Dell’s new 27-inch IPS monitor doubles price of Korean imports

27″ IPS monitors have been a hot topic recently, and now Dell has a new one. Like typical 27-inchers, the UltraSharp U2713HM offers a 2560×1440 display resolution. Dell claims the panel covers 99% of the sRGB color gamut and says the LED backlight pumps out a maximum brightness of 350 cd/m². The U2713HM’s grey-to-grey response time is rated at 8 ms, which should cut down on ghosting, and the anti-glare screen coating should prevent reflections from competing with what’s on the screen.

The official product page for the new monitor details a generous assortment of features, including a fully adjustable stand that can swivel, tilt, and raise the screen by 4.5 inches. Rotating to a portrait orientation is supported, as well.

Behind the screen lies a weath of inputs: dual-link DVI, DisplayPort 1.2, HDMI, and even an old-school VGA connector. There’s also a USB 3.0 input for the integrated four-port hub. That certainly adds some cost to the equation, but perhaps not enough to justify the $799 asking price. Yep, this puppy costs twice what you’ll pay for one of those budget Korean displays with the same screen size and resolution. I keep looking at the product page trying to figure out why.

Oh, right, Dell’s name is emblazoned on the bottom. Also, the U2713HM has some tree-hugger cred. Dell touts the monitor’s environmentally responsible packaging, giving folks something to talk about during the inevitable unboxing videos. The chassis is built from 25% recycled plastics, too, and the screen reportedly consumes 37% less power than the old UltraSharp U2711. That’s something, I suppose. Thanks to Engadget for the tip.

Comments closed
    • cynan
    • 7 years ago

    I think it’s kind of unfortunate to make a direct comparison (at least on price) between a product that you can buy through normal retail channels in North America, with full warranties vs one you can only get by ordering overseas primarily through private Ebay sellers (Microcenter not withstanding). With the Dell, you also get better QC assurance, fit and finish and a premium panel guarantee.

    Plus, everyone knows that Dell’s original MSRPs are often inflated. This will be $649 and probably more like $599 on a Dell’s Daily Deals within 6 months. The Dell U2711 was originally $999 (now $899), but you can regularly find sales on it for as low as $700-$750

    The headline reminds me a bit too much of the over-sensationalized journalism I’ve not been used to at TR, but see regularly from other sites I try to avoid.

    • ThorAxe
    • 7 years ago

    Looks like a step down from my U2711. Not sure why this one costs nearly as much.

    • anotherengineer
    • 7 years ago

    Well if it’s an 8-bit panel, with non-PWM controller backlighting, with a good OSD menu, less than 20ms of input lag and a 3-yr warranty with zero messed pixel warranty for $750 or less, consider it sold.

    edit: and with minimal edge light bleeding and uniform luminescence.

      • Parallax
      • 7 years ago

      I’m curious why you want an OSD. Everything except overdrive and brightness can be controlled through the video card or calibration, and the lack of an OSD is what brings down the input lag. At most you’d need what, maybe a hardware knob and one toggle button for those two functions?

        • XTF
        • 7 years ago

        Backlight brightness can be controlled through the videocard too, at least when it’s an Intel. Haven’t found that control in CCC yet.

    • omnomdinosaurs
    • 7 years ago

    So, 3 Dell U2412Ms for $837 (AUD), good or bad deal?

      • Laykun
      • 7 years ago

      They’re shit, they use 6bits per pixel and emulate 8bits through FRC. We got 5 of them at work and they have horrendous wavy patterns on screen with particular greys (the greys most commonly used by OSX’s window manager).

        • XTF
        • 7 years ago

        Hmm, sounds bad. Has that been confirmed by sites like tftcentral and prad?

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 7 years ago

    This panel is not the same as the Korean monitors. However, it would be nice to see Dell offer lower-end 27-inchers lacking a scalar and using eIPS LED displays for a small premium. I’d pay $500 for a nice matte Dell version with a zero dead pixel guarantee and proper customer support with a reliable warranty. I’d pay $550 if they boosted the refresh rate like people are doing with the Korean ones. These higher-end offerings still have a reason to exist though.

    • phileasfogg
    • 7 years ago

    This new display supports DP1.2. No one has commented about this yet, so allow me to add my $0.02.

    DP1.2 allows you to daisy-chain multiple displays. If Dell implemented this feature in the full spirit of the DP1.2 specification, then you can connect a second DP display (any resolution) to the U2713HM and drive both displays off a *single* DP connector on a graphics card which supports DP1.2. Or, you can connect the U2713HM to a DP1.2 hub, to which you can then connect multiple DP1.1 displays. So, you can think of the U2713 as the ‘root’ display and other displays connected to it (via the hub) as ‘leaf’ displays.

    DP1.2 is a big step up from DP1.1 in many ways. The most significant improvements are:
    a) max serial bitrate over 4x lanes of 21.6 Gbps (4 * 5.4) vs 10.8 (4 * 2.7) on DP1.1
    b) multi-stream transport (i.e. multiple A/V streams over a single DP connector)
    c) 3D Stereo display support. 1080p @ 120Hz per eye (left and right)

    AMD/ATI’s Radeon 7xxx GPUs and Nvidia’s Kepler GPUs all support DP1.2. And as far as I know, the newest Intel chipsets also support DP1.2.

