Sub-$200 GeForce GTX 650 Ti expected next quarter

That GeForce GTX 660 Ti we keep hearing about sounds like a solid card—if the rumors are to be believed, anyway—but it doesn’t look inexpensive. As we reported a few days ago, the card might end up costing as much as $330.

Happily, it sounds like Nvidia has a cheaper Kepler derivative in the works: the GeForce GTX 650 Ti. Turkish site DonanimHaber has snagged a few details about that product, including specifications, positioning, and a potential release time frame.

The site says the GTX 650 Ti will replace the vanilla, non-Ti GeForce GTX 560. The cheapest variants of that card currently retail for $170 at Newegg (less if you count mail-in rebates), so the GTX 650 Ti might end up in the same price range. DonanimHaber expects Nvidia to release the GTX 650 Ti at some point next quarter. If I were a betting man, I’d expect a release timed with the holiday shopping rush.

As far as specs go, the GTX 650 Ti will reportedly feature a new GK106 graphics processor with 960 ALUs, a 192-bit memory interface, and either 1GB or 2GB of GDDR5 memory. It’s hard to make predictions without knowing clock speeds and other details, but that doesn’t seem like a massive step down from the $400 GeForce GTX 670. That offering, for reference, has 1344 ALUs, a 256-bit path to memory, and two gigs of GDDR5 RAM.

Comments closed
    • alwayssts
    • 7 years ago

    TLDR:

    The simplist way to put 650ti/660ti is that they are stronger products than 7850 (650ti) and 7870 (660ti), but not one greater up the AMD food-chain (7870 and 7950) if you overclock.

    GDDR5 allows the split of uneven ram across a bus. There should be no impact other than the loss of ROPs and total bandwidth. In the case of 660ti, this could be a potential deal-breaker because 6008/192-bit meshes pretty perfectly for most avg gamer settings around the avg stock clock (950mhz)/ipc of 1344 nvidia shaders.

    If it clocks to 1100/7000, great…no bottleneck for the most part and 2GB should be enough for 1080p. If one of those fails to clock well because of binning or tdp allowances, for all intents and purposes it’s (on average with AA) only as strong as it’s weakest link.

    Considering prices for the products they will beat are already similar or lower to what the nvidia products will launch at, with likely price cuts coming after the nvidia launches so the parts that trump them are then a similar price or only rationally more expensive, none are really a bad choice. The thing that nvidia has going for it that their cards will be slightly better than AMD’s largest margin/potentially best two deal cards, the 7800 series. 650ti will probably overclock to ~7870 stock performance, the sweet spot for baseline 1080p atm (ala 30fps 4xAA in BF3), and hence be good-enough for many and perhaps cheaper. 660ti will be between 7870/7950, but again probably cheaper than the later and ‘good-enough’ for worry-free 1080p play while having distinct thermal (because of die size, ram amount) and size (smaller card for smaller cases versus 7950) benefits.

    End of the day, I think it’s really going to be tough to beat the current and future deals on 7950 for $/perf, especially at higher resolution. That said, cheaper for the same task done similarly is appealing, lots of people like smaller/cooler cards, or just green claws and pixies…and that’s perfectly fine.

    • TO11MTM
    • 7 years ago

    Dear Nvidia:

    Please let this thing support 4 monitors so I can ditch AMD like a bad habit.

      • Krogoth
      • 7 years ago

      Care to explain?

        • tfp
        • 7 years ago

        It sounds like he would like to drive 4 monitors and if the new card can he will switch from his current AMD setup which he does not seem satisfied with.

        Staples – “That was easy”

      • rrr
      • 7 years ago

      Oh, you’re an AMD hater?

        • OU812
        • 7 years ago

        Or maybe he is tired of having problems with AMD products

    • rogue426
    • 7 years ago

    Is Nvidia making so much money on the GTX 670’s , that they are purposely dragging their feet on the 660’s? Or are they really having problems releasing the 660. At least the specs look good for the 650Ti, but how long are they going to leave that $200-250 price vacant with a Kepler offering.

