Windows 8 hits RTM, on track for release

Whether you like the changes in the next version of Microsoft’s operating system or not, Windows 8 is on track for its October 26 launch. Today, Microsoft announced that Win8 has been released to manufacturing, which means the product’s development and testing are essentially complete. The blog post I just linked offers a nice roadmap of what comes next, from the distribution of Win8 to PC makers and developers on August 15th through the general availability of the OS and systems based on it in late October.

I’m very curious to see what happens next, and I feel like it’s not something one could necessarily predict. All of the components of a bizarre failure are there, including sweeping interface changes that don’t work especially well with touchpads and mice and an apparent closing off of the open Windows software ecosystem via the imposition of the Microsoft Store. At the same time, the addition of a new touch-centric interface and some nice enhancements for desktop power users could conceivably make Win8 popular with those who upgrade. The $39.99 upgrade price certainly lowers the stakes for those who give it a shot. Hmm.

Comments closed
    • Anarchist
    • 7 years ago

    this is like watching a train wreck in a super slow motion …

    • cheapFreeAgent
    • 7 years ago

    I predict they will release the first Service Pack soon.. silently.

      • Ricardo Dawkins
      • 7 years ago

      uh???? bahahahahahahahaha….
      More comedy.
      Do you remember the days before XP SP2 ???
      MSFT was embarrased worldwide by how insecure XP was back in the day…. that didn’t deter them to tell everyone to pick & upgrade to SP2 ASAP.

    • jtennison
    • 7 years ago

    Perfectly happy with Win7. I see no reason to upgrade to a new UI that looks like it was designed by 12-year old kids for 8 year old kids.

    • Malphas
    • 7 years ago

    The whining over Metro is pathetic beyond belief. It’s a very slight inconvenience at the absolute most, other than that Windows 8 is just Windows 7 with a few new low level features and performance and stability improvements. Seriously, people considering switching to Linux because they have to launch programs in a slightly different way from before? What a fucking joke. Idle threats more like, we all know Windows 8 is going to do fine just as every previous version did (including the similarly derided Vista) and by the time Windows 9 is out all this Metro whining will be dead and buried.

    It’s funny how a lot of the people complaining about Windows 8 consider themselves “power users” (scoffing at the “kiddy” interface, going on about how tablets are toys, blah blah.) when every actual power user doesn’t even use the Start Menu anymore. Everyone I know that spends a lot of time on a computer, like IT professionals, just launch programs by going Windows Key > start typing name of program until it appears > hit enter, which is exactly the same method you can use in Metro. It’s far faster and more efficient than navigating a cursor around the “All Programs” list, clicking through a bunch of folders. Seriously, who the hell even does that anymore other than old grannies? The Start Menu has been dead for years and Metro is finally a step in the right direction towards a UI that’s appropriate for this decade.

      • Wirko
      • 7 years ago

      Power users will find an alternative. There are a few around for them. I, for one, like to have many shortcuts at hand and keep the desktop clean at the same time, so I would maybe consider 7Stacks instead of the customized Start menus that I now use in XP/7/2003/2008.

        • Malphas
        • 7 years ago

        I’m not quite sure I if I’m misreading your sentiment, Wirko, or you misread mine. I’m saying that the people whining about not having a Start Menu in Windows 8 are largely people who think they’re more advanced users than the actually are. Genuine “power users” (I hate using that term) will be mostly unphased by the changes in Windows 8 because they’re not using their using their computers in a dated Windows 9x style way anymore, unlike the people complaining. So yes, you’re right power users will evolve methods and find more efficient ways of navigating the UI, just like they did with previous interface changes.

          • Wirko
          • 7 years ago

          I understand your point was that there exist “dated” ways of using a computer, and I cannot agree. You too have probably seen IT pros using console in Windows. Some may call the console obsolete but it’s here to stay.
          I’m not sure if it makes me a power user or a luser but I use the Start menu a lot. I have reorganized it to my liking, which includes creating new subfolders (e.g. Oracle for everything Oracle-related, Connections for a long list of RDP and VPN connections, and so on, everything sorted and with separator lines). And there are taskbar shortcuts, of course, for the most common tasks. Yes, I will adapt and reorganize everything again when there are no other options left anymore, but as long as I can have a [b<]well-structured, pretty much customizable launcher[/b<] aka Start menu, I will keep it, it may be old, but it doesn't rot.