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      Last time I saw that much DP in a description I was in the adult video store.

        • Bensam123
        • 7 years ago

        Good attempt Dea.

          • Bensam123
          • 7 years ago

          Weird how Deas post went from -2 to +4 and I went from 0 to -3 all in one night.

        • pedro
        • 7 years ago

        Haha, nice one.

      • XTF
      • 7 years ago

      Can DP transport USB? That’d save one cable for a lot of people.

        • Bensam123
        • 7 years ago

        I believe there is something like that in the spec. DP has auxilary channels that can be used for anything, but that depends entirely on the devices connected to each end.

          • XTF
          • 7 years ago

          Specs are nice, but where’s the hardware to support them? Seems like a missed opportunity.
          Speaking of DP, does anyone know why a lot of Samsung displays don’t support it?

            • Bensam123
            • 7 years ago

            Because it’s an auxiliary channel that can be used for anything, so it depends on the devices on each end… as I said in the post above.

    • Airmantharp
    • 7 years ago

    Is this thing 8-bit or 6-bit? I don’t see how it’s an improvement over the U2711 in any case, except for the questionable LED back-lighting. Will have to wait for reviews.

      • Flying Fox
      • 7 years ago

      Actually it is a downgrade if you look at U2711’s 10-bit colour and AdobeRGB support. However, sRGB support is actually better for most people.

        • Airmantharp
        • 7 years ago

        So it’s 8-bit? I’d prefer that, but I still wish Dell would get their input lag under control. They could at least include a setting to turn off all that crap and go all digital; it’s not like you want to use those settings over a real colorimeter anyway!

    • indeego
    • 7 years ago

    I believe this headline needs a rewrite.

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      Why?

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 7 years ago

        Dell’s new 27-inch IPS monitor doubles price of Korean imports

        The wording seems to be a misleading.

        The wording says Dell’s monitor doubles the price of Korean imports. The Dell monitor is twice the price of the Korean monitor. Dell’s monitor didn’t “double” the price, or the price of the Korean monitor would be the same price as the Dell’s. The Dell just costs “twice” as much. The headline does need to be rewritten to be more correct and less misleading.

        My interpretation may not be the same as everyone’s, though.

    • Anarchist
    • 7 years ago

    “Dell’s new 27-inch IPS monitor doubles price of Korean imports”

    and both are made in China.

    • Laykun
    • 7 years ago

    Assuming that the supply of panels to the Korean manufacturers continues and this golden age of IPS panels at bargain prices remains there appears to be one clear solution that Dell and similar manufacturers must take.

    These Korean monitors have proven one thing : consumers don’t give a shit about all the professional features, add-ons, On screen displays that get added to current monitors that jack the price up skyward and add input latency. The consumer wants a nice big beautiful panel with a wide gamut covering 95% AdobeRGB, IPS viewing angles, excellent dot pitch with 2560×1440 and zero input lag for gaming, which is exactly what the Korean monitors aim at.

    So Dell, remove all your superfluous garbage from your high end monitor and market it towards gamers/ordinary users at something people can actually afford. With a matte finish I’m sure you can throw an extra $50 on there just like apple does for it’s Macbook Pros.

      • Zoomer
      • 7 years ago

      Most of the price difference is in the panel rating. Can consumers put up with lower panel life, performance, uneven or excess backlight bleed, dead/stuck pixels, uneven/inferior color reproduction and all the other nasties of not using top binned panels?

        • Laykun
        • 7 years ago

        For an extra 100 USD for the Korean models you can get a pixel perfect display. This brings the price up to $350, I guarantee you that consumers would be absolutely fine with a slightly lower panel grade at that price point with a zero dead pixel guarantee.

        Remember, those higher binned displays are aimed at production professionals, much like Geforce Quadro GPUs. It might be an awful analogy but most users are fine with a GTX 680 as opposed to quadro equivalent at less that half the price because there are simply features they don’t want or need, and they don’t need a GPU that has a 10 year life span.

          • Airmantharp
          • 7 years ago

          I’m guessing most of the angst is centered on the lack of a good middle ground- either you have super-expensive S-IPS or low-end e-IPS that’s behind good TNs for everything but viewing angles.

          I’d certainly be interested in a pixel-perfect 30″ that could do 120Hz (DP can do it!), with a near-glossy coating instead of matte, zero input lag like my ZR30w, and a full 8-bit panel for consumer color work.

          Hell, I’d pay as much as I payed for my ZR30w to get it.

            • XTF
            • 7 years ago

            What e-IPS monitors are that bad? The Dells?
            I’d love to see > 60Hz IPS panels too, how hard can it be?

    • fredsnotdead
    • 7 years ago

    99% of sRGB is disappointing, it should be able to reproduce at least 95% of Adobe RGB to be useful for photo editing of RAW files (sRGB is fine if you only use jpeg or only use photos online).

