Ballmer: We won’t let Apple out-innovate us

By announcing a Windows 8 tablet of its own design, Microsoft has made quite clear its intent to go toe-to-toe with Apple. Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer echoed that position in a recent interview with CRN. While he conceded that Microsoft and its partners have previously "ceded some of the boundary between hardware and software innovation [to Apple]," he said the software giant doesn’t plan to play catch-up anymore:

“We have our advantages in productivity,” he said. “We have our advantages in terms of enterprise management, manageability. We have got our advantages in terms of when you plug into server infrastructure in the enterprise.
"But we are not going to let any piece of this [go uncontested to Apple]," shouted Ballmer. "Not the consumer cloud. Not hardware software innovation. We are not leaving any of that to Apple by itself. Not going to happen. Not on our watch.

Yes, Ballmer apparently "shouted" that last response. No chairs were thrown during the interview, but CRN describes the CEO’s tone as "exuberant." I think he meant business, folks.

Oh, and here’s another interesting tidbit. When asked to comment on recent rumors about a Surface smartphone, Ballmer noted that Microsoft is currently hard at work on the Surface tablet, but he added, "Look, we’ll see what happens." Considering the amount of polish that seems to have gone into the Surface tablet hardware, I’d be interested to see what a Surface phone would look like.

Comments closed
    • Shouefref
    • 7 years ago

    Just noticed: Ballmer is shouting a lot about Apple, but what about… Google? Doesn’t that count anymore? Or is he just shouting out loud about Apple so that we would forget about Google and our attention would be drawn to the one company which is not an actual competitor of MS, because they’re in a slightly different market, that is: too up-market for most MS users?
    And in the same way he makes us forget about Ubuntu and other Linux distributions. Which might not be a real competitor ( I agree ), but then again, he makes sure we forget about them by shouting ‘Apple’ out loud.
    And doesn’t he forget about RIM? It’s still out there.

    • Shouefref
    • 7 years ago

    Just noticed: Ballmer is shouting a lot about Apple, but what about… Google? Doesn’t that count anymore? Or is he just shouting out loud about Apple so that we would forget about Google and our attention would be drawn to the one company which is not an actual competitor of MS, because they’re in a slightly different market, that is: too up-market for most MS users?
    And in the same way he makes us forget about Ubuntu and other Linux distributions. Which might not be a real competitor ( I agree ), but then again, he makes sure we forget about them by shouting ‘Apple’ out loud.
    And doesn’t he forget about RIM? It’s still out there.

    • d0g_p00p
    • 7 years ago

    developers,developers,developers,developers,developers,developers,developers,developers.

    • Knee Dragger
    • 7 years ago

    My cat’s breath smells like cat food…

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      Sharing isn’t always caring

    • moose17145
    • 7 years ago

    [url<]http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m6080yG3Dw1r2z27ho1_1280.jpg[/url<] need I really say more...

    • dpaus
    • 7 years ago

    [BallmerSHOUTING] WE WON’T LET APPLE OUT-INNOVATE US!!!! [/BallmerSHOUTING]

    I don’t know if it’s the ignorance or the arrogance that is more breath-taking.

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      The size of his balls, maybe?

        • dpaus
        • 7 years ago

        I’ll let you, um, handle that question.

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          I BEAT YOU TO IT TIFF!

          • Arclight
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<]I'll let you, um, fondle that question.[/quote<] Fixed

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            I shouldn’t have opened that can of worms…

      • Shouefref
      • 7 years ago

      I’ve often seen Ballmer trying to be popular like Apple & Steve.
      It never works.
      He’s like a pensioner trying to look like a pop idol.

    • gmskking
    • 7 years ago

    Ballmer: We won’t let Apple out-innovate us

    Too late

    • Shouefref
    • 7 years ago

    Actualloy I’m more afraid of Facebook grabbing internet than of Apple doing that.
    Apple isn’t big enough to really do that, but FB is.
    FB grew so fast that I think they got government support, or something along those lines. Not necessarily at the top levels, but at some local levels.
    People tend to forget that companies like Google, FB, eBay etc. need lot of real estate. The power consumption of Google seems to be quite big. It’s not just a matter of buying a store house and putting some computers in it.
    Fact is that the scale of those operations is underestimated, especially by the general public, as they only see very small parts of it. You never see what you don’t use with those services.