      • Krogoth
      • 7 years ago

      People are too hung over the superficial stuff and are missing the changes that will affect them like the new WinRT model, which is pretty much Microsoft’s way of forcing all application developers into Windows Store.

      Windows 8, it is all about the app store.

      WinRT already breaks a ton of freeware applications that used to work fine on XP, Vista and 7. Freeware writers have to pay a license to get their apps working under WinRT.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        Win RT doesn’t “break” anything that ran on previous versions of Windows – it just doesn’t run them because they’re x86 apps you’re trying to run on an ARM device.

          • Krogoth
          • 7 years ago

          Care to explain why CCC and Xonar XG Control panel don’t work under Windows 8 when at heart it is just a tweaked version of Vista/7?

      • Madman
      • 7 years ago

      Windows is no longer the only stable and relevant OS. Linux is stable and offers some advantages like price/CLI/multiple desktops/ease of installation, MacOS offers style and bling. So if I think that Windows8 impedes with my workflow, so long Windows.

      And it’s not about few clicks, it’s about general multitasking and ease of use on the main workflow. I’m not going to pin 30 apps I use routinely. I enjoy start menu without flashing and loosing the on screen information, or rescanning the whole 30″ screen with my eyes, even if I use start menu rarely. I hate ad platform and locked-in app market, I hate multitasking between Metro and Desktop apps, I hate missing close option for Metro apps. I hate horizontal scrolling and charms.

      Just like for Ubuntu-Unity, there is a viable, easy to use alternative which is also free. I’m not a fanboy of MacOS or Linux, but I recently switched to Linux Mint, and it doesn’t piss me off. So why should I pay and get annoyed by some fugly GUI if I can get a clean and neat GUI for free. It’s called free choice.

        • Chrispy_
        • 7 years ago

        Linux does not have DirectX.
        This is sad, since we’re stuck with Microsoft but it doesn’t change the facts.

      • Kaleid
      • 7 years ago

      “Everyone I know that spends a lot of time on a computer, like IT professionals, just launch programs by going Windows Key > start typing name of program until it appears > hit enter”

      This isn’t exactly fast.

      Most used programs are in the taskbar: 10 at the moment
      Second most used programs are available through the start menu: 16
      Those which are rarely used are on the desktop: 15.

      It’s very convenient to access programs without typing.

        • Malphas
        • 7 years ago

        ” This isn’t exactly fast.”

        Actually, yes it is. A lot of trading firms and other time critical industries don’t allow their employees to have a mouse on their PC because it’s been consistently proven by telemetric data that it slows down individual actions and overall productivity having the user constantly removing their hand from the home row to a mouse and then back again, compared to learning and using keyboard shortcuts.

      • khands
      • 7 years ago

      The big issue, from my standpoint, is that the average business user will lose productivity with the layout of metro and Windows 8’s defaults. Most people in our office (and the business I worked at prior) use a two monitor solution and have an average of 25 or so different windows open at once. From the little I’ve used Metro (and I’ll admit, it’s been a few builds) it does not seem beneficial to that style of multi-tasking and will cause a bunch of people to require to figure out new work flows. Now I understand my office and prior office may be atypical to the general public but I know from at least our current workflow standpoint that anything that impedes it, even if it helps us manage these resources better, will be fought, and I don’t think I’m alone on this.

      I don’t think Metro is a bad thing, I just don’t think it should be required nor the default in business settings, and that will make a serious dent in the adoption of the OS if that sentiment is shared by the majority. Metro looks like a great touch pad platform, and I look forward to an x86 compatible tablet that’s actually user friendly, but for the primary use of Windows in business it seems to get in the way more than help.

      • FuturePastNow
      • 7 years ago

      It’s a “slight inconvenience” that adds zero value and can’t be turned off.

    • moog
    • 7 years ago

    As long as MS can just dodge layoffs this year, giving some more runway… I hope next year’s releases are better received.

    • thebeastie
    • 7 years ago

    So can we leech the full version of Pirate Bay now or bloody wot?
    And is ther going to be a jail break for steam? This is what we need right?