      • fredsnotdead
      • 7 years ago

      Newegg now has the superior Dell U2711 on sale for $699 with free shipping: 96% of AdobeRGB and guaranteed no bright pixels.

        • Airmantharp
        • 7 years ago

        Better for color pros, worse for gaming :).

    • sschaem
    • 7 years ago

    All I can say is: Thats allot for a gaming monitor.

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    Don’t forget that the $400 from Korea already includes profit for the manufacturer, Korean tax, profit for the seller, and a not-exactly-cheap shipping halfway around the globe.

    As for green credentials, The Koreans win hands down (trans-continental shipping excepted). Dell cannot claim “greener” status if they’re discarding A- panels to go into landfill or incineration.

    G2G response of the Koreans is also better, at 6ms to the Dell’s 8ms.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 7 years ago

      And the Dell price includes profit for the manufacturer, profit for the seller (Dell), and shipping from Korea or China. So I’m not sure what your point is there.

      “Dell cannot claim “greener” status if they’re discarding A- panels to go into landfill or incineration.”

      And what if they let the Korean manufacturer sell them off on Ebay?

        • nanoflower
        • 7 years ago

        His point is that the manufacturer made a profit off the product (just like Dell did). They either sold the products to end users directly or to a another party (like a retail store or mail order store) for a profit(just like Dell does.) Then a third party (perhaps an end user like yourself) was able to buy the product in Korea and ship it overseas to an American customer while making an additional profit of some $$$. That last step doesn’t exist in the Dell equation or the price would be at least $100 more if an American consumer were buying these products to ship overseas to Korea. That would cover any sale tax, shipping costs and any profit for the consumer/seller.

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 7 years ago

          Dell doesn’t own the factories that make the their monitors. They’re contracting all that out. They are the 3rd party seller for all intents and purposes.

            • Bauxite
            • 7 years ago

            Not only that, but the major component in a lot of the dell (and many other) IPS monitors also comes from Korea

            Who is importing whom? 🙂

          • Chrispy_
          • 7 years ago

          This.

          The point in the purchase process at which you would buy the Dell is the same point at which the Korean reseller buys, say an an Achieva Q270-Lite. They don’t pay $400 for it, they probably pay $250 for it. The remaining $150 is likely split between shipping and profit for the Korean reseller.

          Like for like:
          It’s $800 for the Dell, Direct from Dell.
          It’s around $250 for the Achieva screen, direct from Achieva.

          What amazing is that it’s [i<]still[/i<] only half the price of a Dell after another middleman has added their own profit, it has been shipped about 8000 miles and then made it through customs and taxed by a second country's revenue system. Ludicrious, is what it is.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      I HIGHLY dount Dell discards “A- panels to go into landfill or incineration”…unless by landfill or incinerator you mean these smaller companies that package the panels and sell them in their own monitors.

        • Chrispy_
        • 7 years ago

        Okay, bad choice of word – in short I don’t really know what happens, I suspect Dell only buys A+ panels, which is amusing since of the Dell screens at work, there are a few dead pixels anway.

        Rather than “discarding”, I should probably have used the word “rejecting” or the phrase “refusing to buy”.

      • Flying Fox
      • 7 years ago

      G2G responses from different panel manufacturers cannot really be compared directly.

        • Bauxite
        • 7 years ago

        Most of the IPS panels in these 27″ dell/hps/apple/”korean” are from LG

        …which is in SK 😉

      • ludi
      • 7 years ago

      Uhm, the entire computer industry, or at least those portions dependent upon foundry-type fabrication methods, tends to have unavoidable variability in manufacturing. The final price structure is all about binning and selling things based on the level of quality demanded by the end user. Tier One vendors usually buy and resell a consistent quality of product based on fixed supply contracts, and that raises their overhead costs.

      As an example, suppose I produce a pan of cookies (do your people still call them biscuits?). There is a relatively fixed cost to the raw ingredients, the depreciation on the appliances, and the electricity. HOWEVER, those at the middle of the pan see the best heat distribution and tend to turn out perfect: Lightly crisp and browned on the outside, slightly chewy in the middle. As we get to the outer edges of the pan, there is more variability. If the average cost per batch is $7 and II end up with twenty cookies, and a raw division of cost/cookie says they were $0.35/each. I want at least a 5% margin in order to keep my employees and stockholders happy, so I need to make about $7.35 from selling this batch.

      Am I going to sell them at $0.37 each? Only if I’m an idiot, because my customers are going to get highly variable quality and those looking for a supply of higher-quality product will be relatively unhappy. So instead I “bin” the cookies by quality and sell them as follows:

      * Highest grade, 5 of 20: $0.60 each
      * Middle grade, 6 of 20: $0.45 each
      * Lowest grade, 7 of 20: $0.30 each
      * Indedible, 2 of 20: $0 (discard)

      Dell buys my highest-grade cookies under a fixed supply contract, adds frosting and sprinkles and a nice warranty, and sells to the higher-end market accordingly. Dell is happy, because they got a high-quality product. I’m happy, because I am guaranteed to recover 40% of the revenues I need to stay in business.