    • rrr
    • 7 years ago

    Newsflash: neither of these companies actually innovates.

    • Tristan
    • 7 years ago

    Ballmer nervous talk, is clear indication that they are behind Apple. They biggest weapon – Metro – is dumb, primitive and anti – intuitive. War in tablet space is over, and they fall like with Windows Phone.

      • Shouefref
      • 7 years ago

      They’re panicking.

    • ludi
    • 7 years ago

    Technically, he’s right: Microsoft won’t [i<]let[/i<] Apple out-innovate them. But seeing as Apple neither needs Microsoft's permission nor gives two figs about requesting it...

    • Arclight
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]Ballmer: We won't let Apple out-innovate us[/quote<] So i guess it's "Developers develop" time

      • Duck
      • 7 years ago

      Developers! Developers! Developers! Developers! Developers! Developers! Developers! Developers! Developers! Developers! Developers! Developers! Developers! Developers! Developers! Developers!

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        There’s been more downloads of our app from Windows Phone app store in a week than there’s been from Amazon app store in six months. Crazy!

        Maybe Windows Phone has a chance after all..

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          What app? Let me have a look!

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            Cabals:The Card Game:
            [url<]http://www.windowsphone.com/en-US/apps/4e6e2dbb-fcac-4b07-b27c-409351f8b992[/url<] Don't worry about the 3* - the account creation issues are fixed now

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            don’t worry. i would dl it with 1 star! that’s how much i love you, tiff!

            you work for Kyy games? crazy fins! the other game you guys have on there looks nuts! the translation to english is a little dodgy, but i’ll dl it anyway!

            i seem to suck at cabal…. haven’t won yet… part of it is i have no idea what’s going on…

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            Check out “How To Play” tutorial under the “Play” menu, or the website (www.cabalsgame.com). The tutorial will get better, though, I promise you…

            The game is platform agnostic, but I prefer playing it on Android over iOS (with ‘back’ button and all)… I haven’t tried WP yet, though

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            well, get yourself a windows 8 phone, and then you can see how nice it is!

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            I just might; I’m up for an upgrade in October.. Do they have x86 in them?

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            Not sure if Intel will be in any

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            you must have a lot of people playing it, because it takes about 2 seconds to find somebody to play with…. now that i read the tutorial, it makes more sense.

            I reviewed it for you, though I think the reviews are by location, so it’ll only impact canada…

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            Much appreciated, thanks! <3

          • Madman
          • 7 years ago

          2 vs 1?

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 7 years ago

          Is the part where I make a joke about WP7 users buying anything available because they’re so starved for apps? 🙂

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            over 100,000 apps is hardly starved. when iOS had 100,000 apps it was the most amazing thing! i realize it’s behind the competition, but when apple reached 100k it was “remarkable” and “staggering”, according to mashable anyway. when wp7 does it, we’re starved? i realize you’re joking, but you know i have nothing better to do than sit here in my underwear eating german chocolate cake, and type to you. My sweet bobbin.

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 7 years ago

            🙂

            • sschaem
            • 7 years ago

            Do you have other stats ?

            I think Apple got 25 billion download across 550,000 apps
            And Google 10 billion download on 400,00 apps

            The issue developers are facing releasing an app now is unless its freaking amazing , its lost.
            Also that you spend a weekend developing a gimmick: or spent 3 years and 6 people work on the app to make it stand out, MS, Apple, etc.. take 30% of your revenue before any of your dev cost.

            So as time goes margin for developer will get smaller and smaller as the dev cost skyrocket.
            Something will have to change or this will limit the ongoing quality of development.

            Also MS charge 30% and in return they allow you to offer your software to a number of user over 10 time small then Apple.
            So for a developer it make sense to invest in native iOS.