    Heh if Apple sue ms for sticking their iOS ideas into win8 everyone now is going to hope Apple win πŸ™‚
    There the good guys now πŸ™‚

    • Ricardo Dawkins
    • 7 years ago

    #20 is comedy gold….
    every night I peruse around these blog posts….and I always find some Apple, Linux or Google fan around here spewing comedy gold…..

    what a joke…hahahaha XD

    • bjm
    • 7 years ago

    Regardless of how you feel about Windows 8, or even about Microsoft as a company itself, this release will no doubt be the most significant release of Windows since Windows 95.

      • Ari Atari
      • 7 years ago

      That’s a good way to put it, “significant”.

      • moresmarterthanspock
      • 7 years ago

      Significant, yes. Positive? We will see. Remember when we voted for change in 2008? We didn’t bother to ask, “What kind of change?” Well, we see what kind of change he meant now. So, just because Windows 8 is a significant release doesn’t mean it is a step in the right direction.

        • HisDivineOrder
        • 7 years ago

        I could argue you’re an idiot for thinking there were any better options in 2008, but instead I’ll call you an idiot for trying to bring politics into something distinctly non political. Leave the election out of this.

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      I started to use windows when 95 came out. Before that I refuse to buy a Windows PC.

      And now with Metro, I back to looking elsewhere for my next PC.

        • HisDivineOrder
        • 7 years ago

        That’s fitting since Metro harkens back to a day when we had a basic UI (DOS) and could swap to a desktop manager if we needed one (Windows). Metro brings back the glory days of screen swapping!

        Wooooooo!

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      If the internet had been as always-on-everywhere in 1995 as it is now in 2012, I think you might have seen a similar reaction to Windows 95. OMG PROGMAN ALL THE WAY!

        • bjm
        • 7 years ago

        It was like that on the BBS scene. “No! I will continue to run my BBS nodes through DESQview despite Win95s DOS virtualization capabilities! I don’t need to damned Macintosh-wannabe OS!” Not to mention your OS/2 holdouts, though they may have had better reason. It’s always interesting how the ebb and flows of history continually repeat themselves.

    • Frith
    • 7 years ago

    Microsoft know that if they release a bad operating system it won’t significantly impact their market share. That said, I can’t help but think they’ve gone too far this time and are angering too many people at once:

    [list<][*<]They've angered their users by forcing unwanted UI changes without any customisation options. [/*<][*<]They've angered PC manufactures by producing an unpopular operating system which, like Vista, will likely cause a multi-year sales slump in already troubled PC market. [/*<][*<]They've angered tablet manufactures by producing their own tablet which will directly compete with OEMs. [/*<][*<]They've angered digital retailers, like Steam and Blizzard, by bundling a competing digital distribution service with Windows 8. [/*<][*<]They've angered software developers because they will no longer be able to sell some of their software through their own websites. Metro applications have to be sold through the Windows store with Microsoft keeping 30% of the revenue. [/*<][*<]They may well anger regulatory bodies since bundling is an illegal practice for monopoly firms. The inclusion of a Windows 8 Store could easily be perceived as Microsoft trying to leverage its OS monopoly to gain a dominant position in the digital distribution market.[/*<] [/list<] Despite all this I doubt they'll be any major moves in terms of OS market share, since most users will probably just stick with Windows 7. I think the real problem will be with Windows 9. I can't see Microsoft abandoning the UI changes and letting users disabled Metro and enable the Start menu, nor do I see Microsoft abandoning the Windows Store. With Windows 8 Microsoft is definitely shooting itself in the foot, but with Windows 9 I suspect Microsoft will shot itself in the head. Nobody can break the Windows monopoly but Microsoft itself, and it looks like they're planning on doing just that.

      • brucethemoose
      • 7 years ago

      1. People here on TR aren’t your average user. Though the lack of a start menu was met with outrage, the metro design as a whole has actually been praised. Only time will tell if consumers like Windows 8.

      2. Unlike Vista, Windows 8 isn’t a bloated performance hog (in fact, I just replaced Vista on an old PC with W8). Again, this all depends on how W8 is received upon release.

      3.Yup.

      4. They can whine and flail their arms all they want, but Windows gaming isn’t going anywhere. Unfortunately, OpenGL doesn’t have the traction to replace DirectX anytime soon. EA and most other companies are already in the $1 app business, so whatever bandwagon Valve’s starting won’t be big enough.

      5. What’s stopping them from selling through their website? MS only taxes metro apps, plain old desktop apps are the same as they always were. MS isn’t forcing Metro apps upon us, they’re just annoying us by slapping them in front of the desktop.