      Viewsonic comes along, offers to buy my middle-grade cookies, adds a coupon for a free glass of milk, and sells to the middle-end market accordingly. Viewsonic is happy, because they still got a decent quality product, and I’m happy, because 78% of my revenue is now covered using the best 55% of my production.

      Finally, I dump the remaining usable units into the spot market at bargain prices. If I sell at least 5, I can stay in business. If I sell all 7, I nicely exceed my target margins. I will probably meet my revenue goals, which makes me happy; and the resellers of the cheap units are happy, because they still get cookies at $0.30 where they would otherwise have none.

        • DrDillyBar
        • 7 years ago

        Ha! Well done.

    • Digex
    • 7 years ago

    Man we are getting screwed by Dell. No reason the Dell couldn’t be $399.

    • blastdoor
    • 7 years ago

    To me, the Dell logo is a major disadvantage. But if my only choice were between this and the cheap Korean ones, I’d buy this. Not only are the extra ports (particularly the USB hub) handy, the cheap Korean ones kind of look like cheap Korean ones. I’m sure someone will criticize me for picking something based on looks, but given that we’re talking about a display, that’s kind of an ironic criticism.

      • Chrispy_
      • 7 years ago

      No, I see where you’re coming from. But in my mind Dell’s look pretty cheap anyway, the exception being that cool aluminium-shelled ultrasharp from a few years back.

      I have my Achieva on a Herman-Miller Flo gas-lift arm. All I can see of monitor is the bezel which is matte plastic with a small logo and a discrete light. The arm cost me £100, which was more than half what the screen cost me, but I still total less than half the Dell price and I now have 10/10 ergonomics instead of some poxy desk stand that lets me raise it six extra inches.

    • Hsew
    • 7 years ago

    “…..doubles price of Korean imports”

    I see no price change. Please tell me I wasn’t the only one who read it that way.

      • Scrotos
      • 7 years ago

      [sound of crickets chirping]

      • druidcent
      • 7 years ago

      It’s grammatically correct, but slightly confusing.. the Dell monitor is double the price of the Korean ones.. not that Dell caused the doubling of the price of the Korean monitors

      • octagonalman
      • 7 years ago

      I found it unclear too. I would have preferred “…is double the price of…”. Is this usage widespread?

      • ImSpartacus
      • 7 years ago

      Yes, it’s very unclear. I, too, was expecting some weird price bump on those korean panels.

    • WaltC
    • 7 years ago

    Another good and useful tidbit about the price of these monitors coming down, down, down! Competition–savor it!

    Slightly off topic: I meant to include this in my post in the original story thread, but forgot. Does anyone remember the old “long-persistence” CRTs? The phosphor elements in the screen were designed to remain lit for a maximum of time even without direct stimulation from the guns. There were also “medium” and “short” persistence CRTs–that were ideal for high refresh rates and animation for the obvious reasons–and these made up the bulk of CRTs. This is an artifact from my ancient Amiga days, but supposedly the still-frame color fidelity and quality was “glorious” with a long persistence monitor…so I decided to buy one–and I got 17″ of long-persistence CRT rapture for a mere $900, IIRC, and…I’ve never been more disappointed by a monitor in my life…;)

    Ghosting was absolutely horrible–far worse than I imagined it would be based on the reviews I read. Worst I’ve ever seen before or since. Moving an open drawer around in Workbench left almost solid trails behind on the screen that would take several seconds to clear after you stopped moving the drawer (analogous to moving an open window in Windows.) You simply could not play any games with it–the ghosting transformed everything into a visual mess for anything that moved across the screen.

    Biggest disappointment though was the still-frame color quality. It sucked! The long-persistence phosphors gave the entire screen a greenish tint that remained even when running Deluxe Paint or any other program. It was visible even when the monitor was turned off. I *think* I got my money back, but I just don’t recall. Anyway, that is one of the things I recall whenever someone waxes nostalgic about the “good old days”…:D The good old days are happening right now, imo.

      • PenGun
      • 7 years ago

      My mighty 34″ Sony XS 955 is a thing of beauty. A CRT with 65% more lines in it’s aperture grill than a regular HDTV. Basically an XBR but cheaper.

      None of the LCDs I’ve seen are in it’s class. Games are a joy, although you need to set custom resolution because of overscan.

        • XTF
        • 7 years ago

        What resolutions does it support?

          • PenGun
          • 7 years ago

          The TV runs 1920X1080 .. standard HDMI. I run most games at somewhere around, I’m not in windows now, 1780×980 which lets me see the stuff around the edge.

    • Decelerate
    • 7 years ago

    I hope for Dell that Apple doesn’t release a 27-30″ monitor in the 3360×2100 range anytime soon. Even if it would cost more, it will steal the spotlight out of the AH-IPS.

