Microsoft confirms October release for Windows 8

Well, it’s official: Windows 8 will become commercially available in late October. Microsoft spilled the beans at its Worldwide Partner Conference in Toronto this morning, and the folks at AFP received further confirmation from Microsoft’s Communications Manager, Brandon LeBlanc:

LeBlanc said the company "confirmed that Windows 8 is on track to release to manufacturing (RTM) the first week of August" and "will reach general availability by the end of October."

Windows 8 will be following in the illustrious footsteps of Windows XP and Windows 7. The former hit stores on October 25, 2001, and the latter arrived on October 22, 2009. Windows Vista was released out of cycle, in late January ’07, but I think the October releases worked out better for Microsoft.

Some of us are already running Windows 8 right now, of course. The Release Preview has been out since May, and other pre-release builds came before it. We understand the Release Preview will remain usable until January 2013.

By then, chances are you’ll have had a chance to snag a discounted copy of the retail OS. Microsoft plans to allow XP, Vista, and Win7 users to upgrade to Windows 8 Pro for only $39.99, and it will charge even less—only $14.99—for upgrades from eligible Windows 7 PCs purchased since June 2 of this year. Considering the lukewarm response Windows 8 has gotten (thanks in no small part to its new Metro user interface), I expect the discounts will help Microsoft drum up much-needed enthusiasm ahead of the holiday shopping rush.

Comments closed
    • Shouefref
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]Microsoft plans to allow XP, Vista, and Win7 users to upgrade to Windows 8 Pro for only $39.99, [/quote<] Even XP? Whow! But what if my pc can't take it? What if my printer can't run with it? What if my programs won't run with it? XP -> Vista/7/8 is not a real upgrade, it's another system.

      • rrr
      • 7 years ago

      None of XP/Vista/7 to 8 is an upgrade really.

    • Anarchist
    • 7 years ago

    will W8 get a proper shutdown button before release?

      • Krogoth
      • 7 years ago

      It has a proper shutdown button. It is located in Start Window and right-side, pop-up panel.

        • sschaem
        • 7 years ago

        no, Its not a proper shutdown button.

        First you have to place your mouse in the hot spot and wait.
        If you dont wait and click, the spot is also use to minimize all windows, kind of a pain.
        Ok, when the pop open, you have to mouse the mouse up to activate the menu.
        then find a gear shaped icon (Its the first one and its HUGE) so easy to click on.
        This open a second side bar menu, this one does have text. and it include a sub menu popup with
        “sleep”, “shut down”, “restart”

        This is also the same dance you need to do to access the control panel and other feature that was once all nicely and quickly available under the start menu.

        This Metro UI design is completely F.U. Its great for a touch display, but absolutely counter productive for mouse/keyboard users. (I’m guessing desktop system are still driven by mouse+keyboard. because using a touchscreen on a desktop is beyond retarded).

        For all the geeks.. want a quick way to shutdown Windows8 ? click the desktop and atl-f4

        You will be greeted with a real shutdown option box.

        So here is comparing the ‘old school’ VS the Metro way of doing things:

        [url<]http://img839.imageshack.us/img839/8127/shutdownn.jpg[/url<]

          • Krogoth
          • 7 years ago

          You are just being obtuse.

          “OH NOES! THEY PUT THE SHUTDOWN BUTTON IN A DIFFERENT AREA!” I HATE CHANGE! ROAORAROROARR!” (/nerdrage)

          The quickest way to shutdown a system is still pressing the power button if you are so bloody impatient.

            • sschaem
            • 7 years ago

            Its not put in a different location. The issue is that Metro obfuscate and complicate the access to common features.

            What use to take two simple/quick click is now down through hot spot side bar menu 3 layer deep.

            I love change.. but for the better , not worse.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            No, it is in a different location. Also, the area for the charms bar is the TOP tight, not bottom. If you’re getting it there, they’re being forgiving

      • Madman
      • 7 years ago

      Alt+F4 on desktop.

        • Kaleid
        • 7 years ago

        That sucks.

    • TEAMSWITCHER
    • 7 years ago

    I would rather crumple two twenty dollar bills into a ball and light them on fire before buying Windows 8.