      6. Again, no-one’s forcing you to buy Metro Apps. If the Windows Store was in danger, the iOS and Android appstore would already be gone.

      Given how consumer focused W8 is, and how conservative business users are, I don’t see W8 overtaking W7 like W7 did with XP. We won’t know what Windows 9 will be until W8 is on shelves.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]6. Again, no-one's forcing you to buy Metro Apps. If the Windows Store was in danger, the iOS and Android appstore would already be gone.[/quote<] Different rules for monopolies, of which MS has legally been declared one.

          • Madman
          • 7 years ago

          And, there is no way you’ll be able to install anything but MS approved Metro apps on WinRT. From what I understand.

            • mnecaise
            • 7 years ago

            That’s why you need the development evnironment. Just give me the code and I’ll force it onto the machine(s). It’s good to be a developer.

        • JohnC
        • 7 years ago

        “the metro design as a whole has actually been praised” – by whom? By a Microsoft-sponsored and Microsoft-selected “focus groups” and by similarly sponsored web bloggers/”reviewers”/magazines? I have personally installed Windows 8 CP on one of the spare desktops at home and let my 60-year-old parents try it out; after a couple of days they both “gave up” and said to give them their old PC (running Windows 7) back. They found it more confusing than the Apple’s OSX (which I also let them try on my MacBook Pro)…

          • brucethemoose
          • 7 years ago

          [url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metro_(design_language)#Response[/url<] Praise from Engadget doesn't mean much, but IDEA's been around since 1965. Also, Metro =/= Windows 8. Windows Media Center, the Xbox 360 OS, MS Live, Office, most MS web based services, and WP7 all use the "metro design language". People mostly aren't frustrated with Metro, just Windows 8. Personally, I think metro is the best looking UI I've seen in awhile, (although it added quite a bit of spam to Windows and the Xbox 360 IMO). And I'll bet your parents didn't like it for the same reason mine didn't: no start button, and no shortcuts on the desktop by default. Add the Control Panel and a few important shortcuts to the desktop menu, make a startup script that shows the desktop by default, and it's almost exactly the same.

            • JohnC
            • 7 years ago

            Since the article of this topic is about Windows 8, that is exactly what I meant by “the metro design”. Although I could easily say the same thing about, for example, XBox’s new interface – personally I don’t feel like it “enhances” my XBox experience in any positive way, the original XBox360 GUI was just as useful for me…
            And I’m sure it will be possible in the final version to use 3rd-party programs to get the start menu back, turn off the whole “tiles, tiles everywhere!!!” crap and other things like “point the mouse at this corner – shit pops up, point it at that corner – different shit pops up”, make easier access to control panel and files, but then what was the whole point of wasting all the time on implementing this crap for desktop version of this OS? And why can’t Microsoft make it easier for people to switch to proper “classic” GUI by default, without using any 3rd-party modifications, especially for older people or very “casual” people for whom it may be hard to figure out how to bring the “classic” look back?

        • FuturePastNow
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]1. People here on TR aren't your average user. Though the lack of a start menu was met with outrage, the metro design as a whole has actually been praised. Only time will tell if consumers like Windows 8.[/quote<] Spoken like someone who has never watched an "average user" try to use a Windows 8 PC.

          • Sahrin
          • 7 years ago

          >Spoken like someone who has never watched an “average user” try to use a [s<]Windows 8[/s<] PC. FTFY When did average users become UI savants?

            • FuturePastNow
            • 7 years ago

            Never, and changing things on them so dramatically is going to cause big problems.

            I’ve always said that techies are going to have the least problem using Win8. Be annoyed by it, yes, resent that annoyance, yes, but have actual problems using it? No, because techies know keyboard commands and know how to install alternate themes if necessary.

            95% of computer users have never used a keyboard command or opened an options menu in their life. These people are going to [i<]hate[/i<] Windows 8.

            • bjm
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]95% of computer users have never used a keyboard command or opened an options menu in their life. These people are going to hate Windows 8.[/quote<] How much of those opened apps or used options through touch?

            • Madman
            • 7 years ago

            How do I shut down the PC? Hmmm, flip the master switch on the wall :))))

            • Sahrin
            • 7 years ago

            >I’ve always said that techies are going to have the least problem using Win8. Be annoyed by it, yes, resent that annoyance, yes, but have actual problems using it? No, because techies know keyboard commands and know how to install alternate themes if necessary.