    Aside from that:
    Like:
    -Inputs
    -Specs
    -Fully adjustable
    -Rear of the stand (the aluminum color is distinctive imo)
    -Button placement (having a U2412, it grew on me)

    Dislike:
    -Price (needs to be in the 549 range, maybe it will be after discounts)
    -Stand (I miss the crow foot, was the classiest stand imo)

    • internetsandman
    • 7 years ago

    And yet nobody apart from those Korean manufacturers can make a relatively affordable monitor with greater than HD resolution. Hell, I’ve seen Asus charge 500-600 bucks for 1920×1200 24″ panels

    • MadManOriginal
    • 7 years ago

    The Dell has a 3 year advanced exchange warranty. There is an OSD with meaningful adjustments that work in addition to the points others have made. It will undoubtedly go on sale from the $799 MSRP as well. It’s good there are choices but this is not directly comparable to the bare minimum Korean monitors.

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      Ya, I can see this going on sale for $500. When it does, it would be worth the $100 premium.

      • Goty
      • 7 years ago

      To be fair about the OSD, the monitor I bought this weekend had a fully functional OSD with brightness, contrast and color controls.

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      The Dell monitors are better, but if more people knew about the Korean alternatives, Dell would have some major competition. Even with everything you mentioned, I don’t think that justifies an extra $400.

      Bottom line is that seeing some harsh competition in the monitor game would be most excellent for consumers.

      • lilbuddhaman
      • 7 years ago

      I thought Dell ‘stopped doing sales’ years ago ?

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        Haven’t looked at their online store for years I guess.

    • Goty
    • 7 years ago

    AH-IPS vs e-IPS: there’s your cost difference. A bit of it is the Dell name, but it’s mainly the panel. The Korean monitors are nice compared to cheap TN panels (I just picked up a 27″ Auria from Microcenter this weekend), but they don’t hold a candle to good IPS panels.

      • DeadOfKnight
      • 7 years ago

      Wrong.

      • glacius555
      • 7 years ago

      Are Korean IPS panels that much worse compared to this new product? TR, what do you guys reckon? 😉

      • tay
      • 7 years ago

      Damn the microcenter monitor is tempting though….

        • Goty
        • 7 years ago

        It’s not a bad monitor by an stretch and it’s definitely worth the money. With a little calibration, the picture is excellent.

      • burntham77
      • 7 years ago

      I’ve been weighing the pros and cons of that 27 inch Auria monitor and a Dell 3007WFP 30 inch LCD. Granted, the price on the Dell is high, but it’s tough to beat the features and quality.

        • cynan
        • 7 years ago

        Features on a 3007WFP? Are you sure you’ve got the right monitor? It’s only got a single Dual link DVI port and not even OSD. Maybe your’re referring to the USB hub and SD card reader?

      • Parallax
      • 7 years ago

      The Korean models I’ve seen (and own) use 8-bit S-IPS panels, not the inferior 6-bit e-IPS.

        • drfish
        • 7 years ago

        Give that man a cookie!

        • Damage
        • 7 years ago

        Yeah, Goty needs some down-votes for spreading misinformation.

          • glacius555
          • 7 years ago

          Done!

      • druidcent
      • 7 years ago

      The Korean Monitor that I’ve got has an 8bit S-IPS panel..

      • Chrispy_
      • 7 years ago

      e-IPS? Nope.

      Almost all the korean imports (Achieva, Catleap, etc) use the LG S-IPS panels identical to your thousand-buck Apple Thunderbolt display. Trying to defend Dell is commendable but you need to get your facts right.

        • Visigoth
        • 7 years ago

        Well f*cking said. Say what you want about the Korean displays, but do not spread FUD or misinformation on their excellent displays.

      • Goty
      • 7 years ago

      Reply to my own post since everyone thinks they’re contributing by saying the same thing over and over again.

      1) Is gradient banding on 8-bit panels normally as bad as I’ve seen on my buddy’s Yamasaki monitor? If so, outside of color reproduction (not particularly important to most), what’s the benefit?

      2) Fine, modify my argument from “AH-IPS vs e-IPS” to “AH-IPS vs S-IPS”. =P
      S-IPS still isn’t exactly the gold standard of IPS panels, unlike AH-IPS.

        • Parallax
        • 7 years ago

        1) Gradient banding should not be any worse than other 8-bit displays. Calibrating, adjusting the OSD colors, and adjusting the video card options can cause banding, especially if you use more than one. A good panel coating (i.e. not matte) is needed to easily see all the 8-bit values, as a grainy coating can obscure subtleties. The industry really needs to move to 12-bit color and be done with it.

        2) I have yet to see any independently-measured improvement of AH-IPS. Probably the best panel for wide viewing angles, the one used in the NEC 2090wuxi years ago, is an S-IPS with an A-TW polarizer that eliminates the distracting white-glow present an all the new panels.

    • kroker
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]Yep, this puppy costs twice what you'll pay for one of those budget Korean displays with the same screen size and resolution. I keep looking at the product page trying to figure out why. Oh, right, Dell's name is emblazoned on the bottom.[/quote<] The better build quality, scaler, extra inputs, USB, 3-year warranty and the fact that it doesn't use an A- IPS panel probably have something to do with that too.