    Windows Vista has already proved that no matter how god-awful a Microsoft OS is, people will still be forced to buy it as PC makers have no other choices to bundle with their hardware. PC makers choose Windows, not users. With no real market forces acting on it Windows 8 can be a completely successful piece of shit. It’s the OS you would get in communist China.

    I’m not sticking with Windows 7, I already have OS X running on my PC as a Hackintosh. Steve Ballmer and his retarded legion of clueless idoits can go $%&^ themselves.

    • stupido
    • 7 years ago

    By the way, if I have 32bit Vista, can I upgrade to 64bit 8?

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      you can, but you’ll need a fresh install of 8. you can’t do a architecture upgrade.

        • stupido
        • 7 years ago

        I was hoping I can do fresh install, because as I understood, you can download installer that can create ISO image based on the installed OS…

        so to me was not clear whether it just checks for valid windows installation or it uses the installed OS to “patch” it… it is kind of obvious for the first case, but not so in the later…

        thus I can safely assume that I can upgrade from Vista 32bit to 8 64bit?

    • Malphas
    • 7 years ago

    ITT: Supposed “enthusiasts” whining about new UI like a bunch of pensioners that can’t deal with change.

      • Madman
      • 7 years ago

      Ok, describe me how you SHOULD work in heavily multitasked scenario in Win8 metro?

      Visual studio + WinDbg + Office + notes + calc + email client + internet browser + debuggable apps + IMs + console + few explorer windows now and then.

      Works like a charm in full screen Metro, I’m simply shocked how I could work for all of these years without it. Metro makes it just sooooo much easier.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        work in the desktop, same as you do now. none of that has changed.

          • Madman
          • 7 years ago

          Not about this topic, but on Win RT there is no desktop. Important to remember. Only +/- 1000$ tablets get the desktop.

            • djgandy
            • 7 years ago

            I’m sorry, who will be running WinDBG and Visual Studio on a WinRT tablet?

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            not quite true. there IS a desktop, but you can’t install stuff to it. Only Office runs there.

          • sschaem
          • 7 years ago

          How do you quickly access your recent documents, start you set of apps ?
          Press the windows key ? Your ENTIRE desktop vanish and is replace by a mac Donald Big mac ordering station. Big purple, green blue squares with broken text on multiple lines with no purpose of color or placement.

          Windows7, you get a non obtrusive menu that open and let you instantly see a well organize set of your most common used tools + all the functionality of the metro start screen minus the insane full screen flicker.

          I’m so.. but its not the same. Metro is junk. It also feel like some badly coded HTML app…

        • djgandy
        • 7 years ago

        I am currently writing drivers for Win8 using Win8, the only difference is the start menu is now a huge tile of applications which is easier to browse and navigate.

        I run all the applications you do with no problems at all. Ok I lied WinDBG has been banned from my Win 8 dev machine because with the far improved WDK integration with visual studio and easy setup of target machines for user and kernel debugging has super-seeded it. I don’t need the awful WinDBG UI anymore as I can debug drivers with ease from Visual Studio and have the joy of network kernel debugging that allows easy configuration and fast debugging of Virtual Box VM’s.

        As far as I can tell Microsoft did not remove any multi-tasking capabilities from Windows 8.

      • Duck
      • 7 years ago

      In this thread? You mean the thread you started?

      • ermo
      • 7 years ago

      I posit that not all enthusiasts are comfortable with rapid change and I suspect that enthusiasts are generally less sensitive to UI changes than non-enthusiasts.

      In that context, perhaps this quote from Mozilla developer Jono DiCarlo will serve to make you re-evaluate your point of view?

      [quote<]After years of aspiring to improve software usability, I've come to the extremely humbling realization that [i<]the single best thing most companies could do to improve usability is to stop changing the UI so often![/i<] Let it remain stable long enough for us to learn it and get good at it. There's no UI better than one you already know, and no UI worse than one you thought you knew but now have to relearn.[/quote<] Not that I'm against genuine UI and workflow improvements in Windows/Ubuntu/GNOME/KDE/Mac OS X/Chrome/Firefox etc., but experience has apparently taught DiCarlo that UI design is tied closely to the perceived functionality of what is an essential productivity tool for many people and organizations.

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      Although I think it is more than just a UI change. Microsoft seems to be betting on tablets eating up the computing market, which changes the face of computing overall. Windows 8 is their plan on compensating for that.