            That is why you fail. Techies are the opposite of what you’re describing. These are people who love technology, and get jollies out of the next big thing. They are the antithesis of what you’re describing. The *average* user (minus the part about themes, because that’s stupid…less than a tenth of a percent of all users have ever used themes) becomes frustrated with a new piece of technology. A techie gets excited. A techie looks at it as a challenge.

            >95% of computer users have never used a keyboard command or opened an options menu in their life. These people are going to hate Windows 8.

            It’s literally like you don’t understand the point. It’s like you’ve been using 3.1 your entire life, and you’re saying “what the fuck do I need a taskbar for?” The fact that it makes you able to work faster and more efficienctly is irrelevant. This is *exactly* why *you* are an average user – not a techie. And it’s exactly why when Windows 8 v2 comes out you’ll hail it as the best Windows release ever. You’ll just be 3 years behind everyone else.

      • Sahrin
      • 7 years ago

      >They’ve angered their users by forcing unwanted UI changes without any customisation options.

      Didn’t realize Win8 was a mandatory upgrade. Good to know, I guess it’ll be free.

      >They’ve angered PC manufactures by producing an unpopular operating system which, like Vista, will likely cause a multi-year sales slump in already troubled PC market.

      Vista was the second best selling OS of all time.

      >They’ve angered tablet manufactures by producing their own tablet which will directly compete with OEMs.

      …? What tablet manufacturers? Apple?

      >They’ve angered digital retailers, like Steam and Blizzard, by bundling a competing digital distribution service with Windows 8.

      Oh no, competition. However will consumers recover. Windows has 90%+ of the market today, and it will still have it on 96%. It’s really hard for me to understand how you’re going to realistically cast more competition in the digital distribution environment as a negative. Isn’t the reason we all love Steam because it *competes* with B&M?

      >They’ve angered software developers because they will no longer be able to sell some of their software through their own websites. Metro applications have to be sold through the Windows store with Microsoft keeping 30% of the revenue.

      Well first of all, all software has to be retailed – not just software sold through the Windows Store. Which means there is a cost of retail overhead for all software sales. Do you know what that figure works out to be, on average? That’s right. 30%. Microsoft is taking the same cut that other retailers have been, but they’re providing free support for things like patching and downloading rolled into the cost. I think that vendor lock-in sucks and I’m against it, but the public seems to be voting pretty strongly in favor of in-house stores.

      >They may well anger regulatory bodies since bundling is an illegal practice for monopoly firms.

      There are no anti-bundling laws, there are anti-trust laws and anti-monopoly abuse laws. You’ll notice that Windows today comes bundled with a browser, even though this was the source of the lawsuit in the 90’s. Bundling isn’t illegal.

      >The inclusion of a Windows 8 Store could easily be perceived as Microsoft trying to leverage its OS monopoly to gain a dominant position in the digital distribution market.

      This is certainly true, and I’m interested to see how it will play out. My hope would be that MS would have its own store, and compete equally with other vendors like Steam using a system analogous to the browser ballot in the EU. Steam is gentrifying, and it needs a kick in the ass.

      I wonder if you idiots realize that these are the same bullshit posts you made about Vista and WDDM. Well, you loved the Vista reskin called 7, and I’m sure you’ll love Windows 8 v2 as well, once you satisfy your ego. Sorry that the world progresses and that you didn’t forsee the direction it would go.

        • Shouefref
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]Vista was the second best selling OS of all time. [/quote<] That's one of the biggest lies ever spouted by MS marketing. Lot's of people buying VIsta bought XP at the same time to downgrade their pc's. The fact is that once Vista was on the market, MS didn't want you to buy XP anymore. That's alos why this is such a big lie: [quote]Didn't realize Win8 was a mandatory upgrade. [/.quote] Once W8 is n the market, you HAVE to buy W8. You DON'T have a choice. W8 IS pressed upon people. You have no idea how shop assistants looked at you when you entered a shop and wanted a pc without Vista. And, yes, MS is loosing the market. The consumer market, that is. Those people are turning away from MS, mostly to Apple. And MS knows that, therefore they try to make up for the lost income by getting more money form the people who stay with MS.

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      MS is falling off a cliff, and it feels like flying.. all the way down until you hit the pavement.