            Anyways. I dont have much hope with Windows mobile with Google and Apple being years ahead.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            You’re right that the app store is used less, and you’re also right that more software means more competition. I don’t really agree that less competition is better, as it allows crappier apps to do better. I prefer superior software, and i don’t think i’m alone.

            I’m not sure why the costs will skyrocket, as the developer tools are getting better and better. Most of the apps I use are made by extremely small teams, often 1 guy, that takes the time and effort to turn out an excellent app.

            As for the 10 times smaller, at this point, you’re correct. apple has a larger market base. But the ease of porting between windows 8 and windows phone 8 will be an attractive proposition for a great many people, and it’ll help with that concern.

            I don’t disagree iOS is an attractive market for developers. I just don’t think 100,000 apps is “starved”

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            Agreed; it’s a royal pain to try to get noticed in a huge sea of other apps. It takes some serious marketing dollars.. or cheating (google ‘apple dream cortex’)

      • Krogoth
      • 7 years ago

      [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KMU0tzLwhbE[/url<]

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        The dude is pure comedy

    • Auril4
    • 7 years ago

    “Ballmer: We won’t let Apple out-innovate us”

    They already have.

    • sschaem
    • 7 years ago

    Hilarious! “We are not going to let Apple takes those markets…” you just did, for the past 3 years, you bunch of monkeys.

    Its a war cry to regain what never belonged to you (ms), you have no clue why Apple is successfu and thats why trying to be hip will fail.

    I woudn’t be surprised is someday I hear the Zune 3 came and went without me knowing… “It was so great, it had cloud services, video chat,an app store… ” .. “you mean like the iTouch from years ago ?”

    sigh, MS. 🙁

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      there is no such thing as an iTouch. you can’t even figure out apples products, not surprised if you missed zune.

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]there is no such thing as an iTouch[/quote<] ...yet

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 7 years ago

    Ballmer is one of those guys who thinks that if he yells something that it makes it more likely to happen. No, Ballmer. If you want to beat Apple, you’d have to start thinking. Y’know, like how ol’ Bill Gates did. Use the noodle in your noggin’? Except he’s a business guy. He was never a programmer. He doesn’t get computers, not really. He’s been working in the industry running one of the juggernauts and he doesn’t get them. I’m sorry.

    He’s created a culture where it’s assumed MS will always be somewhere people just DIE to work. Except they’d prefer to work at Google or Apple or Facebook now. Not MS. MS is IBM now. And it’s all thanks to one Steve Ballmer. See, he thinks he can just COPY Apple’s hardware, slap a Windows OS into it, and bam, insta-success!

    Except that won’t work. Hell, Metro was smeared all over Zune, Zune HD, AND Windows Phone 7. None of them got anywhere. There are devices built by MS in that list and devices NOT built by MS in there. It doesn’t matter. They can make all the devices in the world, they ain’t gonna beat Apple by out-Apple’ing Apple. It’s like they think it’s Apple’s aesthetic that is destroying them and they’ve missed the point. They’re reading a different book than Apple.

    MS needs to trim its product line down. They need to get rid of all the extraneous crap that is not working and just losing money. They need to have a laser focus on a few specific products they can truly do something with. They need to look at the market and make things people WANT, not what they rely on a monopoly to make you SETTLE for. And ferchrissake, Ballmer, get your own aesthetic.

    You should also put the fire into MS by firing all executives, Steve. Including yourself. Your current executives allow too much infighting. This is a fire sale; everyone must go. Then you start promoting your best and brightest programmers and designers to the top jobs. Get the guys who do the best work to lead the rest. Get rid of stupid schemes where you rank everyone as “winners” and losers.” No one should be duplicating anyone else’s work. Get everyone talking. Do a company-wide, “Let’s see where we are,” session where everyone starts hashing out what they’re doing, so there’s no more “Hey, your version of a ribbon looks like this, my version looks like that” or “I’m doing Kin, I like it better than your stupid Windows Phone 7, but you’re doing it too anyway” or “Let’s mash Metro and Windows together into Frankenstein, no one’ll notice we did it!” Get everything AND everyONE on the same page, working together, toward a single aesthetic and goal.

