UPDATED: Ubisoft DRM allegedly installs backdoor

Isn’t it great when game publishers push overly invasive DRM? Not only does it penalize paying customers while doing little to thwart pirates, but it can also have fun side-effects. For example, as Geek.com reports, someone has discovered that Ubisoft’s Uplay software installs a browser plug-in containing a backdoor. That backdoor purportedly allows arbitrary code to be executed on the unsuspecting victim’s PC—and all it takes is a maliciously crafted web page.

Tavis Ormandy, one of Google’s security engineers, reportedly uncovered the backdoor and wrote about it on the Seclists.org mailing list on Sunday. Ormandy posted a few lines of JavaScript code as a tentative (and untested) proof of concept. The story made it onto Hacker News this morning, as did a working implementation of the proof of concept. According to the Hacker News post, the code was confirmed to work on a PC with Assassin’s Creed on a Windows 7 system with Firefox installed. The proof of concept apparently loads up the Windows Calculator.

HackerNews says the following games come with Uplay software and may make users’ PCs vulnerable:

Assassin’s Creed II

Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood

Assassin’s Creed: Project Legacy

Assassin’s Creed Revelations

Assassin’s Creed III

Beowulf: The Game

Brothers in Arms: Furious 4

Call of Juarez: The Cartel

Driver: San Francisco

Heroes of Might and Magic VI

Just Dance 3

Prince of Persia: The Forgotten Sands

Pure Football

R.U.S.E.

Shaun White Skateboarding

Silent Hunter 5: Battle of the Atlantic

The Settlers 7: Paths to a Kingdom

Tom Clancy’s H.A.W.X. 2

Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon: Future Soldier

Tom Clancy’s Splinter Cell: Conviction

Your Shape: Fitness Evolved

The folks at Rock, Paper, Shotgun provide instructions for how to track down the plug-in and disable it. The process doesn’t look too difficult or painful. Firefox users can do it through the through the plug-ins section of the Add-ons manager. Chrome users can simply enter “about:plugins” into their address bar, and Opera users have to go to the “Advanced” preference tab, into the “Downloads” section, and look for Uplay there.

Update 11:40 AM: Well, that was fast. Ubisoft has issued a statement saying a patch plugging the hole is now available. The statement was picked up by Rock, Paper, Shotgun and several other sites, and it reads:

We have made a forced patch to correct the flaw in the browser plug-in for the Uplay PC application that was brought to our attention earlier today. We recommend that all Uplay users update their Uplay PC application without a Web browser open. This will allow the plug-in to update correctly. An updated version of the Uplay PC installer with the patch also is available from Uplay.com.

Ubisoft takes security issues very seriously, and we will continue to monitor all reports of vulnerabilities within our software and take swift action to resolve such issues.

Something tells me a better fix would involve less invasive software, but hey—baby steps.

Comments closed
    • Nutmeg
    • 7 years ago

    Vrock has jumped the shark.

      • Krogoth
      • 7 years ago

      Still mad bro?

        • Nutmeg
        • 7 years ago

        About what?

    • Kougar
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]Chrome users can simply enter "about:plugins" into their address bar, and Opera users have to go to the "Advanced" preference tab, into the "Downloads" section, and look for Uplay there.[/quote<] Wait, what? The downloads section??? Plugins are not listed in the downloads section. Try typing about:plugins into the Opera address bar instead.

      • Saribro
      • 7 years ago

      You mean opera:plugins.

        • Kougar
        • 7 years ago

        They both work 😉

    • RtFusion
    • 7 years ago

    Heh, I was planning on getting the Assassins Creed games from Steam as well as Anno 2070. Guess they lost another potential customer

    Steam shows how proper DRM is done.

    Ubisoft shows how it is done the wrong way, probably THE worst way possible.

    Good job, Ubisoft.