      MS is just high enough right now not the see the pavement πŸ™‚

      Linux is for ‘us’ (the geek that like computer because they are computers)
      But I see the ‘facebook’ windows users just getting a mac when it come time to upgrade.
      Why bother getting an OS that look like what they are working at mac donalds “Do you want an extra large angry bird with that” ?

      And Apple next iDevice will make metro look retro… Apple is making sure that if you get one of there product you want to use all their products.
      Does an xbox make you want to buy a windows7 phone? Does a Metro laptop make you want to buy a zune ?

      MS strategic mind is so deficient. MS just react. no initiatives πŸ™

    • Neutronbeam
    • 7 years ago

    I’ve decided to tiptoe into Win 8–my desktop stays Win 7 for now, my back-up laptop goes Win 8, and my netbook stays Win 7 permanently. IF I can adapt to Metro on the laptop then I’ll consider it for the desktop.

    ‘Progress is only made through trial and error.”

      • moog
      • 7 years ago

      You would perceive more benefits on your netbook with Win8 since it’s lighter on resources.

        • Madman
        • 7 years ago

        This is also where Win8 touch really has a great chance, because net-books have crappy input methods, and no one is using them for productivity work anyway.

    • Captain Ned
    • 7 years ago

    If there’s no Start Menu it’s not Windows (apologies to the 3.1/3.11 holdouts). My phone is my phone, my Zune is my Zune, and my PC is my PC. I see no earthly reason to merge any 2 of the 3 let alone all of them.

    This post brought to you by “Get off my lawn you smelly Occupier” with a side order of “sonny boy”.

    Harrumph.

    [/Couldn’t find an appropriate HHGTTG reference for this one, though the smelly photocopier woman came close.]

      • Krogoth
      • 7 years ago

      Start Menu didn’t go away.

      It became a “Start Screen”, plus app-store front-end.

      You can recreate the classical desktop with a few shortcuts, but it you end-up getting Windows 7/Vista with some minor under the hood upgrades. (Hyper-V support, improved thread scheduler and improvements on some of the built-in tools)

      • ludi
      • 7 years ago

      That’s okay; Windows 3.x wasn’t really Windows, either. It was more of a 16-bit Metro that was primarily used to toggle between Solitaire and Minesweeper.

      • ShadowTiger
      • 7 years ago

      The reason to merge them is because Windows can’t succeed in mobile without apps. If they encourage everyone to make apps in html5 and javascript so that they are cross platform, then it will build their app library faster.

      Apps are a big selling point for mobile devices, so it makes sense. I realize this doesn’t help the majority of windows users, but at least you can understand their strategy now.

      And stardock made a free utility you can install to give you a start menu again, if thats your main problem.

    • Madman
    • 7 years ago

    Just checked out the comments at Windows team blog – [url<]http://windowsteamblog.com/windows/b/bloggingwindows/archive/2012/08/01/windows-8-has-reached-the-rtm-milestone.aspx[/url<] Now I know where they get the shiny UI testing numbers πŸ™‚ Everyone loves Windows 8 there, all 100%.

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      Thats because if MS fall on its face they will have to find new jobs πŸ™‚

      • Sahrin
      • 7 years ago

      >Now I know where they get the shiny UI testing numbers πŸ™‚ Everyone loves Windows 8 there, all 100%.

      Because most of the readers of the dev blogs have actually used the OS.

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        It’s more like most of the readers of a dev blog are fanbois to begin with.

        I mean I bet I can go check out any OS X or Linux/BSD Dev blog and see the same things said about their respective systems.

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 7 years ago

          I bet a lot of Linux users are contrary just for the sake of it, so it might be mixed in those parts.

        • Madman
        • 7 years ago

        Have you actually used the OS?

        I have.

    • Madman
    • 7 years ago

    I have my thoughts about Windows 8…

    But anyway, I’m really, really excited to see how this all will play out.

    A lot of unknowns, a lot of new limitations and changes that are not even talked about or reviewed, like ARM and classic desktop apps. The pricing is unknown.

    But this can be, no, actually I believe it will be, a game changer for the whole industry.

    This will definitely be very interesting.

      • eitje
      • 7 years ago

      YOU ARE A MADMAN.