    Most of all, focus on rewarding success only. Trim some of the fat to pay the muscle more, perhaps even extravagantly. Get people thrilled to be at MS. Make the workers see the place as amazing and state of the art. Magically, you’ll find the products become amazing and state of the art, just like the people feel. And then strangely enough, the consumers will feel the same way. It worked for Apple and Google, it could work for you, but only if you change and leave the stuffy business-oriented thinking behind FOREVER.

    That brings me to the obvious point. Ballmer, I’m afraid we have to talk. It’s you. Not us. Find some new blood, someone who can get people interested in MS again, and step aside in a very public, very obvious way. Swallow your pride, accept you aren’t the man for this new MS, and wave goodbye to them as they sail away from you in a very deliberate, very highly publicized manner. You won’t get any credit for what happens with MS, whether good or bad, but in your heart you’ll know you did your part.

    And then your stock won’t be DESTINED to become worthless, either.

      • Shouefref
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]MS is IBM now. [/quote<] Funny, I have been thinking the same thing. Eg bloatware. That was IBM, but is now MS.

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      You sound like a pissed off MS software engineer who thinks software engineers would be the best managers/executives. Sorry – they’re not. They would get too excited about how cool and elegant a piece of code is without even thinking about how much monetary worth it would have in the market place.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        And you’re being narrow-minded by pigeon holing people into black/white extreme roles. The reality is, and there are plenty of examples, that engineers can also make good business leaders.

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          they can, but different types of people fill different roles. I’m not disagreeing with what you say, but personality types are real, and ofter nerds don’t make great bosses.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            … and we all know how much you hate nerds…

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          He said:

          [quote<]Then you start promoting your best and brightest programmers and designers to the top jobs.[/quote<] He implies that those who are best and brightest as [i<]programmers[/i<] are also the best managers/business leaders. I disagree - IMO, in most cases great engineers make for bad managers. The two roles require very different mindsets. I know good engineers who are also good managers/business folks, but they are exceptions to the rule. Blindly moving everyone who did "great work" to management is a recipe for a disaster. The way HDO framed his rant made him sound like a bitter MS software engineer who didn't get the promotion to management he thought he deserved. Engineers tend to be arrogant because they are smart, and often think whatever they did is the best thing in the world, missing the bigger picture.

            • yammerpickle2
            • 7 years ago

            I agree a manager and engineer are a bit of different skill set, but there are plenty of engineer’s who have strong skills in both. And I can tell you I know plenty of manager types who because they don’t understand what they are trying to manage can’t apply their skill set appropriately. Basically, if you can’t understand what you are trying to manage or the skills that the teams need to accomplish it you really can’t manage it no matter how good your manager skills are. Unless one of key skills is not having a gigantic ego that prevents you realizing that you really don’t know what you are managing and therefore you go into the trenches and ask questions and learn about what you are managing.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      [url<]http://www.thestar.com/business/article/1209826--microsoft-cool-again-aging-company-lures-young-grads-with-free-rock-shows-6-000-monthly-salary[/url<]

      • Ifalna
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]Ballmer is one of those guys who thinks that if he yells something that it makes it more likely to happen. No, Ballmer.[/quote<] That's what I told my dad back in the day. Well I tried to, but he was too stubborn to listen. 😀

    • Anarchist
    • 7 years ago

    perhaps the best innovation to come out of redmond is the mouse wheel. Apple, after maintaining for years their idiotic single button mouse, tried to out do microsoft with even more idiotic touch mouse which failed miserably. As far as mouse wheel goes no one can touch microsoft.

      • TEAMSWITCHER
      • 7 years ago

      Um…ok. Reallly? You do realize that was well over a decade ago? Apple went on to perfect the track pad, which is standard equipment on this century’s best selling computers…laptops. Oh…by the way, Microsoft just released a nice collection of touch mice. Copying Apple’s great innovations is smart business….copy their failures is kind of stupid.

    • burntham77
    • 7 years ago

    Apple is best at marketing and polish.