      Windows 8 might be doomed since it’s already being crucified, but I’m curious to see how things look in 3-4 years when we’re talking about Windows 9 and seeing how far tablets come in that time.

      • Krogoth
      • 7 years ago

      So true.

      My problem with Windows 8 is that it offers almost nothing compelling over Windows 7. The one thing that may win some users over is that Windows 8 has Hyper-V support if virtual machines are your thing.

      • Kaleid
      • 7 years ago

      Problem “x”

      – We need to change this!
      – This is something..
      – So let’s do it!

      • rrr
      • 7 years ago

      ITT: paid MS shills.

    • tootercomputer
    • 7 years ago

    So,what with all the grumbling I see here about win 8 and MS in general, it begs the question: with today’s hardware and the apps we use plus the peripherals, just what OS do people want to use, which do they prefer, for your daily use? For me right now, it’s win 7-64 bit, but based on my win 8 experience, I will shift to it upon its release. The 64-bit version.

    Tootercomputer

      • Chrispy_
      • 7 years ago

      I would like the interface and GUI of Windows2000 with the functionality, compatibility, and extensions that have made their way into Windows7 and Windows8.

      At the end of the day, the primary goal of an OS is to let you browse the system, and to run applications. Every release since 2000 has been getting worse at these core functions by muddying things, hiding the file system, and incrimentally phasing out obvious UI features with vague and useless ones.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 7 years ago

        I love Aero, I wish they had put more thought into the control panel though.

      • Anarchist
      • 7 years ago

      users should not adapt to OS but OS should adapt to users need. What that means is the OS should be configurable to run different window managers and desktops similar to how linux does things. Or at least that;s how I feel.

      • Madman
      • 7 years ago

      Actually Linux Mint 13 is what seems to be the best idea for me. Multiple desktops, super powerful console, integrated search and neat, compact interface. I do like cleanliness and crispness of Win7/8 desktop interfaces in some places though.

      • lilbuddhaman
      • 7 years ago

      The opposite of the ribbon interface.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      don’t sign your posts. it’s asking for people to hate you.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      don’t sign your posts. it’s asking for people to hate you.

    • Deanjo
    • 7 years ago

    Even @ $14.99, it is $14.99 overpriced.

    • pedro
    • 7 years ago

    6.25 years until I switch to a tablet.

    • Madman
    • 7 years ago

    Irrelevant news…

    If they would have left the start menu + boot to desktop, I would be waiting with anticipation.

      • Wirko
      • 7 years ago

      Starting with Windows 8, Start menu and Boot to desktop will be third party apps. I’m absolutely sure that there will be several very good ones, both free and paid.

      7’s Windows Explorer is hardly less horrible to me than 8’s Start screen but I can’t say that 7 is a bad OS because of that. I just checked out the alternatives to Explorer and picked one of them, like many people who find another web browser or media player.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 7 years ago

    I’m warming up to the idea of Windows 8. I’m not quite there yet, but by release I might be.

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    XP = 2001
    W7 = 2009

    Seven years, apparently. That’s how long it takes Microsoft to make a decent OS after the last one. I guess 2016 isn’t that long to wait. I could use 7 for a few years more without any hassle (though I wish they’d fix all the things they broke from XP).

    Discounts won’t do Jack, either. With Vista, people were PAYING to downgrade. Even when vista OEM was given away with HP/Dell machines, people were paying the small surcharge to get the downgrade to an XP license and the media to go with it.

      • McRuff
      • 7 years ago

      Actually it has been longer then that. The last decent operating system before Win 7 was Windows 2000.

      Windows 2000 could do anything Win XP could do.

      With XP they added the Win Me look. The constantly annoying Pop Ups that interrupted your work. The very hard to kill Windows Messenger. A absolutely horrible media player. The player was all form over function and was that bad, Media Player Classic was created and is going strong to this day.

      And don’t forget the other joy introduced with XP Windows activation.

        • Rand
        • 7 years ago

        Yeah, I was pretty underwhelmed with XP. There really wasn’t much there that made it anything special compared to Win2000. Some small changes, a more colourful UI. I upgraded but it was very much a a marginal change for me.

        I actually liked Vista quite a bit though, it definitely had some irritants early on that you had to work around but they were very much worth working around for all the positive changes.