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 7 years ago

    Saddly, this isn’t the first time this has happened…
    [url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sony_BMG_copy_protection_rootkit_scandal[/url<] To chime in on the DRM bashing, I find it funny that the lawyers make more money off the cases than they can even hope to reclaim, in addition to the cost of crating/buying DRM. Now, they will likely be sued for this. And we all know that any penalties will be passed on to the scammed consumer. Millions of dollars down the drain and we all suffer for it. I gave up on gaming a long time ago. Games just suck theses days. I miss the NES, SNES, etc. Games are about the glitz and glam, not the story or game play. I've spend hundreds of hours (at least 200) playing just one game, FF VII. I just don't see games that offer that level of fun any more. They come and go, fads. And while it is popular, most are online where some one inevitablly ruins the match for everyone. I'm sure a few people can point out exceptions (perhaps Counter Strike/ CS: Source), but this is my opinion. This story is just one more reson I don't play games... that and I'm recent dad so I don't have time any more (on top of working and 3/4 time school student). But I stopped before my daughter was born. Now I have less reasons to play games.

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 7 years ago

      It’s a growing trend. Games aren’t the only ones implementing backdoors, but they are the most infuriating. Combine that with shoddy DRM and GFWL, and you’ve effectively ruled a good chunk of people out from buying any games day1. You might not welcome lawsuits because you think the penalty would be passed on, but I disagree. This is where the competition steps in and puts them out of business. Provided we actually do see a lawsuit and get justice. Something needs to be done. If gamers stop trusting the publishers, the industry will implode.

    • BloodSoul
    • 7 years ago

    Isn’t it ironic that they are fixing their forced flaw with a forced patch? Why can’t the gaming industry see the world from a humble bundle perspective :-(.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      It’s OK if there’s a backdoor so long as Ubi is the only one that gets to use it.

      /sarcasm

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      Because they are not paying their bills by adopting a “pay what you want” model.

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 7 years ago

    I can proudly say I did not buy a single one of these games.

      • A_Pickle
      • 7 years ago

      I… just about did…

      • moose17145
      • 7 years ago

      I can also proudly say the same thing.

        • WiseInvestor
        • 7 years ago

        Me too, been boycotting Ubi since TC: Raven shield. And doesn’t care enough to pirate them either.

      • Jigar
      • 7 years ago

      Same here.

      • David
      • 7 years ago

      I can proudly say I haven’t bought an Ubisoft game new since they started their DRM crap. I have purchased 3 of their games used on the 360.

      • destroy.all.monsters
      • 7 years ago

      I dropped the ball and got Driver San Francisco on the Steam sale. I’m a bit chagrined that I did actually.

      Then again the version I actually play came off TPB so this (UPlay garbage) isn’t a problem I have.

      Not sure why it escaped me that it was Ubi that published it – but I’ll just say mea culpa now.

      • Vrock
      • 7 years ago

      Can you proudly say you didn’t pirate any of them either? If so, maybe there’s hope for PC gaming after all.

      • Ifalna
      • 7 years ago

      I can proudly say I did not play a single one of these games.

    • Vrock
    • 7 years ago

    Consoles don’t have this problem. I don’t say this as a dig on PCs, but it’s interesting. People say that consoles are killing PC gaming, but it seems to me that PC gaming is killing PC gaming.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 7 years ago

      Remember that time PSN got hacked?

        • Vrock
        • 7 years ago

        Remember that time we landed on the moon? Yeah. That’s not relevant to the topic either.

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 7 years ago

          How is it not relevant? Sony makes you sign up for PSN to get updates, and you need updates to play the most recent games. So it’s DRM just like this. And there was a security flaw just like this.

            • SPOOFE
            • 7 years ago

            If PC gaming is killing PC gaming – as anyone who clearly remembers the ’90s would attest – then anything that happens on consoles is completely irrelevant. Consoles are a result of PC gaming shenanigans, not a cause.

            • Vrock
            • 7 years ago

            The PSN isn’t DRM, dude. That is where you fail. There are DRM components to it, sure, but that’s not remotely the same as the stuff on PC games. Also, you don’t have to be connected to the PSN to play your games.

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 7 years ago

            Ok, you don’t have to be connected to Steam to play Valve games either.

            • SPOOFE
            • 7 years ago

            And Valve has a great reputation. Ubisoft does not. Clearly, we’re talking about one and not the other…?

            • Vrock
            • 7 years ago

            Yeah, I know. What’s your point? Why do you keep bringing up stuff that doesn’t have shit to do with what we’re talking about?

            None of the console versions of these games have this problem. That’s all I was saying. All the childish PC fanboys here can’t handle a simple statement like that, and took it as an attack on the PC gaming platform that simply MUST BE DEFENDED AGAINST!!!!