    • ShadowEyez
    • 7 years ago

    Saying they *will* not let Apple out-innovate them misses the fact that Apple *has* out-innovated them (though who knows what the future will bring). He then says this as they’re announcing Surface – essentially an iPad clone with a few twists.

    • brucethemoose
    • 7 years ago

    According to Ballmer, MS will ALWAYS be playing catch up.

    [quote<] Not the consumer cloud. Not hardware software innovation. We are not leaving any of that to Apple by itself. [/quote<] They're going for an aggressive push into Apple's business. In other words, they're obsessed with beating Apple. Think about that mindset for a second... Now think about Apple's mindset. I can already picture Apple employees saying "Microsoft Surface, what is that?" Bar patents, competition isn't even part of Apple's vocabulary, they simply throw alot of something out in the market, market it, and watch people gobble it up. They aren't worried about the latest HP Envy, Asus Transformer, or MS Surface tablet. They aren't competing, they're just trying to innovate (which they sometimes do, but sometimes don't) and sell lots of highly profitable products (which they always do). MS's CEO, on the other hand, seems blinded by an obsession with competition. If Microsoft sees itself as Apple's rival, and they aggressively try to invade whatever business Apple has their finger in, MS will ALWAYS be a step behind, no matter how good their product is. Ballmer's obsession with defeating Apple with "hardware software innovation" contradicts the very definition of innovation: going into something your competition doesn't have. The meaning of the word "innovation" has truly been forgotten.

      • jstern
      • 7 years ago

      Actually Apple has been suing a lot of their competitor almost obsessively for any little thing that they’ve done in so many different countries. It’s like you’re getting lost in a day dream that really excites you. Not a put down, that’s just how your post read.

        • brucethemoose
        • 7 years ago

        Hmm, true. I say the darndest things.

        I didn’t mean to call Apple innovative (recently they’ve been the opposite). I was just saying Ballmer’s obsession with “beating” Apple might stifle his own company’s innovation.

          • shank15217
          • 7 years ago

          oh u mean how the us was obsessed with beating russia to the moon so they couldnt out innovate them? Your logic fails. A competitive company is always a better company.

            • burntham77
            • 7 years ago

            Not necessarily.

            • brucethemoose
            • 7 years ago

            The moon race is a great metaphor, actually. Competition fueled the race to the moon.

            But once we got there… well, we haven’t been back have we? The sense of amazement was lost over the years. In the same way, people lose interest in new products once they aren’t original and cutting edge any more.

            An arms race between companies is good, but there’s a point where you have to branch out and start another race.

            • Madman
            • 7 years ago

            Yea, my friends already complain that their tablets are collecting the dust, and they are very happy they were given to them by their employers.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      That’s what I was thinking – it’s kind of too late in most current markets. They need to come up with something we don’t already have and fill a need we didn’t know we had.

        • brucethemoose
        • 7 years ago

        This was what I meant to say ^^^^

    • blastdoor
    • 7 years ago

    Ballmer is talking as if he was just hired as CEO yesterday. But he has been CEO of MS for most of Apple’s revival and disruption of Microsoft. Was he in a coma for the last 10 years? How did we arrive at this state of affairs? How is his chest-thumping today going to make the next 10 years any different?

    • Frith
    • 7 years ago

    Are Apple really that innovative? I think where Apple excels is not so much innovation, but in delivering products that work well and that consumers want to buy. Conversely, I think where Microsoft fails is that they come up with a product and try to force it on users whether they want it or not. Metro is a classic example of this, and instead of listening to users and making version of Windows 8 where Metro can be disabled Microsoft instead take the “you’re going to use it whether you like it or not” approach.

    If Microsoft continue to ignore user feedback, and continue to sell what they want to sell rather than what customers want to buy, they’ll continue to decline in relevance.

      • holophrastic
      • 7 years ago

      I think you’re forgetting that Microsoft, for the last two decades, has been forced to not deliver perfectly valid solutions because of a perceived monopoly on everything. The app store is the greatest example. Event just five years ago, had Microsoft openned an app store, they’d have been sued out of existence.