        • BlackStar
        • 7 years ago

        Win2000 didn’t have mouse acceleration and cleartype. That’s reason enough for the existence of WinXP.

          • Duck
          • 7 years ago

          Mouse acceleration is work of the devil. Those who use it be sinners.

            • BlackStar
            • 7 years ago

            Try turning it off then and see how long it’ll take you to throw your expensive 2000dpi mouse out the window.

            • Duck
            • 7 years ago

            How did you know I had a 2000dpi mouse??? Are you a wizard? Anyway, I do have it off.

          • McRuff
          • 7 years ago

          Windows 2000 does have mouse acceleration. I don’t use it, but I fired up win2000 in Virtual box and it is there under mouse properties.

          So that leaves Clear type fonts as a trade off for Windows activation and all the other hassles.

          No wonder I never installed it on my Desktop Machine. I Kept Win2K going as long as I could until Microsoft cut off support and then downgraded to Vista

          I can see that happening all over again with Windows 8, the hassles are not worth the improvements over Windows 7

          • Krogoth
          • 7 years ago

          Windows 2000 doesn’t license its CPU count by number of sockets. It licenses its CPU count by the number of threads. SMT and multi-core chips didn’t exist in the x86 market when 2000 was being coded.

          In other words, 2000 Professional cannot fully utilize a quad-core chip or dual-core chip with HT and beyond. It only use two threads at most. You need to run 2000 Server in order to use four threads and 2000 Datacenter Edition to go beyond that (IIRC, it is limited to 16 threads).

      • Duck
      • 7 years ago

      Seven years, you said. Eight years the math said.

        • Chrispy_
        • 7 years ago

        Math is hard when you’re tired and drunk. I’m not apologising for my error, I was quite impressed that I managed to login, let alone whine about Microsoft.

      • rrr
      • 7 years ago

      7 is what Vista should have been from the start, they had an idea, but they rushed it too much. Go figure – 5 years gap still meant “rushing it out”.

    • marraco
    • 7 years ago

    Tell this to Microsoft:

    zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.

    …and I’m dreaming with start up menu.

    • Krogoth
    • 7 years ago

    and nothing of value was gained…..

    • MadManOriginal
    • 7 years ago

    $15 Win8 is tempting me to buy a laptop before the deadline even though I don’t truly need one. Since WHS is dead and I’m still using WHS v1 for drive extender, I could actually use the Win8 license on my home server with Storage Spaces aka new-fangled drive extender. (storage spaces overview: [url<]http://www.anandtech.com/show/5307/windows-8s-storage-spaces-detailed)[/url<] What's funny about storage spaces, at least in the detailed MS blog, is it appears to use desktop mode in Win8, heh. I imagine there will be a Metro-style interface but if not, funny. 🙂 Aha! I've seen through your dastardly plan MS :p Get me to buy a Win7 license AND a Win8 license,even if very cheaply.

    • Convert
    • 7 years ago

    I don’t like the new interface any more than the next critic, but honestly it’s not a big deal.

    Just don’t use it. There is nothing wrong with Windows 7, keep using it until the next iteration comes out and reevaluate then. Yes, the next version will probably have the same interface, but I’m rather confident they will refine it so that you can get more comfortable with it.

    I’ve lost track at how many times I thought the world was ending over some new feature in Windows that I hated, I either found a way to make it work or I waited till the next release and got used to it with the help of the improvements.

    Sometimes those much hated features turned into something I couldn’t live without once I understood how and why. I won’t go into all the things I hate about the loss of the Start Menu (I’ve been using Win8 for a while now), but I’m confident that if this version doesn’t win me over the next surely will.

      • blastdoor
      • 7 years ago

      A lot of truth here that applies to many OSes and software products (and even web site designs), not just Windows.

      I would also add that in addition to “refinements”, most companies are perfectly happy to back pedal if it turns out that users really, really hate something they’ve done. Companies that remain in business are companies that remain flexible and open-minded.

    • tcunning1
    • 7 years ago

    I.e., 3 1/2 months until I switch to a Mac.

      • jackbomb
      • 7 years ago

      But OS X also assumes that the average user is an idiot.
      Why not switch to Linux?

