Croteam to bring Serious Sam 3 to Steam on Linux

Well, this is encouraging news. Barely over a week after Valve’s announcement that both Steam and Left 4 Dead 2 are headed to Ubuntu Linux, another developer has jumped onboard and promised to release its game through the Linux version of Valve’s digital distribution service.

As Shacknews reports, that developer is none other than Croteam, and the game being ported is, of course, Serious Sam 3. In a strangely expletive-laden statement, publisher Devolver Digital revealed, "We’re in the process of integrating Steamworks and achievements and the whole shebang, but we can’t get the little [expletive] of a penguin to stand still." Croteam included the following screenshot of Serious Sam 3 running on Linux on its Facebook page, as well:

Serious Sam 3 will be hitting the Steam version of Linux later this year, according to Shacknews. For what it’s worth, Croteam is also cooking up a Linux version of Serious Sam 3 that isn’t tied to Steam.

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    • sschaem
    • 7 years ago

    Times are changing…

    After all the bad stuff I said about Linux over the years , I hope they wont hold a grudge ๐Ÿ™‚

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 7 years ago

    Hopefully, this gets the ball rolling across a lot of the big-yet-semi-small guys that could really get people on board with Linux gaming. A top tier publisher porting to Linux would seal the deal.

    I think MS has finally created the scenario where the developers of PC games are shaking their head and going, “Maybe I ought to get on that Linux port after all…”

    If there were no other indicator of how bad Windows 8 really is, that would be enough proof.

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      It’s going to take more then 10 or so successful releases of linux games before it will really start to get noticed by other publishers. Linux AAA titles have sold well in the past but they were being counted as windows sales as the usual way of buying them was to buy the windows version for the assets and download a free linux installer. If anything steam should start showing some meaningful data as far as to show market potential.

    • jdaven
    • 7 years ago

    And so it begins. Linux enters the mainstream. I look forward to a more diversified OS environment where apps are available on numerous OSes giving us all choice and increasing competition to those who will remain unnamed (*cough MS cough*) to do better.

    I also hope this diversity will make it harder for malware, viruses, etc. to proliferate because of the different OS environments with significant market share. Correct me if I’m wrong, but I think it is difficult for a single virus to jump platforms.

      • Madman
      • 7 years ago

      Actually, Linux gaining 20% market share would be pretty devastating. Imagine all the masses of developers improving the desktop experience of the OS. Moreover, the price and overall stability is already a very luring proposition.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 7 years ago

        In my experience desktop linux is not as stable as Windows (especially as of 7).

        They do a rock solid job on servers, but there are still rough edges on the desktop.

          • Cova
          • 7 years ago

          I can agree that linux desktops still have some rough spots, but stability isn’t one of them.

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 7 years ago

            Use alsa around 2009 and tell me that again.

      • bcronce
      • 7 years ago

      “I also hope this diversity will make it harder for malware, viruses, etc. to proliferate ”
      It should make it easier by offering more attack vectors.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 7 years ago

        That doesn’t make any sense. There might be more attack vectors TOTAL, but each system has the same amount.

        This actually makes it harder to hit as many people as possible with a virus.

          • bcronce
          • 7 years ago

          Well, with all of my Network/Server security classes, reducing your surface area(number of attack vectors) was the most important thing.

          Thinking like a system’s security designer, I don’t think “security through complexity”, I instead think “Omg, look at all of the attack vectors”

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 7 years ago

            This doesn’t increase attack vectors on any one system.

      • shank15217
      • 7 years ago

      Linux entered the mainstream long ago, what do you mean? Do you mean dominate the mainstream because if it gets traction in desktops and laptops, it would pretty much be everywhere. Linux owns embedded systems, servers and mobile space, not much left to go for total domination.

        • bcronce
        • 7 years ago

        Android is an example of Linux going mainstream and that has malware.

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 7 years ago

          There will always be malware if you let users install things.

    • Visigoth
    • 7 years ago

    Build it, and they will come. Or in this case, port it and we will gladly pay to play. ๐Ÿ™‚

      • oldog
      • 7 years ago

      But will you and the community pay to play? I for one think that the allure of Linux is that you don’t have to pay for nuttin’.

        • Visigoth
        • 7 years ago

        This is not true. Just because free (as in beer) software exists, does not mean the Linux community at large doesn’t pay for anything. Since the market is not as large as Windows, obviously you can’t compare it head-to-head, but if you put it in percentages, Linux users actually pay more than Windows users. IINM especially in Kickstarter funds, on average Linux users pay about $12 compared to $8 for Windows users.

        So yeah, the market IS there, just waiting to be taken by a courageous company (like Valve). ๐Ÿ™‚

    • syndicatedragon
    • 7 years ago

    Hopefully the Linux port of Steam will be much higher quality than the OS X port. The Mac version is just terrible.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 7 years ago

      I doubt it.

      • khands
      • 7 years ago

      I’m guessing approximately equal, given that OSX and Linux both depend on OpenGL and have similar roots.

      • Washer
      • 7 years ago

      Was the OSX port done by Croteam or outsourced?

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        IIRC one was partially outsourced and one was an attempt to do it all internally.

