AMD adds new FirePro GPUs, first FirePro APUs

Today’s a big day for AMD’s workstation offerings. The company has unleashed a smorgasbord of FirePro workstation graphics cards, and it’s also introduced a pair of APUs that feature integrated FirePro graphics instead of Radeon IGPs—the first of their kind.

Let’s have a look at the new, discrete FirePro offerings first. They span price points from $599 to $3,999, and like the FirePro W600 that debuted in June, they’re all based on AMD’s latest 28-nm graphics silicon and Graphics Core Next architecture. Here they are:

  FirePro

W9000

FirePro

W8000

FirePro

W7000

FirePro

W5000

GPU Taihiti Taihiti Pitcairn Pitcairn
TFLOPS (SP) 3.99 3.23 2.43 1.27
TFLOPS (DP) 1.00 0.81 0.15 0.08
Memory bus 384-bit 256-bit 256-bit 256-bit
Memory 6GB GDDR5 4GB GDDR5 4GB GDDR5 2GB GDDR5
TDP 274W 189W <150W <75W
Display outputs 6 Mini DP 4 DP 4 DP 2 DP, 1 DL-DVI
Price $3,999 $1,599 $899 $599

The two Tahiti-based models feature dual-slot coolers, while the Pitcairn-powered cards both take up only a single slot. (Tahiti and Pitcairn are the chips that power the Radeon HD 7900 and Radeon HD 7800 series, respectively.) AMD claims all four offerings are capable of driving as many as six displays, though only the FirePro W9000 actually has six display outputs on the card. The others require DisplayPort hubs to drive that many monitors.

There are two entries in the FirePro APU lineup—both with integrated graphics and quad Piledriver cores, just like AMD’s Trinity consumer chips, on which they’re likely based. The AMD FirePro A320 is a 100W part with a 3.8GHz base clock speed and a 4.2GHz peak. The FirePro A300 has a tighter 65W power envelope, a 3.4GHz base speed, and a 4GHz peak. Both variants feature 384 integrated graphics ALUs. The A320 clocks those ALUs slightly faster, at 800MHz, while the A300 runs them at 760MHz.

Both of the new APUs are certified for use with professional computer-aided-design and media-and-entertainment software, and AMD claims the FirePro A300 has more graphics horsepower than the Quadro 600, Nvidia’s entry-level discrete professional GPU. AMD expects FirePro APUs to start showing up in pre-built workstations later this month.

Comments closed
    • sparkman
    • 7 years ago

    Help me understand. In the APU version, what good are the extra CPU cores?

    I assume Windows can’t schedule PC software on those.

    Are they for OpenCL threads?

      • Airmantharp
      • 7 years ago

      The CPU cores are the CPU for the system; the APUs are in CPU sockets, not on add-in cards. I get the confusion though, as there’s only a picture and table for the GPU versions.

      The APU ‘FirePros’ are just AMD APUs with professional drivers for the integrated GPU; makes tons of sense for systems that just need the driver to run the applications properly, but don’t need any level of discrete performance.

        • sparkman
        • 7 years ago

        Oh, now I get it. You mean a Firepro APU is not a card, it is a regular chip just with better drivers for the GPU portion. Thanks.

    • crabjokeman
    • 7 years ago

    In the table, the GPU is typo’d as ‘Taihiti’.

    • Airmantharp
    • 7 years ago

    People are looking for Radeon-branded versions of these for multi-GPU systems. Would that be so hard to do?

    I mean, you’d need three or four HD7900s to do 5x1080p, with 6GB each, and at least one would need to have 6 DP ports if you wanted to avoid tearing due to TDMS/DP timing issues right?

      • rrr
      • 7 years ago

      Maybe you should check retailers, Radeon branded version were released a good while ago…

        • Airmantharp
        • 7 years ago

        Link please? Seriously, I can’t find any.

    • brucethemoose
    • 7 years ago

    Other sources say the W5000 is a Cape Verde GPU, and a 128 bit card, not a 256 bit Pitcairn. The other specs, like 1/2 the speed and 1/2 the power consumption of the W7000, just don’t fit with a Pitcairn based GPU anyway.

    EDIT: Tahiti with a 256 bit bus? Is that possible?

    [url<]http://semiaccurate.com/2012/08/07/amd-firepro-2012-lineup/[/url<] EDIT2: [url<]http://www.amd.com/us/products/workstation/graphics/ati-firepro-3d/w8000/Pages/w8000.aspx#3[/url<] Now I'm very confused. Curiously, the 7770 and W5000 are both rated for 1.3TFLOPS SP, but the W5000 seems to be Pitcairn based with very, very slow 800MHZ GDDR5.

      • Alexko
      • 7 years ago

      I believe Pitcairn has twice the geometric processing power per clock of Cape Verde, hence the use of the former in this little FirePro.

      And yes, Tahiti with a 256-bit bus is possible, you just have to disable 1/3 of the original bus, which is common practice in the industry. I guess the aim here is to provide 4GB of RAM vs. the 3GB you’d get with 384 bits. Of course 6GB is possible too, but that’s apparently reserved for the W9000.

    • south side sammy
    • 7 years ago

    FirePro APU’s……………….. figures, I just got an Intel E3-1230v2, 16gigs of ram and a new motherboard……..today…….. think they would put these things out a week earlier… LOL………….. might have been something to look into.

    • maxxcool
    • 7 years ago

    Wondering if the APU’s are fused? Or if it is a firmware/bios string detection with the possibility of enabling “driver support” on standard apu’s….

    • Silus
    • 7 years ago

    Text is incorrect here:

    “(Tahiti and Pitcairn are the chips that power the Radeon HD 7900 and Radeon HD 7700 series, respectively.)”

    It should be HD 7800 instead of HD 7700.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      I was thinking a 256-bit memory bus was more than a 7700 card had but I wasn’t sure.

      • Damage
      • 7 years ago

      Doh, of course. Missed that in editing. Fixed.

        • ermo
        • 7 years ago

        Just curious here, but how long does it typically take to edit one page and how many different people review an article before it goes live?

          • derFunkenstein
          • 7 years ago

          You should never ever ever proofread or edit your own stuff. So hopefully the answer is >1.

    • drfish
    • 7 years ago

    Huh, the FirePro APUs are pretty slick. We use Solidworks but our models are ridiculously simple and we don’t need much power to work with them. However I get dinged occasionally when I need support for the BS excuse of not using a supported GPU/driver (I have yet to have a problem that wasn’t solved some other way) so it would be nice to use these and shut them up instead of needing to buy discrete cards in either desktops or laptops.

      • Chrispy_
      • 7 years ago

      We have a few workstations that need huge amounts of GPU power and we run Geforce-flavoured Fermis instead of Quadro-flavoured. Never once have I seen an issue with the Geforces that didn’t also affect our Quadros so I’ve just started blatantly lying and saying that we have Quadros throughout.

      Apart from a little intentional performance crippling, the difference between Geforce and Quadro drivers is a whole lot of hot air.

        • drfish
        • 7 years ago

        100% agree – but when the Solidworks support consists of an error reporting tool that shares system specs I can’t get away with that. 🙁

        • GTVic
        • 7 years ago

        Apparently if you do any high performance rendering over an extended period you will very quickly notice a difference between a GeForce and Quadro card and drivers. That is taken from posts by someone who appears to know what they are talking about.

          • south side sammy
          • 7 years ago

          and the guys at TR are going to do a benchmarking thread on this exact topic in the very near future…………….

            • ULYXX
            • 7 years ago

            Dont tease us like that. That would be freaakiinn awesome. 🙂

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