        • Grape Flavor
        • 7 years ago

        Well hell, why not switch to DOS, or punch cards? I’m sure there’s vocal legions of eager geeks who’ll try to convince you that those systems are perfectly usable, too.

      • tbone8ty
      • 7 years ago

      in 3 1/2 months you’ll be installing bootcamp on yur overpriced mac so you can run win8 lol

      • LocalCitizen
      • 7 years ago

      3 1/2 months until i switch to linux (ubuntu? mint? i got time to decide)
      ironic thing is, linux can be configured to look more similar to windows than Win8 metro

      edit: oh, and ask Dell, HP, whoever the hw maker is, for a refund on the bundled win8.

      • CuttinHobo
      • 7 years ago

      3 1/2 months until my computer’s OS remains unchanged.

      You act as if the previous version of Windows will refuse to run on the day its “successor” is released. 😛

        • tcunning1
        • 7 years ago

        Of course realistically this is what will actually happen; heck, I was still using Vista one computer until last year, and have XP running on many older ones. The MacOS certainly assumes its users are idiots (I actually had to Google how to find the Terminal, lol), but I somehow feel they are honest about it, and have less of a sense of betrayal.

        Since I have been building and fixing others’ computers for 20 years, I can confidently say that many, many Windows users ARE idiots when it comes to the most basic aspects of using their computers properly. How much does corporate America spend on training on the most basic of computer tasks? How will Win8 be anything but a nightmare for them?

          • blastdoor
          • 7 years ago

          I don’t mean to overly nitpick your word choice, but I don’t think “idiots” is really the right term here. While there are undoubtedly quite a few people from the left tail of the IQ distribution using computers these days, I think there are also plenty of people from the middle part and upper part of the IQ distribution who simply do not know or care about many of the more technical aspects of their computers. It is probably more accurate to describe them as “ignorant” — possibly even “willfully ignorant” — than as “idiots.”

          And I think there’s quite a lot to be said for the idea that people *should* be able to be ignorant of the more technical aspects of their computers these days. Just as people do not need to know how to rebuild an engine (or even change the oil) in order to drive a car, so to should most people not need to deal with the more technical aspects of a computer.

          And really, even for people who do have the technical knowledge necessary to handle the complexities of a computer, many may simply no longer wish to do so. I stopped building PCs and switched to using Macs not because I had some sudden loss of knowledge about how to build PCs — I just stopped thinking that building PCs was fun. I decided that ceding some control over my computer to Apple in return for less effort on my part in setting up and maintaining my computer was a good tradeoff for me at this point in my life. I made that switch in 2006 and for the most part am very happy with it.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            You could have bought pre-built Windows PCs instead if simply building them didn’t interest you.

            • tcunning1
            • 7 years ago

            All points well taken. No, computers should not be hard to use or only for experts. Windows is still too easy to cripple with viruses, crapware, etc.; after years of troubleshooting computers for other people, increasingly I’m telling them they should get a Mac, simply because it’s harder to screw them up in a fatal way. (Another poor choice of words; I wonder how many Windows PCs are literally thrown away simply because of viruses, software and configuration problems, etc. Lots, because I often find them on the curb.) I think that Windows 7 is fantastic–superior to the MacOS in actually getting work done efficiently, in my opinion. That’s why I’m so sad about this paradigm shift. At least the Mac still adheres to the desktop model and works the way I think a computer should, not a phone. Apple still understands this (at least for now), and I find it very hard to believe that Microsoft has forgotten it.

          • Corrado
          • 7 years ago

          You had to google how to type the word ‘Terminal’ into the spotlight and hit the enter key? I don’t think I’d want you fixing anyone’s computer.

      • Meadows
      • 7 years ago

      Why, is there a time bomb attached to your current PC?

    • lilbuddhaman
    • 7 years ago

    So, is there any “hack” for Win8 that removes the Metro interface entirely? (or is it too soon / impossible)

    edit: a quick google finds some registry hacks and a way to completely remove it, but at the cost of some core functionality being lost.

      • Krogoth
      • 7 years ago

      You realize that Metro is mostly just “Start Screen + app store front-end?” and you can still use the classical desktop and recreate most of the classical icons and shortcuts (“My Computer, My Documents)?