      Allowing Apple to have gotten to this point, (often on Microsoft infrestructure, by the way), now Microsoft will be permitted to do all of the things that you’d want out of them.

      When it comes to metro, you’re asking them to keep something that they wanted to phase out ten years ago, but had to keep for the reasons above.

      I agree that the start menu is complete garbage. Today’s start menu needs to be a full screen thing. Not to mention that the very act of hitting the start button isn’t a background thing. I’ve watched as every user from every technical level turns their head and focusses on the little itty bitty bottom left (or in my case the top right), dealing with the start menu’s 100 pixel wide interface.

      The point is that you never need to see your current application when picking a new one. It doesn’t help. So it needn’t be there.

      But it doesn’t matter. You’ll survive without a start button, no matter how good it is. It’s been around since 1995. So if you’re advocating for a twenty year-old interface, that’s one thing, but it won’t be difficult to get used to something else.

      I hope your entire computing comfort doesn’t come down to the start menu. I haven’t used it in two years — and I’m on vista. 7 already started to phase it out.

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]So if you're advocating for a twenty year-old interface, that's one thing, but it won't be difficult to get used to something else.[/quote<] They have used steering wheels on vehicles for over a 100 years. Just because something is old doesn't mean that it is out of date. Sure vehicle manufacturers could have started using levers, hand throttles, etc but somethings are just that good and of logical design that you don't mess with it.

        • Madman
        • 7 years ago

        Start menu full screen? WTH are you smoking? It’s painful to rescan the whole damn 24″+ screen just to find a small stupid option somewhere. The WHOLE screen has changed, you have 2+Mpix of NEW information!!!

        Every time metro fires up on the Full HD+ screen, it pisses me off to move my focus all around just to find one stupid option. Constant color flashing from desktop only makes it 100x worse.

        • heinsj24
        • 7 years ago

        Microsoft had an App Store 5 years ago called Digital Locker as part of thier Windows Marketplace. It was shuttered three years ago. Microsoft was not sued out of existance; they simply closed it to make people use their b&m stores.

      • cynan
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]Conversely, I think where Microsoft fails is that they come up with a product and try to force it on users whether they want it or not.[/quote<] How exactly does Apple not "come up with a product and... ...force it on their users" with almost every product launched? If you've bought a Mac and don't like some aspect of OS X , you're just as SOL as someone who buys a new PC next fall that comes with Win 8 who doesn't like metro. The difference to which you are referring, while partially having to do with innovation and integration, etc, is largely one of marketing. Apple has been very successful (probably more than any one company should be) at almost effortlessly (at least by appearance) convincing a large proportion of their target market that they need/want their products exactly how they are. Itunes, for example, is a horribly restrictive application. Apple adds and removes features on a whim (the most egregious example in recent memory being the removal of the ability for newer flash-based iPods to be used as flash storage devices for no apparent reason). In summary: MS forces a Windows feature (metro) down their customers' throats and many are up in arms (perhaps justifiably). Apple forces an entire mobile computing ecosystem down their customers throats (hardware specs, core software and all) and they are rewarded stupendously and people clamor for more. Interesting dichotomy that.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        They don’t; they just have a better idea of what people want than MS does right now.

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          I totally disagree. people WANT the same thing they’ve wanted for years. an easy way to torrent shows, and play facebook games. they’ve had that for YEARS. new purchases are need creation, not legitimate needs. That goes for almost any company, imo. Does it mean people shouldn’t buy it? that’s another question.

          • cynan
          • 7 years ago

          Sure, that’s part of it. The other huge chunk is that they are a lot better at telling people what they want than MS is.

          This has allowed them to create, almost top to bottom, a new consumer mobile computing market, or at least one directed at a much wider target audience. And kudos for that. It’s no small feat. What they are conveniently ignoring is that just because you (essentially) create a market, doesn’t mean you own it… but that’s another debate.

          • Firestarter
          • 7 years ago

          If you listen carefully, there are plenty people who are dissatisfied with their iThings because Apple apparently does not know what they (the people) want. So while Apple certainly appears to be better tuned into their customers wishes, there is still room for improvement, which is exactly the place where Google and Microsoft are trying to wiggle themselves into.

