Reports suggest imminent GeForce GTX 660 Ti launch

Four months on from the release of the GTX 680, Nvidia still has a big, gaping hole in its GeForce 600 series. Older, 500-series models with 40-nm silicon continue to populate the $100-400 price range, as they have for the past year. Where are their replacements?

About a couple of weeks out, according to a story by Sweclockers. The Swedish site claims to have snagged some details about an upcoming GeForce GTX 660 Ti, which it expects to launch on August 16.

Sweclockers suggests the GTX 660 Ti will be virtually identical to the GeForce GTX 670 in all but one respect: its path to memory will be 192 bits wide instead of 256 bits. If my math is right, the narrower memory interface should reduce bandwidth from 192.2GB/s to about 144.2GB/s. The GTX 660 Ti is also expected to have a tighter power envelope—150W instead of 170W.

Sweclockers expects the GeForce GTX 660 Ti to retail for 3,000 Swedish Kronors. Since the GTX 670 apparently sells for around 3,600 SEK, that would make the newcomer about 17% cheaper. Subtract the same difference from the GTx 670’s U.S. price tag (around $400), and we end up with a possible asking price of around $330 for the GTX 660 Ti. That’s probably not cheap enough to make the card into a mid-range value king, but it should still be nice to have a less expensive Kepler option at the high end of the market.

In related news, the folks at Expreview over in China have posted pictures of what they claim to be the cooler from an EVGA GeForce GTX 660 Ti. As far as I can tell, the cooler looks an awful lot like what EVGA straps to its GeForce GTX 670. If the two cards have the same GK104 silicon, which seems likely if their specs are almost identical, then I suppose that isn’t entirely surprising.

Also, Turkish site DonanimHaber reports that the existing GeForce GTX 550 and GTX 560 are about to reach end-of-life status. I’m having trouble making sense of the Google translation, but the site clearly refers to upcoming GeForce GTX 660 and GTX 650 models. DonanimHaber seems to be saying those two cards will feature GK106 and GK107 silicon, respectively, while the GTX 660 Ti will feature a hobbled version of the GK104.

Comments closed
    • rhysl
    • 7 years ago

    I,m looking to upgrade my GTX295 , would this be a good card to go too ?.

    I run all games at 1920×1200 BF3 just does 60fps at Medium settings. I have a Corei7 920 with 6GB

    • willmore
    • 7 years ago

    I’m finally looking to upgrade my GF9800GTX+. My monitor is only 2048×1152, so I don’t need some $300-$400 card to play the games I want to (Borderlands2). My timeline is the release date for Borderlands2 and my budget is $200.

    So, I guess I’m getting something from AMD? I’d really like to get something in 28nm for power efficiency reasons–and some sense of future proofing.

    Any suggestions?

      • Airmantharp
      • 7 years ago

      An HD7850 2GB should do it; you’re just a little higher than 1920×1200 screens in total pixels.

        • willmore
        • 7 years ago

        A quick search of NewEgg didn’t show any 7850’s in the 100-200 price range. There seems to be a big gap between 150-200 (possibly higher). I’ll search again. Thanks for your suggestions!

    • flip-mode
    • 7 years ago

    To be totally fair, “big gaping hole” doesn’t quite do it justice. It’s more like a big gaping hemisphere or something like that.

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 7 years ago

      goatse.cx?

    • xeridea
    • 7 years ago

    They really don’t know how to make more than one chip, then sell neutered versions. They may never get a midrange card. They are running out of numbers, to use, they already have the POS 640, only thing left is the 650, and there is a huge performance gap between utterly useless 640 and the 660. Of course with Nvidias model numbers, its really hard to tell the difference between what each card actually is, and the 600 series is looking to be the worst series yet in this regard.

      • Airmantharp
      • 7 years ago

      It’s not a function of knowledge as much as it is of economics.

      • Airmantharp
      • 7 years ago

      Also, you do realize that they’re parting out their mid-range silicon here?

      You can blame AMD for there being a gap here; had GCN been faster for games, Nvidia would have been forced to sell GK104 as a GTX660Ti at most, which is what it was planned to be.

        • ultima_trev
        • 7 years ago

        Doubtful. nVidia probably knew from the start GK110 was too hot and power hungry to be clocked high enough where it could make any decent performance improvement versus GK104.

    • Star Brood
    • 7 years ago

    I don’t even want more performance than what’s already out there. I just like knowing that the cards are going to be supported with up-to-date drivers that are tested to be working properly, and I also like the lower power consumption. Otherwise, I would buy a 500-series card – but with the 28nm tech delivering something like 50% less power consumption I do not want to miss out on that. It’s not even about the electric bill, for me it’s being energy-conservative for the day I switch to expensive, limited solar.