      You basically end-up having “Windows 7 SP2″……

        • cphite
        • 7 years ago

        I have no use for a full-screen start menu on my desktop; especially when I have to either scroll through multiple pages to find what I want, or search for it; and lose all ability to organize it the way that I want it to be organized.

        I have even less use for the app store front end aspect of it. The whole reason why smartphone apps exist is that, on a smartphone you have a small screen and have to rely on touch. So people create apps that are designed for that environment – larger text and buttons in proportion to the screen, simplified interface, etc. Those things make sense on a smartphone or tablet; they’re pointless on a desktop or laptop [b<]because the limitations they are intended to address don't exist on the desktop or laptop.[/b<] But with Metro you're stuck with that... and if you need to open two of the same kind of document side by side, too bad. If you need more than the allowed number of things open at the same time, too bad. Microsoft has decided that your PC needs to work like a smartphone. I have no use for Metro. It's as simple as that. There is literally nothing about it that improves my ability to do what I want to do with my PC. Nothing. Having tried it out, I can honestly say it offers nothing for me. Adds nothing to the experience. Quite the opposite, it limits me. Limits my ability to multitask. Limits my ability to customize. Adds pointless steps to nearly every action I need to perform. If it were an optional add-on to Windows 7 SP2 that'd be fine. But it's not. You can't disable it without farking up your entire OS. You can't even bypass it; indeed, when people have found ways to bypass it, MS has gone out of their way to prevent those things. So no, thank you - I will not be paying Microsoft to downgrade my operating system.

          • Krogoth
          • 7 years ago

          Windows 8 was never meant for traditional PC desktop market from day 1. Windows 8 is just Microsoft’s “panic attack” response to Android and iOS.

          This all started when tablets and portables begin to eat away at traditional desktop PC market. Average joe and rest of his buddies aren’t getting desktop PCs. They are getting tablets and portable systems. The only major consumer of traditional desktop PC market are enterprise and SMB segments, however they are in the process of undergo the XP => 7 migration. They have zero interest to do another upgrade. Windows 8 gives even less of a reason, since it offers nothing compelling to the tablet over 7 (App store is a big no for enterprise/SMB demograph) Microsoft shareholders see that Apple is making a killing on their portables and smartphone division and they want a piece of the action. Windows 8 is the result of this.

            • cphite
            • 7 years ago

            Then they shouldn’t be [b<]selling[/b<] it as a traditional desktop operating system. But that's exactly what they are doing. The attitude seems to be "Yeah, we know it's crap on your desktop but it works great on the tablet and that's where the money is. So just shut up and learn to use your desktop like a tablet because we're not interested in you if you're anything other than a content consumer."

            • Krogoth
            • 7 years ago

            No, Microsoft is being marketed to the current mainstream crowd who are getting portables and tablets. They are not interested in getting new desktop towers.

            The traditional desktop crowd is a dying breed and its userbase has become a vanishingly small, but vocal minority.

      • Frith
      • 7 years ago

      In the Developer Preview there were three ways to disable Metro, but all three were removed in the Consumer Preview.

      I assume the registry value you found is RPEnabled? If so, that only worked in the Developer Preview and, as far as I know, there’s no way to disable Metro in the Consumer Preview or Release Preview.

      Microsoft know people don’t want Metro so they’ve done everything possible to make sure it can’t be disabled. It’s a pretty ridiculous situation, but this is what happens when a company has a monopoly and doesn’t have to care about giving customers what they want.

        • Chrispy_
        • 7 years ago

        Metro is their [b<]ADVERTISING PLATFORM[/b<]. Bing was a massive flop, so they're shoving their unwanted crap in our faces with Metro instead. Allowing you to disable Metro is like an ad-sponsored website to endorsing Adblock or Noscript. NO THANK YOU STEVE. I'm not buying into your interface that tries to sell me new content every time I want to navigate to my purchased content. I am perfectly capable of buying my new content in a less annoying/restrictive/DRM-locked/cheaper/cross-platform way than the one you are pedalling.

          • Madman
          • 7 years ago

          Sounds like a rant and stuff, but this is truth…

          No cloud on my lawn!

          • Krogoth
          • 7 years ago

          Metro isn’t a ad platform. It is just another app store front-end. It is MS’s latest attempt to copy Android and Apple Store.

