Wednesday Shortbread

Eight is Enough

  1. Yahoo! Finance: Berkshire Hathaway liquidates stake in Intel over quarter
  2. Bloomberg: MKM Partner’s Daniel Berenbaum reiterates sell rating on AMD (video)
  3. Yahoo Finance!: Newegg visits more than 100

    schools during its 2012 college campus tour

  4. Nvidia: Yields of Kepler graphics processors

    are improving, supply situations getting easier

  5. techPowerUp!: AMD updates Radeon HD 7950 to thwart GeForce GTX 660 Ti
  6. AppleInsider: Apple’s newly-patented in-cell

    touchscreen tech could be bound for next-gen iPhone

  7. GNOME 3.5.5 impressions
  8. Bethesda Blog: PC system requirements for Dishonored


Wednesday

  1. KitGuru’s exclusive: Intel refutes Nvidia claims regarding HD 4000 game compatibility
  2. Fudzilla: HIS announces HD 7970 X graphics card
  3. Hardware Secrets interviews Magnus Huber, Arctic’s managing director
  4. Fudzilla: Hackers could destroy Curiosity
  5. Newegg’s super software spotlights
  6. Dealzon’s deals: $239 off 13.3″ Dell XPS 13 i5-2467M / 256GB SSD,

    $50 coupon for Dell XPS 8500 i7-3770 PC, $50 coupon for Alienware

    X51 PC, and $40 off 90GB Kingston SSDNow V+200 SSD

Mobile

  1. Fudzilla: Dell and Lenovo added to Microsoft’s list
  2. TechCrunch: Android is winning

Software and gaming

  1. Phoronix: Ubuntu 12.10 is faster with Intel hardware
  2. H Online: Calligra 2.5 released
  3. MCV: EA is well-positioned for next-gen success, analysts believe
  4. Kotaku reports Half-Life 3 will not be shown at GamesCom
  5. Guild Wars 2 stress test today, 8/15
  6. Kotaku has has 7 minutes of Remember Me footage (thanks Neutronbeam)
  7. Diablo III free Starter Edition now available
  8. Major Nelson: Madden NFL 13 demo
  9. Rage3D’s Sleeping Dogs PC technical review
  10. Techgage’s Knocking on Death’s Door: Darksiders II review
  11. HT4U and Technic3D review Diablo III (both in German)

Systems, storage, and networking

  1. RealWorldTech: ARM goes 64-bit
  2. Techreaction reviews Giada I35G (Atom D2500-based)

    MiniPC and Gigabyte Z77X-UD5H

  3. Futurelooks reviews 8GB Patriot Memory

    Viper III DDR3 2133MHz dual-channel kit

  4. ocaholic reviews 8GB Crucial Ballistix Smart

    Tactical DDR3 1866MHz CL9 dual-channel kit

  5. TweakTown revisits 256GB MyDigitalSSD

    BP3 mSATA SSD – 3.2 firmware update

  6. Hardware Secrets: How do you organize the cables

    and networking equipment from your computer?

Multimedia

  1. TweakTown reviews Sapphire HD 7970 GHz Edition Vapor-X 3GB
  2. techPowerUp!: AMD HD 7950 Boost Clock BIOS update
  3. PC Perspective reviews Galaxy GeForce GTX 670 GC 4GB
  4. Guru3D’s MSI Radeon HD 7770 Power Edition review
  5. Tbreak’s quick look at the AOC E2251FWU USB monitor
  6. TWL reviews Genius G-Shot HD575T digital camcorder
  7. Tbreak’s quick look at the Sony VPL-SW525C projector
  8. TechReviewSource on Canon Pixma Pro-1 photo printer
  9. KitGuru’s Arctic MC101-A10 Home Entertainment Centre review
  10. Benchmark Reviews on G-Cube iHL-500BK luxury dual-mode headset
  11. HardwareLook reviews CM Storm Sonuz headset
  12. Hardware.Info reviews LG LSM-100 mouse scanner

Cases and cooling

  1. Legit Reviews on Cooler Master Storm Stryker case
  2. ThinkComputers reviews Diablotek Cyclops case
  3. HardwareLook reviews Aerocool Touch-2000 fan controller
  4. Hi Tech Legion reviews Lepa’s 120mm Vortex / Casino / Chopper fans
Comments closed
    • sweatshopking
    • 7 years ago

    [i<] [b<] WTF?!?!?!?!? [/i<] [/b<] A 5850/460 MINIMUM FOR DISHONORED??!?!! THAT GAME LOOKS 7 YEARS OLD!!!!

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 7 years ago

    V.techPowerUp!: AMD updates Radeon HD 7950 to thwart GeForce GTX 660 Ti

    [quote<]The company released a new BIOS ROM image file which works on all AMD reference design Radeon HD 7950 graphics cards, which implements the new specifications. The new specifications sees the GPU core frequency increased to 850 MHz (from 800 MHz), and introduces PowerTune with Boost, which sends the GPU clock speed up to 925 MHz, when applications demand it. The memory frequency stays unchanged, at 1250 MHz, and so do the physical specifications of the GPU, such as stream processor, TMU, and ROP counts. All Radeon HD 7950 graphics cards manufactured from mid-August will feature the new specifications, prices will remain unchanged.[/quote<] Cool, now drop prices to 300 and sold.

    • blastdoor
    • 7 years ago

    “TechCrunch: Android is winning”

    Hmmm… I wonder what that means. From the article, it looks like it means that the latest Gartner estimates show total Android sales are about three times iPhone sales.