            My observation was that PC gaming is helping to kill itself by alienating its most fervent supporters (that is to say, the frothing at the mouth idiots who frequent this site), while the console versions of these games just work. Don’t get pissed at me for pointing this out, I’m just the messenger.

            • Scrotos
            • 7 years ago

            By “just work” you mean “gets patched continuously and sometimes has patches even before the game hits the shelf?”

            Unless of course you’re an indie dev with XBox, then you can’t afford to patch the bugs in the buggy program you shipped to customers.

            I know, your initial point was DRM but if you’re gonna get sidetracked, then I can too! 😀

            BTW, consoles are getting trifling with the whole attempt to kill the resale market with online play only active with an account-bound one-time activation code and DLC that’s account-bound as well, one-time activation. By that token you could say that console publishers are trying to kill console gaming, too.

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 7 years ago

            This story isn’t about the game not “just working” it’s about an ancillary problem.

            • Vrock
            • 7 years ago

            Yes, I know, but if you can stray off topic, then so can I. 😛

            • Lazier_Said
            • 7 years ago

            Because I don’t do my banking and taxes on a Playstation.

      • NeXus 6
      • 7 years ago

      It’s game developers that choose to use invasive DRM that are killing PC gaming. Thankfully that trend is starting to shrink.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        Who went away from DRM-free recently?

          • l33t-g4m3r
          • 7 years ago

          I think that’s the perception created by having more drm free competition available, so while the old guard never dropped drm, expanded choices gave us the illusion that there is less drm. Best not to be lulled into a false sense of security by it, as nothing’s changed that much.

            • NeXus 6
            • 7 years ago

            Yeah, but Ubisoft dropped their always online DRM and EA loosened up the activation limit. Several game publishers have ditched GFWL and settled on using Steam, which is much less intrusive. I didn’t mean they’re going DRM-free.

      • Firestarter
      • 7 years ago

      Right, as if there aren’t at least 3 different mechanisms with which the manufacturer of said console, if they should so wish, could shut down your console or lock you out permanently.

        • SPOOFE
        • 7 years ago

        “if they so wish”

        I thought they were greedy jerks that can’t wait to separate fools from their money. Instead, you assert that they’re just jerks and will shoot themselves in the foot on a lark.

        Which sounds like the reality we actually inhabit?

        • Vrock
        • 7 years ago

        Meanwhile, as you think up nefarious ways how console manufacturers *could possibly* screw you, PC software companies actually *are actively* screwing you. You were all angry about that for about six seconds until somebody pointed out that consoles don’t have this problem, and then you quickly had to rush to condemn consoles for *something*, even if it was an imagined something.

        You people make no sense. Can’t really blame Ubisoft: if I had a customer base as stupid as you all, I’d probably treat you like crap too.

      • eofpi
      • 7 years ago

      PC games from companies that respect their customers don’t have this problem either.

      The problem is proctological DRM and the contempt for one’s customers that it engenders.

      • GTVic
      • 7 years ago

      Also in the news, no one needs more than 640K of RAM

      • Ryu Connor
      • 7 years ago

      Console games due to tend to have buffer overflow type flaws. Thankfully to date, those flaws have only been used to compromise the console for purposes that fall more into the grey. For example to “jailbreak” the console. You could argue it’s also opened up an ill, which is the ability for the console to play infringing material.

      Nonetheless, the opening are there and have been exploited. They are closed systems, which aids in their security, but as the current crop of cell phones (relevant closed systems) have shown there are weak points in their armor.

      It would be dangerous to assume that consoles have an advatage here. If you’re a game developer watching your title get infringed by console specific exploits you’re definitely unhappy.

        • SPOOFE
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]It would be dangerous to assume that consoles have an advatage here.[/quote<] He pointed out one flaw that doesn't really happen on consoles, and you come back with a flaw that does? How about agreeing with him first before changing the subject? 'Twould be polite.

          • Ryu Connor
          • 7 years ago

          This Ubisoft flaw is a input validation/buffer overflow flaw.

          I’m not changing the subject. The issue appears to more that you don’t understand the subject matter.

            • SPOOFE
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<] For example to "jailbreak" the console.[/quote<] Who's jailbreaking their PC? That's what I meant about changing the subject; there's a deeper history in PC Land of exploits being used to maliciously attack users versus such an exploit USED BY the users for their own deliberate benefit.