          • Corrado
          • 7 years ago

          [url<]http://blog.compete.com/2012/05/14/april-2012-us-search-market-share-report-bing-up-google-up-yahoo-down/[/url<] Massive flops don't have 1/3 of the search market.

            • Voldenuit
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]Massive flops don't have 1/3 of the search market.[/quote<] Bing is a massive flop because it cost MS $6.2Billion. Not to mention that there are other stats that refute your claim. Netmarketshare reports [url=http://marketshare.hitslink.com/search-engine-market-share.aspx?qprid=4<]4% global market share for Bing in June of 2012[/url<], and karmasnack reports [url=http://www.karmasnack.com/about/search-engine-market-share/<]4% global and 6% US market share in July 2012[/url<]. And that's not considering that ad revenue does not scale linearly with market share - if you only have 4% of the market, no advertisers are going to bother to pay to advertise on your service. Bing is a giant black hole for MS. Until they reach critical mass, they will not get ad revenue commensurate with their market share, and will continue to keep losing money.

            • Chrispy_
            • 7 years ago

            Thanks for providing links, saved me the effort.

            Any market share Bing has can be widely attested to the backhanded tactics of setting it to your default search engine/homepage any time you forget to untick the dialog box during one of the upteen gazillion Microsoft updates or utilities installations.

            I am still recoiling in disgust at how the Bing Desktop Bar is a centre-stage-hogging “windows update”
            For a start, it has nothing to do with the OS. Optional update or not.

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 7 years ago

            You have to count Yahoo + Bing together.

            • Voldenuit
            • 7 years ago

            Yahoo + Bing on the stats I linked still only make it to 10-12% market share. Yahoo seems to be bleeding more customers to google than they are transitioning to Bing anyway, so you could probably say that every yahoo customer is a potential loss to google rather than a potential gain for Bing.

          • ermo
          • 7 years ago

          Pedalling? Did you mean peddling?

          Between you and me, I don’t think MS is going to deliver shrinkwrapped apps via bicycle courier every time someone makes a Windows App Store purchase…?

          Other than that, by the time 2014 rolls around, we’ll likely all have grown used to Windows 8 and all the wailing and gnashing of teeth will be but a distant memory.

      • Rand
      • 7 years ago

      Parts of the Desktop UI have been completely removed entirely and replaced with a Metro WinRT equivalent, so I wouldn’t recommend disabling Metro. Even if it is possible you will be crippling and removing some pretty essential if seldom used functionality.

      Even something like opening files with non default applications won’t be possible anymore on the desktop if you killed Metro as that’s hooked through a WinRT Metro UI.

      Disabling the Metro would be disabling far too much of the desktop as well at this point. Their getting very closely integrated in release preview and I’d be surprised if it isn’t more tightly entwined by RTM.

      It’s nothing at all like it was in the developer preview with Metro essentially grafted on top, Metro, the UI and WinRT is used heavily throughout the desktop. Break one, and you’re breaking the other.

      Much as I hate Metro, it’s clear that Windows 8 without it is half functional at best on the desktop.

    • cphite
    • 7 years ago

    Honestly, I wouldn’t install this thing if [b<]they[/b<] paid [b<]me[/b<] $40. The interface is ugly and inefficient. Almost everything you do requires additional steps, often consisting of completely non-intuitive steps. It's basically a touch-screen interface with keyboard and mouse support provided as an afterthought. And what do you gain from all that? The ability to run full-screen smartphone apps on your PC, and it boots a little faster. Sorry, but not much of a trade.

    • Scrotos
    • 7 years ago

    Just as long as we can still get Win7 on our HPs we order in.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      Enterprise is potentially the biggest fallout from Win8. Company I work for was getting new PCs and using XP Pro as the OS as recently as May. (Yes, the IT department is quite slow in validating a new OS, but we can’t be the only one.) Will MS still allow ‘new’ XP licenses (undoubtedly it’s some kind of group license imaged onto the PCs but still…) for cases like this, or at least new Win7 licenses?

      I can’t see enterprises moving over to Metro, the desktop paradigm is too entrenched and honestly too good for getting actual work done. I know there is desktop mode in Win8 but it isn’t quite the same.

    • Tristan
    • 7 years ago

    When Start button will reach RTM ?