      • moog
      • 7 years ago

      I love Metro. Now that I’ve gotten used to it.

      The desktop tile is pinned so I touch/click once and I switch to desktop, going back to Metro is a swipe/hover and touch/click away.

      Win8 is awesome.

      As Jobs has shown, consumers don’t know what they want until they want it. Apple under Jobs ignored user feedback, they would only take Mossberg’s feedback under review.

      Microsoft is not the only one asserting their design on consumers.

      • Bensam123
      • 7 years ago

      I delivered multiple similar posts and fell well into the negatives. Well played sirs.

    • Tristan
    • 7 years ago

    Metro flood is latest innovation from MS. So, please, no more innovations.

    • anotherengineer
    • 7 years ago

    Out innovate or out patent?

    • ALiLPinkMonster
    • 7 years ago

    Not gonna lie, I’m pretty excited to see how the Surface compares to the iPad, especially the x86 version. We already know that Tegra 3 can’t keep up with the A5X, but an Ivy Bridge is a totally different story. Hopefully they don’t have to make it TOO much thicker than the ARM version.

      • Shouefref
      • 7 years ago

      Surface can give us the same sensational story HP did last year.

    • HighTech4US2
    • 7 years ago

    If the prices of the Surface RT tablet are sky high as the rumors have suggested then Ballmer can shout all he wants but it won’t make a difference as I won’t be buying.

    • Krogoth
    • 7 years ago

    Ballmer is right, at least he throws a chair when something doesn’t go as planned.

      • Krogoth
      • 7 years ago

      ITT: No fun zone!

    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    Funny how those advantages were already snuffed out with Metro. I don’t think Ballmer has used Win 8.

      • ALiLPinkMonster
      • 7 years ago

      I don’t think YOU have used Win8 on a tablet.

        • Ari Atari
        • 7 years ago

        I think we can agree windows 8 works well with a touch screen, but Bensam was probably talking about the desktop environment where it sucks without touch.

          • ALiLPinkMonster
          • 7 years ago

          Which is irrelevant since Ballmer is obviously talking about the Surface for the most part.

            • Ari Atari
            • 7 years ago

            Ya, but I just couldn’t help but repost my “I hate metro on the desktop” opinion.

            • internetsandman
            • 7 years ago

            A debate where all participants receive upvotes. This is a happy moment

            • [TR]
            • 7 years ago

            Actually, Ballmer is talking about how they have products for pretty much every job in the enterprise and how the Surface tablets will be integrated “seamlessly” in those environments.
            Except that not everyone or everything will be using W8 in a Surface tablet, so the desktop experience needs to be as good as the tablet’s. I don’t think people will be moving away from MS just because of W8 (most can wait if MS needs to correct course for W9) but Ballmer is trying to say W8 will not change anything for their enterprise market without evidence. In fact, if they require W8 upgrades for the tablet to be integrated, I predict they will fail to meet their expectations.

          • Bensam123
          • 7 years ago

          Yes…

        • Shouefref
        • 7 years ago

        And YOU are a fanboy.

        Back in the nineties I loved to have MS stuff. I was never quick with updating my OS, but that’s because I’m not a spendthrift. Nevertheless, in the end I usually upgraded.
        But nowadays I’m really afraid of having to upgrade.

          • Shouefref
          • 7 years ago

          I’ll explain what makes me afraid of upgrading nowadays.
          If I think of leaving XP and going to new stuff, I’m asking myself these questions:
          What if my pc can’t take it?
          What if my printer can’t run with it?
          What if my programs won’t run with it?
          XP -> Vista/7/8 is not a real upgrade, it’s another system.
          I didn’t have to ask those question in such a pertinent way when I went from W95 to W98 to WMe to WXP.

          • ALiLPinkMonster
          • 7 years ago

          I am in no way a fanboy. Hate how that term just gets thrown around these days. I hate metro on the desktop just like most people, but I also realize that Win7 isn’t going anywhere and MS isn’t going to murder my family if I don’t upgrade to Win8 on the desktop. That said, I am in the market for a new tablet and metro seems very promising as a tablet UI.