    • Madman
    • 7 years ago

    I really hope it’s the sign of things to come.

    Maybe Linux will finally start succeeding, given how Android has gained the market share, and how closely related they are.

    Having Linux or Android friendly apps are actually very good, because they would play a lot better with MaxOS, Windows and other platforms.

    Steam is the only weird thing here. Because it’s a DRM and a spyware, although very handy one, so this is probably a bit against the Linux ideology.

    But yeah, I want Linux to succeed, a lot. That would finally give us a free choice – MacOS vs Linux vs Windows vs Android. And the platform lockout because of Windows only DirectX would end. Can’t wait for it to happen.

    And I’m not a Linux fanboy, I just love the free choice I have since I started using Linux alongside Windows.

      • CasbahBoy
      • 7 years ago

      Maybe I’ve been baited but I really don’t think the term spyware is applicable to Steam; spyware by definition is installed “silently” and collects information without the user’s knowledge. Steam doesn’t have anything piggybacking on top of the Steam client and while user usage patterns of the Steam application [i<]itself[/i<] are automatic and not possible to opt-out of, the Steam Hardware Survey (which includes a list of all applications installed on the user's computer) is opt-in. Edit: I'm going to correct "by definition is" to "tends to be"

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      I’m not sure that Linux ever has a chance at really taking a chunk of the PC OS market…but things are changing. Check back in 5-10 years and see where we are.

      The one thing I’m still predicting is Steam on mobile devices. Not just an app to browse Steam games, but an actual rollout of Steam games onto mobile platforms. Several games would already play on Android or iOS, and it seems right up Valve’s alley to get cheap, fun games to people.

    • Deanjo
    • 7 years ago

    I’ll believe if it actually gets released. Croteam said they were going to be releasing a linux version of the first two and both of them never made it past the beta stage.

    [url<]http://liflg.org/?catid=6&gameid=71[/url<]

      • Kurotetsu
      • 7 years ago

      It should be significantly easier now, since Valve is providing them with a distribution platform. This means they no longer have to give a crap about what distro the game is being installed on (though, really, you can accomplish that without Steam, it just takes some due diligence).

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]This means they no longer have to give a crap about what distro the game is being installed on (though, really, you can accomplish that without Steam, it just takes some due diligence).[/quote<] Quite the opposite. They have announced "Steam for Ubuntu". Previous installers for linux games were universal. [url<]http://arstechnica.com/gaming/2012/07/valve-announces-ubuntu-port-of-steam-source-engine-and-left-4-dead-2/[/url<]

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 7 years ago

          How is that the opposite? Does or does not Croteam have to worry about what distro it’s on if they use Steam to distribute?

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            That remains to be seen. A lot depends on if prepackage the libraries to go with it, use distro supplied libs or not. We don’t even know if steam uses distro specific packaging or if they took a more generic tar approach. There are a lot of unknowns so far but all indications so far that it will be Ubuntu specific with additional distros to be officially supported hopefully in the future.

          • stmok
          • 7 years ago

          Valve themselves have explained what’s going on. From their blog.
          => [url<]http://blogs.valvesoftware.com/linux/steamd-penguins/[/url<] [quote<]Why Ubuntu? There are a couple of reasons for that. First, weโ€™re just starting development and working with a single distribution is critical when you are experimenting, as we are. It reduces the variability of the testing space and makes early iteration easier and faster. Secondly, Ubuntu is a popular distribution and has recognition with the general gaming and developer communities. [b<]This doesnโ€™t mean that Ubuntu will be the only distribution we support. Based on the success of our efforts around Ubuntu, we will look at supporting other distributions in the future.[/b<][/quote<]

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]Based on the success of our efforts around Ubuntu, we will look at supporting other distributions in the future.[/quote<] As I said, at this time it looks like it will be Steam for Ubuntu. When it comes to "supporting linux" as anyone who has been around using it for a while, that usually is a sugar coated "I won't exclude the idea of supporting more but doubtful if anything will be done within the next 5 years if ever."

            • stmok
            • 7 years ago

            *Sigh*

            Its about using Ubuntu as the reference. Then build upon that, once experience has been gained, focus on other distros and try to make it universal. This is a big project and you don’t take on huge projects with so much variation. You control the variables as much as possible and build up incrementally. Its engineering.

            Its no different to China’s space program. They start off with the basic transport module as the first stage. Focus on automated docking. Then put up a research module. Followed by prolonged crew experience in space. This is then to build the crew module…Which will eventually form the core of their future space station platform.

            Come on dude, I expect you have some sort of engineering approach in your repertoire.

            • Forge
            • 7 years ago

            I’m very pleased to hear they’re using Ubuntu as their initial reference distro. Should make getting things running right on my Debian testing installs a breeze. Happy times!

            • kc77
            • 7 years ago

            Um it’s pretty rare to see anything in Linux stay distro specific. Ubuntu might be THE distro that’s supported but there’s nothing inherent to the other distros which would make recompiling impossible. Now if Steam doesn’t release the source to the final version that ships that could make things difficult but not impossible.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            Steam is not planning to release the source at all, neither are the AAA games that will be ported so recompiling again falls upon the game developer.

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