      • Bauxite
      • 7 years ago

      Scaler is a negative bullet point for many users who only drive native and let the GPU handle non-native scaling. (they’re way better at it anyways)

      Its nice in theory that you can plug in a blu-ray or console to your PC monitor and it fills up the screen, but when it costs you extra response time even with 1:1 PC inputs, no thanks. (rather plug those into a big TV thats native 1080p anyways)

        • kroker
        • 7 years ago

        I’m not disagreeing with you, but it does add up cost. And since we’re talking about negative bullet points to users, I and many others would also like a less aggressive matte coating, but these are business monitors, we’re not the targeted demographic, and that is my point – you can’t compare a business-class monitor to a bare-bones cheaply built korean monitor with a discounted second-grade IPS panel.

          • Squeazle
          • 7 years ago

          …business class should be less expensive, not more. Admittedly, you really can’t source a questionable product, definitely not off ebay, but Dell is selling their name for the same price as the monitor itself apparently costs.

      • maxxcool
      • 7 years ago

      Scaler = devil

        • HisDivineOrder
        • 7 years ago

        Scaler = devil’s punishment from God for the whole “Trying to take over Heaven” thing.

        He put a scaler on the Devil’s PC monitor and now when he games, he’s always getting shot in the face because of the lag. God works in mysterious (and devious) ways.

        Friends don’t let friends game on monitors with scalers.

      • XTF
      • 7 years ago

      Lots of people would be fine without extra inputs, scalers and USB3. Especially if it’d reduce costs.
      Even no HDCP might be fine, I don’t want to support Digital Restrictions Management.
      OSD is hardly needed too. :p

    • DarkUltra
    • 7 years ago

    What is the max refresh rate of this monitor? I prefer anti-glare coating but there are overclockable 120hz korean monitors out there, overlordcomputer.com and 120hz.net.

    8ms is still within 120hz timings, but would look rather smeared and non-solid compared to the korean 6ms and especially 3ms 3d monitors.

    [url<]http://jooh.no/index.php/2012/06/17/120hz-monitor-refresh-rate/[/url<]

      • Spotpuff
      • 7 years ago

      The response rate is usually grey to grey so I don’t think it can really be translated into a refresh rate like that.

      It also doesn’t look like dual link DVI has the bandwidth to carry 120Hz at the resolution these panels are at; see [url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Visual_Interface#Digital[/url<] I could be wrong. I thought displayport and HDMI both outpace DVI in terms of available frequency/resolution.

        • Parallax
        • 7 years ago

        Dual-link DVI has no upper bandwidth limit in its specifications. People assume it’s 2x single-link DVI, but it’s not.

        Displayport 1.2 has more bandwidth than 2x single-link DVI, but many video cards 2-3 generations old only support the slower DP 1.1.

        HDMI still requires royalty fees (correct me if I’m wrong), and there are no implementations of the versions with better than single-link DVI bandwidth.

          • Krogoth
          • 7 years ago

          Dual-link DVI has twice the bandwidth of a single-link DVI. It maximum transmission speed is 330Mhz and the spec can technically handle 48 bits, but standard resolutions are at 24bits which means that dual-link at 330Mhz/24bit only yields 9.9Gbits of bandwidth (FYI, DVI uses 8b/10bit encoding) which is effectively twice the bandwidth of a single-link DVI connection.

            • XTF
            • 7 years ago

            Where exactly do you get the 330Mhz from? AFAIK the spec only says above 165Mhz pixel clock, dual-link should be used. It doesn’t say dual-link stops at 330Mhz.

            • Bensam123
            • 7 years ago

            Yup, I had this argument before and people laughed at me when I pointed it out.

            Graphics cards and the monitors discern the maximum for DL-DVI. Basically the spec is retroactive and doesn’t have a hard limit set in place like HDMI and DP.

      • Bensam123
      • 7 years ago

      There is no magical number for connecting refresh rate with response rate. They’re independent of each other.

    • Sargent Duck
    • 7 years ago

    That, and the buttons (or on-screen display) probably works right out of the box.

    Just remember the age-old adage. You get what you pay for…

      • drfish
      • 7 years ago

      Yep, I got 3,686,400 very nice looking pixels for $300 – and that’s all I need. 🙂

        • indeego
        • 7 years ago

        I’m sure you’ll update up in a year with the display working flawlessly. There are people all over the web with issues with these monitors.

        I understand the appeal, many of us don’t have the time to deal with hassle.

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 7 years ago

      “You get what you pay for,” is not an adage I’d say frequently suits what Dell gives you with their higher cost items. At least, not usually these days…

        • Airmantharp
        • 7 years ago

        Their monitors are worth exactly what you pay for- if you need what they offer. Most don’t, particularly gamers.

        Dell’s top-end IPS monitors are for color professionals and are regularly reviewed to be barely suitable to unsuitable for gaming due to input lag; this due to the scalers supporting various non-native inputs as well as their very nice OSDs.

        I typically push HP for gamers due to the lack of input lag, and they’re usually cheaper for the same LG panel, but retain the phenomenal build quality and at least present customer service.