      • Wirko
      • 7 years ago

      It has already reached BSOD, the Bit Shredder Of Death.

      • Krogoth
      • 7 years ago

      Start Menu never went “away”.

      It just turned into a “Start Screen” with an app store front-end slapped on.

      I still cannot believe that people are too dense to realize it.

      The reason why Microsoft is trying to kill the old Start Menu is simple. They want average joe to get hook onto “app store” where MS will make steady income by being the middleman for countless library of “apps” a.k.a copying Android and Apple Store.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        nobody is too dense to realize anything. he just wants to be able to click an orb.

          • Krogoth
          • 7 years ago

          You click on lower-right corner to access the Start Screen on the desktop window.

          I honestly don’t see the big deal, unless you don’t want the Start Menu to occupy your whole screen.

    • sircharles32
    • 7 years ago

    Sorry, but I’ve already purchased my OEM copy of Windows 7 Home Premium (64-bit of course), for my next build. Supported until 2020 – check.

      • FuturePastNow
      • 7 years ago

      I probably won’t be building a new PC before October, but I’ll definitely be buying a copy of Win7 before then. In fact, I’ll probably buy a 3 or 5 pack. Those licenses will be good as gold once only Win8 is available.

    • tootercomputer
    • 7 years ago

    I’m wondering if the upgrade price is only for direct upgrades, or whether it will be a distinct download of the OS ISO to which one could then burn to a disk. If the latter, that would be one helluva price.

    I’m running the latest Win 8 preview on a 4 year-old C2D laptop, on a 120G SSD, and it just flies, really fast. A lot of that is the SSD, to be sure, but starting and closing Win 8 is very fast, and all in all it runs extremely well. Subjectively, it seems to run faster than Win 7. Win 8 and the SSD certainly breathed new life into an old laptop.

      • Corrado
      • 7 years ago

      They’ve said multiple times “It will be available in ISO format, and you’ll be able to do a clean install at the time of install (format)”

      As an aside, how has compatibility been for you? Everything seem to be working properly for you?

        • tootercomputer
        • 7 years ago

        Thanks for the ISO info. With that, I would definitely purchase Win 8 Pro for that price, it’s a no-brainer.

        Everything works:
        a. Office 2007
        b. Camera Software
        c. Wireless and LAN
        d. remote desktop (crucial for my job)
        e. The Mushkin enhanced Chronos 120SSD
        f. At home, it recognizes our wireless network printer, an HP, and prints just fine.

        I’ve kept this system fairly lean as I use it exclusively for work, and the hardware is pretty much what is on the laptop. An old Gateway laptop, purchased in 2008.

        It works great. I set all this up with no expectations whatsoever, given the age of the laptop and the fact that Win 8 is still in an RC stage, and have been totally pleased by the results.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 7 years ago

          In some cases, particularly with heavily threaded apps, Windows 8 is a nice performance boost, too. Cakewalk’s blog went into great detail with a Core i7 system running Windows 7 and then Windows 8 and seeing how the same build of Sonar X1 performs. In lots of scenarios, it performed much better.

          [url<]http://blog.cakewalk.com/windows-8-a-benchmark-for-music-production-applications/[/url<] Could be good news for people that work with heavily threaded apps a lot.

    • jackbomb
    • 7 years ago

    Hell yeah!

    Not really.

    • Ryhadar
    • 7 years ago

    I’m seriously thinking about picking up an upgrade copy of Windows 8 Pro for that price, especially considering the free WMC, for my HTPC.

    Metro doesn’t jive with me on my desktop or laptop, but on my TV it would be a welcome addition.

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      From what I can tell, Windows8 will ship with the same build version of WMC as 7.
      I also haven’t notice any improvement to WMP.

      Overall used for a HTPC windows8 shouldn’t be worse then 7,
      and could turn out to be better if developer start to write remote control friendly Metro apps.
      (MCE apps extension are lame)
      But the market might be so small that this might never happen, and you will need to go by a touch screen TV to run those app correctly 🙂

      • mcnabney
      • 7 years ago

      I thought that WMC was a PAID FOR add-on to Win8pro?

      Also, why not just set your HTPC to boot to XBMC right now?

        • Ryhadar
        • 7 years ago

        The limited upgrade comes with wmc for free.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This