    • can-a-tuna
    • 7 years ago

    Good. Hopefully AMD drops that Radeon’s price I’m just about to buy.

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    It’s hard to get excited about yet another harvested GK104. Nvidia is riding on the similarity in name to the 560Ti, but this is only the smallest step up from sticking a new label on an existing product, a la G92 and it’s many aliases.

    GK106 is where it’s at, but that is months away; Nvidia is using all the marketing spin it can muster to keep people thinking the $200 cards are imminent until they have real midrange silicon. It doesn’t take a genius to work out that they have been caught with their pants down again.

      • Airmantharp
      • 7 years ago

      I’ll agree that it is hard to get excited about a further cut-down GK104-based product that doesn’t bring with it the benefits that a GK106-based card would, primarily in the heat and (possibly) noise area. Still, if this card competes effectively in it’s price bracket, it will be a great upper mid-range solution, and until I see detailed proof that AMD has improved their micro-stuttering issue in Crossfire, a pair of these might be the best way to power a 4MP+ display.

        • xeridea
        • 7 years ago

        Nvidia and AMD both have microstudder in Xfire/SLI, each brand tends to have more of it in different games, but they still both have it. Its just a simple fact of life you will have to live with using multi-gpu solutions. There aren’t any games that really have a need for multi-gpu anyways though.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      This isn’t really like G92 because (so far) it’s only spanned one generation. I don’t have a problem with die harvesting as long as it’s competitive all around.

        • Chrispy_
        • 7 years ago

        No, it’s not exactly like G92, that’s why I said it was a samll step up from this.

        They’re still harvesting an existing product (GK104) but misleading people into thinking that this is a replacement for the 560Ti. Marketing spin intentionally deceiving the uninformed into thinking Nvidia has a new product when it’s not, it’s an old product with a new sticker, and I’m pretty sure the delayed release of the GTX670 and now the GTX660Ti are artificial delays too. They are attempting to make it look like they’re releasing “new” models when in fact it will probably end up being close to 12 months between GK104/107 and GK106 when the dust settles.

        As for the harvested GTX660Ti being competetive, it likely will be. (Nvidia will price it to exactly match the current market). What it won’t do is bring a more competetive GPU to the market. It won’t be cheaper to make, it won’t use less complex boards, it won’t have drastically less complex cooling requirements. It won’t bring new levels of efficiency to HTPC environments, and it won’t give AMD a reason to change their pricing on the (I am speculating) 7800-series competing products.

          • erwendigo
          • 7 years ago

          Oh yeah, the GK104 is a very oooldddd product. You are insane, man!!! ¬¬

          This is a new product with a chip with MONTHS of life in the market. The GK104 is the REAL sucessor of the GF114, so, why are you whining about the GTX 660 Ti? Harvested? Man, WTF? What is the relation between “use harvested gpus” and the “G92 and rebranding”?

          And man, your “conspiranoic theory” is bullshit, because THIS NEW talks about the launch of the GTX 660 and 650 (GK106 and GK107).

            • Chrispy_
            • 7 years ago

            I’m just saying that the harvested parts would definitely have been made before the perfect parts. Yields get better over time, not worse, so Nvidia has been sitting on (stockpiling) imperfect yet functional silicon for the GTX660Ti and the GTX670 for longer than the GTX680 has been on the market.

            That’s not conspiracy theory or insanity, it’s a common practice called die-harvesting and it’s been going on for decades. The only difference is that Nvidia is (wisely) delaying the launch of these products for two reasons:

            1) To artificially raise demand for the high-end products by withholding better-value parts from the market
            2) To divert attention away from the potential 9-12 month gap between GK104 and GK106 that would exist if they lauched the 680, 670 and 660Ti all at the same time in Q4 of last (financial) year. By staggering their product launches it shifts focus away from the fact that Nvidia still has no midrange silicon to replace the GF114’s price point yet.

          • BestJinjo
          • 7 years ago

          GTX660Ti is going to end up competing with HD7950 not HD7870 if it’s priced at $300-330.

      • sonofsanta
      • 7 years ago

      I think that if they’ve been caught with their pants down, it’s only because they were surprised at how good GK104 is. I’d expect that to have been planned for the midrange they’re currently failing to fill but when they realised it performed at top-end levels, they figured they may as well cash in and hold GK100 back for next generation.

      I say this as someone with an all AMD machine, incidentally, before we get into any tired old cries of partisanship.

