…

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            losing*

    • Unknown-Error
    • 7 years ago

    Did hell just freeze over?

      • Jigar
      • 7 years ago

      Looks just like that…

        • Rand
        • 7 years ago

        No, the more people using Windows 8, the more people will hopefully use Metro. And Metro apps are pure profit for Microsoft.
        It only makes sense they would want to get as many people as possible to spend as much time as possible in Metro.

        Making money on the OS is purely ancillary, the real money is it the App Store. And if you’re using Metro all the time on your desktop/laptop they hope you’ll buy a Windows tablet and Phone so you can use it there too.

        Windows 7 lacks Metro, and anything outside of Metro is very little better then not using Windows at all from Microsoft’s point of view. They need as many people as possible using Windows 8 immediately far more then they need the extra revenue from OS licenses.

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