Report: AMD to reveal Jaguar details in August

Tablets are the hot new thing. Research firm IDC says over 100 million slates will sell this year, and that number is expected to almost double by 2016. Right now, the market is dominated by ARM-based SoCs. Intel has a new Clover Trail version of its Atom processor primed for Windows 8 tablets. What about AMD?

We learned in April that AMD is working on a tablet-focused APU dubbed Temash. In addition to graphics derived from the GCN architecture underpinning the Radeon HD 7000 series, Temash will feature dual processor cores based on a new Jaguar CPU microarchitecture. According to PC World, AMD will release more details about Jaguar at the Hot Chips conference next month. The new CPU design will power not only dual-core Temash chips for tablets, but also quad-core Kabini variants that will trickle into notebook territory currently occupied by AMD’s Brazos processors.

The first Jaguar-based products aren’t expected until 2013, so they’ll be late to the Windows 8 party. AMD does have something up its sleeve for the first wave of Metro-infused tablets, though. A tweaked version of AMD’s Ontario APU should be out before the end of the year. Dubbed Hondo, this ultra-low-power part could cut Ontario’s TDP in half, reducing the chip’s thermal envelope to just 4.5W. It will be interesting to see if Hondo can hang with Clover Trail. Both chips will be able to do something that ARM-based SoC’s can’t: run the full-fat version of Windows 8 and x86 applications. That capability should prove particularly useful for notebook/tablet hybrids.

Comments closed
    • Unknown-Error
    • 7 years ago

    Who will be at Hot Chips 2012? NeelyCam?
    IIRC there will be some info on ‘[b<]Steamroller[/b<]' core too?

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    So is Jaguar gonna be an evolution of Bobcat or will it be a totally new design? And all this hype wouldn’t mean much if it’s delayed, turns up to be not as impressive as we hoped it would be, and ends up in just a few cheap, low-end tablets from some unknown Chinese manufacturer.

      • mesyn191
      • 7 years ago

      Evolution. Its probably on the same process and so its probably just a tweaked Bobcat for even lower voltages and/or they cut down on the GPU side which would probably be overkill for a tablet.

      Realistically I’d expect it to be around a C-50 APU in terms of performance. So not very fast at all but enough to run your web browser, youtubes, office, and some flash games.

        • Unknown-Error
        • 7 years ago

        Is it an evolution? If so, how much of an evolution? I asking because, the cancelled ‘Wichita’ and ‘Krishna’ were to be ‘Enhanced Bobcat’ cores. Now there is jump from ‘Bobcat’ directly to ‘Jaguar’. If ‘Jaguar’ can provide only some teaks well then it is truly ‘bye bye AMD’.

          • mesyn191
          • 7 years ago

          Nah it just has to be as good or better than what Intel and the various ARM vendors are offering to keep them in the game.

          I’d like for them to hit one out of the park in at least one product sector but for whatever reason AMD has been doing a really shit job executing for the past few years.

    • provoko
    • 7 years ago

    WTF! How about a desktop CPU that beats Intel and then we can upgrade by dropping into the same motherboard!? That’s all anyone wants from AMD.

      • maxxcool
      • 7 years ago

      Until the fakish hyper threaded core is no longer sharing resources you will not see that any time soon.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 7 years ago

        How about a desktop chip that gets 90% of Intel’s speed for 75% of the price?

          • provoko
          • 7 years ago

          that sounds nice =)

      • A_Pickle
      • 7 years ago

      Easier said than done, much? AMD nets, like, $500 million a year. Intel nets $13 billion. That they are as competitive as they are is pretty astounding, in my opinion.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 7 years ago

    Summary of every AMD press release about CPUs for the last 5 years: “Our stuff will be awesome…in the future!”

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 7 years ago

      That’s every companies’ press releases.

        • HisDivineOrder
        • 7 years ago

        Noooooo. There’s Apple’s press releases (“We have to sue so and so because they are infringing on our obvious so and so patent/copyright.”) that are not that way. Or perhaps HP’s press releases (“We’re laying off a bunch more people. Also, we’re shutting down so and so division.”). Or RIM’s press releases (“Honest, we’re not in a death spiral. Stop asking me that! We’re not! In! A Death Spiral! We’re in a slow, uncontrolled descent into a chasm of doom! BUT IT IS NOT A DEATH SPIRAL!”) Or a Microsoft press release (“Metro is going to rock people’s worlds and make them love Zune/Zune HD/Windows Phone 7/Windows 8/Windows RT/Windows 8 Phone! No, we’re not worried that Zune/Zune HD/Windows Phone 7 failed before it because we’re going to do our best to remove all traces of said products so people won’t get confused or even remember that those products existed. Fortunately, no one bought those other products, so that won’t be hard to make happen.”)