      • Chrispy_
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]Is Nvidia making so much money on the GTX 670's that they are purposely dragging their feet on the 660's?[/quote<] My guess is "yes". The GK104 is just a tweaked version of GF114 used in the 560Ti. It is midrange silicon in every way - die size, complexity and manufacturing costs. A lot of people complained about the cost of the GTX680 for what was obviously a cheap GPU for Nvidia to produce, but you can't argue too much because it was priced competetively against the competition. The reason I think they've been artificially dragging their feet is because Nvidia nailed the all the stages from design to manufacture ages ago. It is already tested and working. Nvidia have: [list<][*<]successfully updated their architecture and drivers from Fermi to Kepler. [/*<][*<]successfully chopped GK104's four GPC clusters down to one GPC cluster to make the GK107. [/*<][*<]successfully dealt with the step-down to TSMC's 28nm manufacturing process. [/*<][*<]successfully competed against AMD with their previous-generation GF114.[/*<][/list<] They haven't quite EOL'ed the 560 and 560Ti because it's still profitable to sell the GF114 at current market prices. It's 25-50% quicker than a 7770-GHz edition and actually still competetive with the 7850. With AMD's high prices on Pitcairn-based products, there is no good reason for nVidia to stop selling GF114 at the same price they have for ages, because it's simultaneously profitable whilst letting them clear old inventory.

      • Beelzebubba9
      • 7 years ago

      I think it has more to do with yields from TSMC’s 28nm process. if nVidia can’t get all of the GPUs they want to sell, why waste fab capacity on a $200 card when you could use it for a $400+ card?

      I’m sure they’d love to have kepler products at every price point, but I’d wager they’re just trying to make as much profit out of what they have to work with.

    • codedivine
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]a 192-bit memory interface, and either 1GB or 2GB of GDDR5 memory.[/quote<] Thats odd. With a 192-bit interface, one would have expected something like 768MB or 1536MB of memory. I guess Nvidia is using the same trick they used on the 550Ti. Here is what TR wrote about the 550Ti memory config: [quote="Cyril"<] Nvidia has incorporated some special sauce that allows the GTX 550 Ti to feature an even 1GB of RAM despite its lopsided memory interface. ...... In other words, two of the memory controllers shoulder 256MB each, and the third controller has 512MB all to itself. [/quote<]

      • tviceman
      • 7 years ago

      Nvidia paired odd amounts of ram with the 192-bit gtx550ti aka GF116, so this is just following in those footsteps.

        • Chrispy_
        • 7 years ago

        It was also disappointingly slow, the 550Ti being massively underwhelming at 1080p as a result.

        Not sure why that comment needed a downvote, you only have to read TR, Anand, TPU, G3D reviews to see that it was an overpriced, underperforming disappointment.

        The first 768MB on the card behaved well with a 192-bt memory bus. The problem was that once you pushed detail and resolution up high enough to need more than 768MB, the effective memory bus of that last 256MB was [b<]only 64-bit[/b<]; The memory bandwidth dried up at higher resolutions [b<][i<]just when you needed it most![/i<][/b<] Many reviews I saw called it a pointless marketing stunt, stating it would have been better off with 768MB RAM.

    • Star Brood
    • 7 years ago

    Now I know why the mid-range has been taking so long, because for 1080p gaming it looks like the 650 is going to handle it all.

    Maybe nVidia doesn’t want to release some third-rate graphics but I would prefer that, instead of a ridiculous delay, that they took one or two of their previous-gen cards and simply made them more energy-efficient. I dig the GTX 570 but the power consumption would fit on a six-pin connector the way things have gone since the move to 28nm.

      • BestJinjo
      • 7 years ago

      Using your logic that 650Ti will handle everything at 1080P, so could an unlocked HD6950 2GB. Those cards used to sell for $230-240 as early as February 2011. So what NV is delivering here with the 650Ti is a card that most likely will be barely better than an unlocked HD6950 but will be nearly 2 years older by the time it launches! Really, this is the slowest roll-out for NV I’ve seen in a long-time and on their part the worst performance increase from one major generation to another. Actually based on the specs of the 650Ti, it probably wouldn’t even be able to beat an overclocked GTX570. So the only positive about it is the power draw and DX11.1 support check mark. The leaked benchmarks for GTX660Ti show that it tanks hard with AA/AF modes on. Chop off even more shaders from that card and GTX650Ti will be lucky to hang in there with the HD7870 once you turn on AA.