    • pedro
    • 7 years ago

    Who’s plugging VGA into this rudeboy? I mean seriously – why do companies keep going with the VGA?

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      A lot of portables (and other devices that use vga out) in use still do not have HDMI/DVI/DP out but do have a VGA out. As long as they are not sacrificing other connections for the sake of a VGA port, I do not see what the fuss is about.

        • internetsandman
        • 7 years ago

        I think that just adds another question: why do none of these devices have a digital output at this point?

          • Deanjo
          • 7 years ago

          Most newer devices do have that connectability but it does not exclude it being used with older devices such as older Atom netbooks and such that do not have anything but VGA out. Besides, speaking from a tech point of view, you can never have to many options for inputs. You also have to remember that there are cases in the corporate world where a user may get a new monitor but may have a older machine that is expected to last them a few more years.

          • burntham77
          • 7 years ago

          HDMI is fairly standard these days. Even a lot of tablets at least get a mini HDMI.

            • Mourmain
            • 7 years ago

            That’s not true, and that is the problem: none of the other display standards are as widespread as VGA. There is DVI which started off well, but began to be replaced by HDMI, which is now being replaced by DisplayPort before it even reached full ripeness.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 7 years ago

        Why are you buying a 27″ monitor that will look awful driven from VGA for your old laptop?

          • Deanjo
          • 7 years ago

          Did you ever consider that it is not the only machine hooked up to the display? Even if it does look “awful” compared to DVI/HDMI etc chances are that it will still look better then their previous display with VGA hookup. Not only that but a lot of business class machines (cough Dell) come with one dvi and one vga port and is the only way to go dual display without replacing the video card.

            • demani
            • 7 years ago

            Yeah- I like having a VGA so I can plug in a cheap KVM and use it to monitor things like the backup server or a drive utility machine (one machine I just use for mass drive reformatting). VGA, even scaled, just means that I only need one monitor on my desk. I do wish more monitor manufacturers would make the units full KVM switches-I think Mitsubishi used to have some that when you switched the monitor input it also switched the USB input (it had dual USB inputs). Great idea. Really needs to catch on.

      • DrDillyBar
      • 7 years ago

      I’d plug my server into the VGA. That’s all it has.

        • BIF
        • 7 years ago

        My brand new HP Elitebook corporate laptop has ONLY a VGA port. So when in a conference room, there needs to be a VGA cable laying on the table or I can’t display my screen on the big overhead.

        When docked, I have VGA, DVI, and Displayport. The laptop has an AMD card, so 3-monitor Eyefinity is available…but only when docked.

          • Visigoth
          • 7 years ago

          That’s a fault with your HP notebook. Tell HP to nix VGA.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            You go and tell every boardroom to get a projector that takes hdmi/Displayport.

            • XTF
            • 7 years ago

            A DVI-I -> VGA dongle would work fine if the laptop has a DVI-I port.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            You won’t find too many laptops sporting DVI ports without a dock. The connector is just too bulky.

            • demani
            • 7 years ago

            That is the benefit of the miniDisplayport – I know a lot of people have a beef since it was an Apple pushed standard (well, was proprietary at first but Apple pushed for it to be a real standard) but it has a lot of bandwidth, plus is super tiny. Just wish it were keyed better-it is still too easy to plug a cable in upside down.

      • shaurz
      • 7 years ago

      So you can plug your Dreamcast in to it, silly 😉

      • Flying Fox
      • 7 years ago

      Actually it is also missing the component and composite inputs from the 2711. Dell Ultrasharp’s usually do scaling on that too.

        • Zoomer
        • 7 years ago

        Component to vga. 😉

      • d0g_p00p
      • 7 years ago

      A lot of laptops still come with VGA (for some unknown reason) I am guessing it’s compatibility for mobile users.

      Edit: I should read the comments before I post my comments, lol.

      • texaszman
      • 7 years ago

      Instead of the Korean monitors – check out this Auria 27 inch WQHD at MicroCenter for $399 with one year warranty.

      I own a new Samsung SA850 27 inch ($820) that is also 2560×1440 and I have to say this Auria gives it a BIG run for the money. Not as well built, but less than 1/2 the price! No dead pixels, no problems of any kind setting it up and the white balance actually better than my Samsung. Very Happy!

      Long thread on hardocp forum on this as well. (Sorry for cross posting to other sites) [url<]http://hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1694047[/url<]

    • shaurz
    • 7 years ago

    But those cheapo Korean knock-offs didn’t have all the input options (DisplayPort, DVI-D, HDMI) and USB hub. I doubt the overall quality holds up either.

      • druidcent
      • 7 years ago

      Take a look at some of the options.. a few variants actually do have all the inputs.. they are about $50-100 more expensive than the base models..

        • Bauxite
        • 7 years ago

        Why buy one when you can have two for the same price:

        [url<]http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml?product_id=0384780[/url<]

          • SkyWarrior
          • 7 years ago

          Not to offend you but this design of this monitor looks totally s**t.