        So you see. Not all companies use press releases for the idea that if you just wait a little while, that new stuff’ll be awesome. Some just use press releases to repeat the same garbage that’s more applicable to their specific idiosyncrasy.

        I will admit though that every time I’m reading something about AMD, it’s almost always talking about how “in the future” something’s going to be SOOOOO much better and that’s when everything’ll fall into place. Except it never does. Never. Not ever. Every single time, AMD is shown up by its competitors. The ATI/graphics card division does its best I guess, but I would hardly call the 79xx series at the launch/post-launch/post-cut #1 or #2 exorbitant prices really that conducive to them winning.

        And AMD can’t release a CPU without a qualifier these days to save their lives.

    • A_Pickle
    • 7 years ago

    Jaguar.

    That’s what I want. USB 3.0, dual-core x86 performance, Thunderbolt, and Radeon graphics on a tablet with an optional keyboard dock. 240+ GB of local storage would be icing on the cake.

      • Oberon
      • 7 years ago

      Ehhh, cramming 240GB of storage into a tablet would take some incredible engineering.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        Not really, there are mSATA SSDs with that capacity. [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820226321&Tpk=mSATA[/url<] Mounting those few components directly on the tablet motherboard wouldn't take too much space.

          • Oberon
          • 7 years ago

          Heh, I was looking for 1.8″ devices with that storage; didn’t even consider mSATA. Even that, though, wouldn’t really be desirable since it would add significantly to the thickness of the device (significant here being relative to the thicknesses possible without having the mSATA slot and card.) Even if you were to solder the components directly to the PCB, that’s a lot of real estate for a tablet.

            • A_Pickle
            • 7 years ago

            A few millimetres at worst. I’d gladly have 240+ GB at the expense of some millimetres.

    • BobbinThreadbare
    • 7 years ago

    For comparison’s sake what’s the TDP of current ARM chips like the Tegra 3 and the Snapdragon?

      • chuckula
      • 7 years ago

      A lot less (usually 1 – 1.5W when running flat-out and typically about 0.5 watt during regular use).

        • guardianl
        • 7 years ago

        Actually the tablet versions of Tegra 3 (1.3GHz +) can reach 4W TDP.

          • tviceman
          • 7 years ago

          I’d like to see where you got this 4w tdp information from.

            • Oberon
            • 7 years ago

            According to NVIDIA’s own numbers, T33 should consume somewhere around 2.5W with all four CPU cores under load and no load on the GPU (calculated from the power consumption stated in NVIDIA’s Tegra 3 white paper and scaling linearly with clockspeed), so 4W probably isn’t that far off.

            • torquer
            • 7 years ago

            Of course for typical applications this will almost never happen. Intel themselves have said that the typical smartphone/tablet app has a hard time making effective use of 2 cores, let alone 4, let alone all being maxed out. Perhaps in benchmarks but not much else. So, theoretical max power use is one thing, but real world is going to be much less. Plus, Tegra 3 has the added benefit of a specifically designed low power core for light duty/background tasks. Even Intel and AMD’s best can’t match the power efficiency of the best ARM CPUs (for now).

            • Oberon
            • 7 years ago

            The same holds true for x86 chips aimed at the same market segment. The question was about TDP, with the assumption being that the TDPs of ARM chips are significantly lower. This is clearly not always the case (though Tegra 3 isn’t exactly a shining example of ARM efficiency).

          • Meadows
          • 7 years ago

          God no, I’m never going to buy an egg baker like that.

      • nafhan
      • 7 years ago

      We really need to see some good battery life tests. TDP is helpful for planning cooling (i.e. handling the worst case scenario), but doesn’t always give you a great indication of what the power usage under typical workloads will be.

      That said… high TDP does often correspond to a higher average power usage as well.

    • dpaus
    • 7 years ago

    Any reliable rumours on the Clover Trail TDP yet? Or what graphics it will have?

      • DavidC1
      • 7 years ago

      The previous generation Oak Trail had a 3W TDP. I’m not sure whether it’ll be lower on Clover Trail. It may, as its on a 32nm process. The graphics is PowerVR variant, I’m not sure about that either. May be the same one used for the upcoming dual core Smartphone Atom, the Z2580 with PowerVR SGX544MP2 @ 533MHz.

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