        • flip-mode
        • 7 years ago

        It’s definitely the slowest Geforce roll-out ever. Whether or not that really matters, I do not know.

        • DPete27
        • 7 years ago

        The reason the “performance increase” is dismal is because of the slow roll-out. New cards are sitting on the shelves alongside previous-gen cards more than ever. So while the newer cards cost less to make, charging less for them would gut profits in the old cards that are filling the holes. Hence, pricing is following performance, not cost which translates into a percieved small performance increase.
        That being said, (and if my assumptions are true) AMD had a really big chance to almost completely shut Nvidia out of the midrange market had they priced their 7770 – 7870s a bit lower from the get go….expect price cuts once the 650Ti launches.

          • Star Brood
          • 7 years ago

          The average selling price of the Radeon 6850 has increased by $10-$15 across the board in the last 6 months. Moo.

            • BestJinjo
            • 7 years ago

            Ya, that sucks. HD6870 and GTX560 have been good options at the $150 level though. Actually HD6870 hit $150-160 in August 2011. So it’s been at $150 for 1 year now.

          • BestJinjo
          • 7 years ago

          I agree with your point on pricing but it doesn’t change the fact that outside of GTX670/680/HD7950 OC/7970, there will not be a good performance increase for people still running GTX570/unlocked 6950 2GB unless they spend extra for the top cards.

          AMD had HD7850/7870 since March 2012. NV isn’t launching GTX660/660Ti/650Ti until mid-August/September. That’s a 5-6 months lead already. 5-6 months behind is huge in the GPU world. At least Fermi had very notable advantage:

          (1) tessellation
          (2) 1.28-1.5GB of VRAM on 470/480
          (3) good OCing headroom on 470/480 and especially on the 460.

          GTX650Ti doesn’t look like it’s bringing anything worth talking about over 7850/7870 and the crippled GTX660Ti will lose against an overclocked 7950 with AA on because of it’s 24ROP/192-bit setup. Really, the best card for NV this round is the GTX670. Being 6 months behind for the entire product roll-out is insane. We might as well use the argument that once GTX650/660/660Ti cards launch, we should wait another 6 months for HD8000 series if we are going to dismiss the delay.

          NV’s strategy seems to be to wait until AMD launches, then up the clocks a bit to get that 5-10% extra performance and claim to be winners. You have to consider the time-frame. If you launch way later, you should be faster.

          GTX650Ti/660 launching in mid-August/September — I don’t get the claim that AMD lost on its big chance in the mid-range?

          AMD had the $200-350 price bracket all to itself over the course of the last 5 months with the 7850/7870.

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 7 years ago

      It’s taking a long time because nVidia has a lot of 570 GPU’s still floating around out there. They tried to get rid of the excess with the 560 Ti 448, but I’m guessing that wasn’t enough because they’ve been delaying the 660 Ti for an eternity now, trying to clear all that inventory.

      The problem I have with buying a 570 for a sale price now is the low amount of video memory. It’s clearly going to be a bottleneck in the near future for anyone running 2560×1440/1600. I don’t need any AA or a lot of AF, but I do need a quieter, cooler, less power hungry video card with 570-esque performance. And I don’t want to deal with AMD’s habit of forcing its users to wait months to play games that just came out.

      So nVidia’s intention to get rid of excess inventory and my intention not to install a heater into my computer have led to me… sitting on my hands.

        • BestJinjo
        • 7 years ago

        Ya, I get that. I read that NV had 120,000 of excess units of GTX570 to sell out off from KitGuru. However, don’t expect GTX650Ti to be a GTX570 replacement. It probably will be slower. The card you’ll want is either HD7950/GTX660Ti for a noticable improvement over the 570. Also, HD7850 has been available for very good prices for at least 4 months now. Not sure why you waited all this time. With overclocking, it’s as fast as the GTX580 and consumes way less power.

    • ALiLPinkMonster
    • 7 years ago

    Thank the heavens they’re not using anything less than GDDR5.

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