            • Ryu Connor
            • 7 years ago

            That’s still not changing the subject.

            Jailbreaking a console often leverages a buffer overflow/input validation flaw. In so doing the user was able to bypass the defenses of the console and execute unsigned code.

            This type of flaw could have been used for great ill! Arguably infringement is one of those ills. That console communities have not yet used it to compromise the consoles in other ways is irrelevant, the fact is that code execution flaws DO exist.

            That goes directly against his opening statement.

            “Consoles don’t have this problem.”

            Yes, they most certainly do. If it executes code it will sooner or later have an input validation/buffer overflow flaw. All systems do.

      • travbrad
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]Consoles don't have this problem. [/quote<] Neither do pirated copies of the games... Good job Ubisoft. It's pretty sad when a legitimately purchased game is a bigger security risk than a pirated version.

      • Krogoth
      • 7 years ago

      Consoles can be exploited as well.

      The only difference is that gaming consoles don’t have the money a.k.a personal information to steal to make it worthwhile for crackers to go after. The gaming console demographic is dominated by kiddies who typically throw more information on their normal PC and portables via (facebook and other social networking).

        • travbrad
        • 7 years ago

        Yep the likelihood of something being exploited all depends on the potential value that it will yield, which is basically a multiple of how valuable each users data is, how many users there are, and how secure it is.

        That’s why there are so many exploits written for Windows. With Windows’ huge market share/userbase there is a lot of potential value in exploits written for it, and people store a lot of valuable data on their Windows PCs (usually their main PC). There’s a lot less value in your savegame data or xbox live “buddy list”, than there is in tax returns, credit card info, etc.

      • entropy13
      • 7 years ago

      That’s like saying “unlike you (PC), who has cancer (such DRM), I don’t have cancer (such DRM). I (console) have HIV (everything in a console) though.”

        • Vrock
        • 7 years ago

        Let’s say you’re right. Guess what?

        Steve Jobs had cancer. He’s dead.

        Magic Johnson, on the other hand, got HIV when I was a teenager. He is still alive, thanks to advancements in treatment and technolgy.

        Console gaming is Magic Johnson. PC gaming is Steve Jobs.

        I’ll take Magic Johnson, thanks.

          • entropy13
          • 7 years ago

          LOL I might as well instead use a cancer survivor as the cancer example and someone who died due to HIV as the HIV example.

          As you yourself said, “thanks to advancements in treatment and technolgy (sic)”, they both have roughly the same mortality rates. Still not the same as heart disease though.

    • canmnanone
    • 7 years ago

    wow this bullshit company still exist? people stop supporting companies like this so they can go bankrupt. i have not bought a game from this company since sc:ct since i found out this bullshit company does this kind of things. i never will in the future.

    • superjawes
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]Ubisoft DRM allegedly installs backdoor Isn't it great when game publishers push overly invasive DRM?[/quote<]PC gamers LOVE having backdoors invaded. /sarcasm

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]Ubisoft has issued a statement saying a patch plugging the hole is now available.[/quote<]Something tells me that plugging the hole won't make it feel better...

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 7 years ago

        Ubisoft has sneaked up on our backsides again.

          • egon
          • 7 years ago

          When it comes to DRM, gamers have been willing to bend over and take it in the rear for years.

    • yogibbear
    • 7 years ago

    So my Assassin’s Creed Revelations steam sale purchase is essentially worthless? Thanks Ubisuck…

      • eofpi
      • 7 years ago

      That’s what you get for not checking for DRM before buying.

      • tanker27
      • 7 years ago

      I bought the whole collection during the Steam sale, I have just checked, rechecked, and double-checked for the offending plugin and its not there. Just be cautious.

    • lilbuddhaman
    • 7 years ago

    I almost want to say “how is this news” because I am in no way surprised. BTW, what’s Sony been up to lately?

    • jdaven
    • 7 years ago

    So can we organize some kind of boycott of the gaming industry until DRM polices are ended.