            • Duck
            • 7 years ago

            Anyone in these comments that uses the word “fanboy” should get an automatic 48 hour ban IMO.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            Is ‘fanboi’ ok…?

            • Duck
            • 7 years ago

            No.

        • Bensam123
        • 7 years ago

        Yes… I’m sure Metro is awesome on a Tablet. Just as the Mac tablet OS and Android are awesome on tablets too. Good for them.

        Metro extends beyond tablets though. Apple and MS both do.

          • Shouefref
          • 7 years ago

          I as a business user don’t care whether my toy (smartphone, tablet) runs the same OS as my business installation (desktop).

    • chuckula
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]We won't let Apple out-innovate us[/quote<] Frankly that might be true in a technical sense. For example, the Kinect is a far more technologically innovative device compared to its competitors than what Apple puts into the iPhone. The problem is that Apple has out-integrated, out-marketed, out-supply-chained, and out-shinied Microsoft... and that's why Apple is rolling in it.

      • Madman
      • 7 years ago

      Even technologically, it still feels that Microsoft is scrambling and doing a catch up.

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]For example, the Kinect is a far more technologically innovative device [/quote<] Hardly, hackers have been using webcams for pointer control for quite a few years before Kinect was brought out. The implementation of it being used on a gaming system may be new but the technology to do it has been around for a while and was implemented else where.

        • willmore
        • 7 years ago

        That’s not quite how the Kinect works, you know.

          • cynan
          • 7 years ago

          Yeah. Off the top of my head, I remember the Kinect working by projecting something like an infrared grid. A user’s body movement is then tracked by determining which of the “dots” on the grid become blocked. There must also be a depth component, probably something to do with how fast the IR light is reflected back to the camera, but I don’t remember exactly.

          • Deanjo
          • 7 years ago

          I know exactly how the kinnect works.

      • willmore
      • 7 years ago

      You forgot ‘out litigated’.

    • End User
    • 7 years ago

    The poetry of Steve Ballmer [url<]http://goo.gl/QjJMP[/url<]

      • uwsalt
      • 7 years ago

      That’s clever. Could use some more work and material, but there’s potential. Still, it will be hard to match the brilliance of the existential poetry of Donald H. Rumsfeld, particularly his best known work, “The Unknown”:

      As we know,
      There are known knowns.
      There are things we know we know.
      We also know
      There are known unknowns.
      That is to say
      We know there are some things
      We do not know.
      But there are also unknown unknowns,
      The ones we don’t know
      We don’t know.
      —Feb. 12, 2002, Department of Defense news briefing

      A collection of his works from that era has been published under the title “Pieces of Intelligence.” Well worth checking out:
      [url<]http://www.amazon.com/Pieces-Intelligence-Existential-Poetry-Rumsfeld/dp/0743255976[/url<]

    • Meadows
    • 7 years ago

    Isn’t a “Surface phone” the SAME EXACT THING as a Windows Phone 8 (or whatever they’ll call it)? Why would they come out with two renditions of the same thing?

    Also, yes, Ballmer is obnoxious.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      the question is one of hardware.

        • Meadows
        • 7 years ago

        Invalid question. Why reinvent a wheel that they’ve already reinvented before? They should continue with the WP branding and make the positive feedback waves taller.

        (Heck, even I’m considering a Lumia and I tried hard looking at *all* the smartphone options for a while now. The things just look good at what they do, despite the irritating commercials with the truly horrendous choice of music.)

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          The question is whether they’re going to make a ms branded phone that’s running WP 7/8. I’m sure keeping the waves high is part of that.

          The lumias are good phones, but with win phone 8 not coming to the existing ones, I probably wouldn’t buy one if you were worried about updates.

        • blastdoor
        • 7 years ago

        I thought Nokia had pretty good hardware??

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          They do, but no other oem does. Samsung makes crap WP stuff. HTC is a little better, but not great. Dell didn’t bother to support the venue. Its been failure all around

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