    • Deanjo
    • 7 years ago

    Every time I see Metro’s UI on a desktop I cannot help but think it was developed by the same company that makes Duplo blocks, lego. You have your power users that buy their kinect line, the regular user who uses the lego line and then they give you oversized building blocks that are aimed for toddlers except windows 8 discontinued the kinect line and you have to go to the back of the factory and speak to a guy in a trenchcoat in a dimly lit alley to get the lego line.

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      Have you seen a fast food ordering station 10 years ago?

      A touch screen that look almost the same as the metro start screen.

      Thats what MS want us all to use at home to play angry bird…. sigh

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        Ya and they still usually got the order wrong, lol.

    • TheQat
    • 7 years ago

    I tried it out for about a month with no real problems. Metro is annoying and unnecessary on the desktop but I didn’t find it getting in the way *too* much–mostly it just added two-three clicks to some processes that used to take 1-2.

    Love the new copy/paste UI, the new Task Manager, the new UI font, it seems to boot much faster than 7. No perceptible loss of overall OS performance (i.e. it’s no XP->Vista transition). For $40 I’m probably gonna go through with it.

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      The little thing are nice. All could be a $19 ‘service pack’ to windows7

      but I disagree about the metro start screen. that thing irritate me to no end, I’m look at any ways to start program without having to have my screen flash this crap.

      • flip-mode
      • 7 years ago

      How [i<]dare[/i<] you!

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 7 years ago

      See, that’s the thing for me. Two-three clicks to processes that used to take one to two add up. Because there are a LOT of those damn cases where I’m wasting more time to do the same things.

      It also annoys me that Microsoft will NOT enable the same options to use the old way they’ve always done in every prior version of Windows. Change the UI, I don’t care, but offer an option to go back to the old way if the user prefers and sets the option. When MS decides they know best and forces me into a scheme that is INFERIOR in a lot of really important ways to the current system in order to shove me into their app store, then I suddenly get annoyed.

      They’re not serving MY needs. They’re serving theirs, exclusively. And without apology.

    • oldog
    • 7 years ago

    Almost everyone agrees that the classic Windows interface does not scale well to small screens such as tablets and phones.

    I would point out that the current 7th version of Windows doesn’t scale well to very large displays either.

    It may be that everyone is missing the point and that the new interface is really for giant displays like the one in Balmer’s office.

    • ALiLPinkMonster
    • 7 years ago

    I’m still really excited to see how Win8 plays out in the tablet world, especially with Ivy Bridge based devices in the works.

    Besides that… I guess it’s about time to start learning Linux.

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      I had fun learning some Linux. It’s nice to have some proficiency in multiple operating systems.

      However, you won’t need to begin a complete conversion for a few years. As long as 7 gets support, you will be pretty covered in the desktop space, and the general state of computers in 2-3 years is going to be different whether or not Win8 fails.

      On the topic of tablets, though, I am also excited to see what happens. The iPad is doing well, but Apple in general needs to do a major post-Jobs release (like a major product update) to see if they will continue to dominate the market.

        • sschaem
        • 7 years ago

        I think any HW advance is going to be minor… the gold will be in the services and built in apps.

        I expect a major new i Device to be released by the end of the year, and its going to be massive.
        MS and Sony wont know what hit them…

    • Xenolith
    • 7 years ago

    A lot depends on how hacker friendly it is. Can you swap in 3rd party desktop to replace metro for instance. There are a lot of nice features being added for desktop users… it would be a shame that the UI holds it back.

    • superjawes
    • 7 years ago

    Brace yourselves.

    Anti-Windows 8 posts are coming.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      OMG THEY’RE HERE!

        • ALiLPinkMonster
        • 7 years ago

        NOOO! *jumps out 7th floor window*

          • Wirko
          • 7 years ago

          … seeing that the 8th floor is full of smoke …

      • torquer
      • 7 years ago

      So long as no one defends Microsoft or suggests Linux is anything other than PC nirvana, we should be cool.

      Bring on the “M$” and “Windoze” references as well as the Bill Gates Borg drone wallpapers!

        • ALiLPinkMonster
        • 7 years ago

        Bro, Linux is teh lamez and Win8 will be a revolution. Ivy Bridge sucks Bulldozer all the way. KB/M is dead controllers and touchscreens are the future of desktop systems. I have a pin-up of Captain Price on the wall above my desk.

      • Wirko
      • 7 years ago

      But the new Task Manager is so sexy, I want to use it all the time! No, I mean it!

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