      • Chrispy_
      • 7 years ago

      [b<]The only way to boycott is to not pay for the games; Money is the only thing they understand.[/b<] Pirate the games with DRM, enjoy the game without DRM interference, then spend the money you saved on little indie firms that are making innovative, original titles, unshackled from the corporate greed that is suffocating the gaming industry in sequel after sequel of unoriginal drivel. [i<]Edit2: Giving money to the indie firms is more important than not giving money to the big corporations, since your individual boycott is likely to have no real effect on their enormous revenues.[/i<] I mean just look at that list - 17 of the titles are sequels of tired old franchises that have been beaten to death by repetition. Of the three non-sequel games, Pure Football was a clone, and flopped massively on all platforms, R.U.S.E could be considered decent, though it's hardly original and Beowulf: The Game is something that I'm sure everyone involved would rather forget about. [b<][i<]Edit before backlash:[/i<][/b<] Piracy is bad, okay. It takes money away from the [s<]game developers who need your money to keep making more games[/s<] greedy publishers who crap all over us, treat us like scum, and abuse their position as a middleman between developers and consumers by infusing software with their own DRM-laden silliness, installing backdoors, mandating always-online stupidity, making 0-day DLC that isn't free to download, and then requiring you to install their [s<]advertising and user-monitoring platform[/s<] [i<]software distribution platform[/i<]. So don't pirate games guys.

        • HisDivineOrder
        • 7 years ago

        That would work if Ubisoft didn’t have other places to go to sell their games. If you do this, then Ubisoft will stop making games for PC altogether. I think that’s worse than the crappy DRM. At least some people are enjoying their games this way, even if their crappy policies drive a lot of other legitimate users away.

        I think it’d be better if we had a way to virtualize a PC environment for each game so that when we install a game, it makes changes to only a virtual version of the OS tailored for THAT specific game. When that game turns off, the entire environment switches to the baseline install. Let every program TRY to make changes to the baseline, but in actuality only make changes to a virtualized version.

        Give us a way to do that and not lose performance, bam. Problem solved.

        Or you can just not buy/install Ubisoft software on a Windows install you care about.

          • Forge
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<]That would work if Ubisoft didn't have other places to go to sell their games. If you do this, then Ubisoft will stop making games for PC altogether. I think that's worse than the crappy DRM.[/quote<] We agree to disagree. I'd boycotted Ubi for a long time, I will simply resume. [quote<]I think it'd be better if we had a way to virtualize a PC environment for each game so that when we install a game, it makes changes to only a virtual version of the OS tailored for THAT specific game. When that game turns off, the entire environment switches to the baseline install. Let every program TRY to make changes to the baseline, but in actuality only make changes to a virtualized version.[/quote<] VMware can do that. Requires VT-d to feed a GPU to the VM raw, though. The CPU/system overhead is entirely tolerable with a modern gaming rig. The GPU needs direct passthrough to be useful.

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 7 years ago

            Can VMware do dx11? I wonder if this is actually feasible. Overall, it sounds like too much hassle for multiple games, and something that should be built into the OS instead.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        It’s fun to crap on publishers or industry associations of all types as evil boogeymen but doing so reveals a lack of basic understanding of the role publishers play in the creative process. They fund development and look for a return on that investment to put it simply. Some of the things they do are bad, sure, but too many people completely vilify them without acknowledging the role they play in content development.

          • Chrispy_
          • 7 years ago

          Their role in content development is bile that pollutes the gene pool of innovative software. I am justified in vilifying them. Their funding comes at the cost of them ruining the original idea. How many times have you seen a game ruined by publisher interference? Enough times, I am sure.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            Games that wouldn’t exist for lack of development funding otherwise. I know black/white all-or-nothing extremism is popular and simpler to shout about but the world is grey.

            • lilbuddhaman
            • 7 years ago

            Diablo 3 is a pretty “black” case of the game being ruined by greed, imo. And notably, amazing reviews from the press, horrible reviews by real people.

            • superjawes
            • 7 years ago

            Alternatively, how many indie games get mainstream support? How many of them are broken? There are major trade offs. Publishers are less likely to allow something with a good name to go through without some polish.

            I would argue that CoD releases are pretty solid on release, albeit too conservative to innovate on much. Indie games get to innovate a lot, but many lack the shine that AAA titles have, and rely on broken, pre-releases in order to fund themselves. I do love Minecraft and Kerbal Space Program, but neither game is finished, and both have bugs and incomplete mechanics.

            Overall, I think that the major publishers do push too hard on development studios, but at the same time, making something complex, shiny, AND good takes money, and getting that cash can be complicated, inconsistent, and risky without a publisher.