            • demani
            • 7 years ago

            Just got one. It totally isn’t. Well, the screen part isn’t (no love for the ID of the whole thing, but I can fix that myself for the amount I saved).

    • Mourmain
    • 7 years ago

    I like how TR are putting pressure on big name manufacturers to match the Korean monitors.

    Well done TR, and I’m all for it. Let the monitor wars begin!

      • internetsandman
      • 7 years ago

      It’s about time. Judging from the article they did on those Korean panels, there’s nothing the Dell has to justify being 500 bucks more expensive

    • derFunkenstein
    • 7 years ago

    Don’t the Korean displays not support HDCP? Is that a big deal if you’re not watching Blu Ray movies?

      • Captain Ned
      • 7 years ago

      If I’m buying a 27″ you damn well better believe I want HDCP, otherwise what’s the bloody point?

        • internetsandman
        • 7 years ago

        Certainly not gaming, or photoshop, or any media manipulation and creation for that matter. There’s no benefits to multitasking as far as I’m aware, and since there’s no possible way to watch a movie on anything other than an HDCP supported monitor, you’re right, why on earth would anyone want a larger monitor without it?

      • Bauxite
      • 7 years ago

      The microcenter $399 one does support HDCP, also has displayport (description is wrong)

      • maxxcool
      • 7 years ago

      No HDCP required for my rips ;), in fact I’d rather NOT buy a HDCP enabled monitor to make it more costly to manufacturers.

        • Captain Ned
        • 7 years ago

        Some of us actually buy our content legitimately.

          • heinsj24
          • 7 years ago

          Last I checked it was perfectly legal to buy a DVD (or BR), rip it into a video file, and store the disc.

          As an added bonus the physical disc usually costs less than digital media, too.

            • sotti
            • 7 years ago

            Actually it’s not.

            To rip a DVD you need to bypass the copy protection and circumventing that copy protection violates the DMCA.

            Call your senator and tell them to repeal that stupid thing.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            Preach it, brother sotti.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            You assume that everyone lives in the States.

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          and not everyone lives in the USA. Thank God.

            • Airmantharp
            • 7 years ago

            But remember that everyone’s lives would be much worse if we weren’t here! Hell, you guys up in the frozen north just get to chillax on the world stage because we take care of everything :-p

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            Everyones lives could be much better as well.

            • Airmantharp
            • 7 years ago

            Oh true that. I’m really just picking on SSK.

            • cynan
            • 7 years ago

            Or make a mess of everything at the expense of allegedly maintaining “free” access to oil and keeping defense contractors’ pockets lined, etc. Depends on your perspective (and whose propaganda you choose to believe). (BTW, where’re the tongue-in-cheek tags? :-D)

            At least your military is keeping those crazy North Koreans at bay for us though…

          • paulWTAMU
          • 7 years ago

          Including me. I just watch it on a 50″ HDTV instead of a 27″ monitor.

      • Kurotetsu
      • 7 years ago

      Wrong.

      The Korean display that TR bought does not support HDCP. Other models do (like the ACHIEVA Shimian QH270-Lite, the most popular model and the one that got the Korean import monitor craze going)

      EDIT:

      In fact, I think the monitor that TR bought is the ONLY Korean model I’ve seen that isn’t HDCP compliant…

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]Wrong.[/quote<] Wow, no reason to be a dick. I was asking a question.

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          I don’t think he was trying to be a dick. just came off that way.

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          anymore double posts and i’m going to kill myself irl. seriously.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            Double trouble?

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            man, this site broke something in opera….

            • JohnC
            • 7 years ago

            Use a proper browser 😉

            • Zoomer
            • 7 years ago

            Works fine for me.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            Must be the widows version because everything is A OK here in opera.

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 7 years ago

            just one more, just one more…

          • XTF
          • 7 years ago

          You weren’t just asking a (neutral) question. You were assuming it didn’t support it and asking a very suggestive question. And you were wrong with that assumption.

          • Kurotetsu
          • 7 years ago

          I apologize. I’ve been seeing alot of misinformation about the Korean models floating around and I got more annoyed than I should’ve.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            Are you Korean?

            • Kurotetsu
            • 7 years ago

            I am not. I am, however, something of a monitorphile (is that even a word?)

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            Videophile.

            • BIF
            • 7 years ago

            Yes, it is a word. If not yesterday, then it is today because you used it in an understandable context.

            Video is commonly taken to mean “motion video”, although it technically might not be. Video can also be taken to mean end-to-end video recording, storage, playback, viewing, and all points in between.

            As you say, you are an enthusiast who’s enthusiasm specializes in the monitor end of things. I think “monitorphile” is appropriately descriptive.

            Now…how to reconcile that with “monitor speakers”, which we who use DAWs commonly call “monitors”. Monitors for the eyes versus monitors for the ears. 😀

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 7 years ago

            screenophile

            edit: how do I get voted down for this? I mean come on!

      • Bensam123
      • 7 years ago

      Depends on the device. There is more then one monitor company making monitors based off of the panels everyone is talking about. The one that was tested by TR didn’t have HDCP, that isn’t the same for all of them.

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