    • jdaven
    • 7 years ago

    Finally!

    • MadManOriginal
    • 7 years ago

    Needs to be $200-250 like the GTX 460 was at launch. Maybe the non-Ti card based on a smaller chip will be in that price range.

    • rogue426
    • 7 years ago

    I was hoping for a $250- 300 price range. I have 3 450 GTS’s that need to be replaced, I’ve been holding off updating my FAH cards. Maybe the 560 TI 448 will go down on release.

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 7 years ago

      My sentiments, exactly. I don’t want to deal with AMD’s lag in releasing drivers for new games (especially the lag they had last year). I want to buy an nVidia card, but I do not want tech that is not much less than it was last year. I want new tech, new cards, and I want mainstream versions at the $200 range that offer a reasonable upgrade over the $200 options from last year.

      Instead, we got last year’s crap, last year’s crap, and more last year’s crap. Or the 7850 1GB at $200.

        • Arclight
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]I don't want to deal with AMD's lag in releasing drivers for new games (especially the lag they had last year).[/quote<] Your view of Geforce drivers is a bit rosey. I have a GTX 560 Ti and been stuck on 295.73 since the end of March due to TDR issues which are oh so notorious, specially for the 560s. So regardless of nvidia churning out more driver revisions you're not guaranteed you can use the latest.

          • d0g_p00p
          • 7 years ago

          What is this driver issue you are talking about (TDR?)? I have the 301.42 drivers running on a 560Ti without any issues.

            • Arclight
            • 7 years ago

            [url<]http://lmgtfy.com/?q=GTX+560+TDR[/url<]

        • BestJinjo
        • 7 years ago

        NV is going to have a $150 card for you and it’s going to be GTX650Ti coming in September. The problem is it’s going to lose badly to the HD7850.

      • jihadjoe
      • 7 years ago

      There are already rebates on almost every 560/560Ti/560Ti-448 card on newegg.

      MSI’s 560Ti-448 Twin Frozr has a $50 rebate +free game on it.
      [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127615[/url<]

      • shank15217
      • 7 years ago

      The 7850 at $200 makes every 5xx obsolete, if you buy one now your’e just doing it out of some brand loyalty.

        • rogue426
        • 7 years ago

        I’d be happy to buy an ATI/AMD card when Stanford optimizes FAH cores to run on them like they have Nvidia’s cards, until then I buy the green camp’s cards for the Folding benefits.

    • Frith
    • 7 years ago

    I’m really not sure where this card is supposed to be positioned. The top end seems overloaded with products while the mid-range is devoid of options.

    Where’s the mid-range card we’re all waiting for? Retiring the 550 and 560 without anything to replace it seems strange. At this rate I’m going to end up waiting for the 760…

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 7 years ago

      I too do not think any $320-$400 card is a “mainstream card.”

    • derFunkenstein
    • 7 years ago

    Man, there is just no desire to compete at $200 and provide something substantially better than a 6870 or GTX 560 (non-Ti).

    Not that there’s not desire to buy – I’d go for something in that range.

      • Washer
      • 7 years ago

      Eh? The HD7850 is better than both the HD6870 and GTX560Ti, not substantially but definitely better.

        • ImSpartacus
        • 7 years ago

        From the cards he mentioned, I don’t think he actually meant $200, since both the 6870 and 560 are closer to $150 than $200.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 7 years ago

          Yeah, I got the price range wrong, what I meant was >560 or >6870 at the same price. My overarching point is that nobody wants to provide a better value that’s worth upgrading from a 40nm card at the same price.

            • BestJinjo
            • 7 years ago

            It’s more like the 28nm wafers are more expensive, new fabrication facilities cost more than ever to build, and it’s becoming harder and harder to shrink transistors. GPU makers haven’t passed on these rising costs for 2-3 generations. They finally did it now with AMD raising prices and NV passing it on in a different way – by selling much smaller dies (and as a result just 35% more performance from GTX580). If you want much better cards for $150 than 560/6870, skip this generation completely or wait until fire sales when HD8000/GTX700 series launch.

      • BestJinjo
      • 7 years ago

      MSI TwinFrozr HD7850 2GB was $210 on Newegg not long ago and most HD7850s hover at the $220-240 price level. HD6870 and GTX560 cost $150 right now. You can’t expect a card much faster than them at initial MSRP. HD6870 debuted at $230 or so and then fell in price. The same will happen to HD7870/GTX660 cards in 6 months.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        And it’s not any faster than what was previously available at that price, which is my point.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This