            The best way to specifically target DRM is to focus on the agreeable kinds. DRM can integrate cloud features, unlimited installs, and other online mechanics without creating a new backdoor in their PC gamers (if you know what I mean). There are solutions that gamers and publishers can agree on if we push in that direction.

          • entropy13
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<]They fund development and look for a return on that investment to put it simply by already setting "guidelines" (which are actually more like a 'framework' already in which the developers are essentially being corralled into).[/quote<] ftfy

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 7 years ago

          I’m not sure what your point is. I’m not allowed to complain about publishers because they have a lot of money?

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            No, that’s not the point. Try again.

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 7 years ago

            I really have no idea what your point is, other than maybe reading complaints over and over becomes tiresome.

        • OneArmedScissor
        • 7 years ago

        That’s not a boycott. If you pirate games, then you send a very clear message that you want their product so badly that you will even obtain it illegally.

        When will you people learn that you only encourage them with both your rhetoric and actions?

          • Chrispy_
          • 7 years ago

          I’ve been cracking games I purchase since the early days of copy protection. I don’t like being punished for doing things legally.

            • OneArmedScissor
            • 7 years ago

            That’s even worse! Again, where does the boycott come in here?!?

            • Chrispy_
            • 7 years ago

            Yeah, I guess I’m not answering directly. My point is that regardless of whether I buy the legal version or not, DRM has never ever stood in my way.

            I may be wrong, but I’m pretty sure no DRM-laden game has every been crackproof. There’s always a group that has a crack out, and it’s available [i<][u<]before[/u<][/i<] general release in nine out of ten cases. If there is a game that has yet to be cracked, I'd like to know, just out of curiosity. The take home argument is that no matter how much money invested, inconvenience caused, technical exploits opened up by DRM technology, it does not stop even your average Joe from getting his hands on a torrented copy of it. The solution is to provide incentives for people to buy legally, not attempt to discourage illegal downloads; [i<]Those are guaranteed to happen anyway, DRM or not![/i<]

          • destroy.all.monsters
          • 7 years ago

          It doesn’t send that message at all. There could be zero piracy and they’d still find an excuse to use drm.

          The problem is people paying for it. Ubi’s had several titles not do so well after the drm was explained – Silent Hunter 5 for instance. That pressure needs to be maintained.

          Since titles will be cracked and released no matter what – and companies that are married to drm will stay so no matter what it’s really the only thing we can do. Whether you download it or not makes no difference. What does is when paying customers refuse to buy.

        • eofpi
        • 7 years ago

        Pirating the games that have bad DRM just tells the publishers that their current DRM isn’t working, and many of them take that to mean they need even worse DRM next time. This, clearly, is not the message we want to give them.

        Instead, contact the publisher and explain in a calm, clear manner why you not only refuse to buy their game, but why you wouldn’t accept it if it were given to you for free. If you’ve enjoyed prior games in the series (assuming the game in question is a sequel), tell them that, and that their DRM is costing them sales to people who want to play it, but can’t/won’t because of the DRM.

        Companies like Ubisoft can’t change their ways if they don’t know something’s wrong, and the only way they’ll find out is by people reaching out to them.

          • superjawes
          • 7 years ago

          The first step is admitting that there is a problem…

          But yeah, the first thing that the PC community needs to do is stop feeding the fire. Pirating DRM games suggests that the DRM just isn’t strong enough, resulting in more damaging DRM.

      • lilbuddhaman
      • 7 years ago

      When it comes down to it, we don’t matter. At all.

      -The “average” consumer is an idiot, the “average” consumer makes up 90%+ of their sales. The “average” consumer doesn’t make, read, or care about internet forums, articles, or discussion.

      -The mass media (the IGN’s, the Kotaku’s, etc etc) are complete shills. They don’t poorly review games by big publishers unless it’s a complete turd….and if it’s a big IP, they’ll STILL give it a great review, despite the turd status. They all read like you’re reading their own webpages. Glorified advertisements.

      -Metacritic/Amazon reviews are constantly passed off as “oh that’s just internet trolls”, so there goes that option.

      So we can boycott, complain, make as much noise as possible; but we’ll be drowned out by these big companies and their ever-growing reach on the industry.

      /grumble

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This