    Ok, fair enough, if that’s the definition of “winning”, then I guess Android is winning.

    But then the author leaps to a totally unfounded conclusion:

    “The old mantra of releasing on iOS and then eventually hitting Android needs to be rethought.”

    Not so fast, fanboy. Developers making money is a whole other ballgame. First, you have to look at a different unit count — now you have to include all iOS devices, not just iPhones. So add in iPod Touch and iPad (now you’re at 98 million Android vs. about 60 million iOS for the last quarter). Second, you have to look a the extent to which owners of these devices actually buy and use apps. oopsies… game over for Android. Android is the land of app piracy, splintered marketplaces, and people who believe software should be free — not to mention a big pile of “smart” phones that never actually are used that way.

    So no… the old mantra does not need to be rethought at all. At least not in the minds of developers who like making money.

      • BabelHuber
      • 7 years ago

      I’ve never had an issue with finding an Android App I needed – everything was right there in the Play Store – always!

      So if it stays the way it is, I’m fine.

      Besides, the gap between Android and iOS will widen as long as more Android handsets as iOS-devices are sold, so it gets only worse for Apple as long as this trend continues.

      Example starting at zero:

      Q1: 60/98 (your numbers)
      Q2: 120/ 196
      Q3: 180/ 294
      Q4: 240/ 392

      • mcnabney
      • 7 years ago

      I found out recently that “App Piracy” on Android will include downloading the same app to more than one device – which is allowed with Android. So when I bought Angry Birds on my smartphone I also downloaded it to my two tablets. The piracy calculator would tag that as 1 purchase and 2 acts of piracy because they are installs on devices not used for purchase. So until they fix their ‘logic’ these ludicrously high piracy numbers can be safely ignored.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        pretty sure that’s not accurate. ALL app stores allow a number of devices, and that would not be included under piracy. what IS included is the 90% of people searching for “angry birds android” and getting one of the top google links for downloading the apk. in fact, anecdotally, i’m the only person I know who actually uses the play store. everyone else I know with android (uni students, coworkers, etc.) just downloads apks. it’s quick, it’s easy, and it’s free.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        [citation needed]

      • codedivine
      • 7 years ago

      Hmm 60 million iOS devices sold is incorrect. Last quarter, Apple sold 26 million iPhones, 17 million iPads and 4 million iPods. Even assuming all the iPods sold were touches (an unlikely estimate), then you get upto 47 million devices, more likely 45 million.

      Secondly, paid apps or even ad-supported apps are not the only business models. There are companies that sell services (Dropbox) or content (Kindle) or are about services in the real-world (banking). For all of these, making sure their app works on the most popular platform makes a lot of sense. They are not trying to “sell” an app, they are selling a well-monetized service and the apps are free.

      For ad-supported apps, I believe Android leads anyway (though I may be wrong there).

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        Android generates less money in those add supported apps though. iOS makes 6 times as much, from what I’ve read.

        Honestly, I don’t know why anyone would bother with android. as a user, or as a developer. All I ever hear is about how horrible it is to develop for, how much time must be spent on every different device and OS, about how it’s so full of piracy, how it crashes so much (god knows mine does), etc. I get the “it’s open” line, but really, how many people ACTUALLY care? some nerds do, and even I can appreciate some of that. But when I compare it to iOS even, it just falls short. I get that maybe you like hardware keyboards, and apple doesn’t make one, but really, it’s just not that great. I haven’t tried jellybean, but with android all I hear is “the next version will fix it!” (kinda like windows phone, only windows phone is at least efficient). I just don’t understand why it’s selling like it is.

          • dashbarron
          • 7 years ago

          I’ve used both extensively and Android (4.0+) is a huge breath of fresh air compared to iOS. I get that a lot of people want simple. But for any businessman, techie, special-applications person, or anyone else who wants to try and do something ever-so-slightly outside of the box, Apple and their hardware choices are out of the question.

          And if you’re going on mummers and rumors, you probably don’t hear people complain about iOS because they are RDFed to death and/or don’t know better.

          • BabelHuber
          • 7 years ago

          Honsetly, how do you manage your Android phone to crash?

          I’ve heard that complaint very often, but I have no first-hand-experience (running SGS2 with Supernexus ROM Android 4.11)

          For ‘falling short’ to iOS:

          My car supports rSAP for its built-in phone. If your phone does not support rSAP, you can use the car as UI and use your phone to handle the phone calls itself (this is called handsfree).

          So, iOS does not support rSAP, neither does Android.

          But with Android, you can root your phone and install an rSAP App. Voilá, the car’s built-in phone can be used now.

          With iOS, your stuck with handsfree, since there is no way in hell you can get rSAP to work. Even my old Nokia X6 Symbian phone supported rSAP, BTW (of course the new WP Nokias don’t).

          • derFunkenstein
          • 7 years ago

          OK I know for sure you have a Windows 7 phone – how are you using Android?

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            i have a tablet. had it forever.

            • lilbuddhaman
            • 7 years ago

            Tablets…forever?

          • PixelArmy
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<]I just don't understand why it's selling like it is.[/quote<] Perhaps you've mischaracterized the smartphone (and/or android) user based on developer friends or the media? The end user doesn't care how hard it is to develop for the different versions. The media has to single stuff out that "the next version will fix" cause they have to write about something. I am not saying it is perfect, but you paint it as not usable... at all... Here are my guesses based on my anecdotal evidence... Most people care mainly about email, web browsing, messaging, facebook/twitter, camera. They also really do like bigger screens (maybe just not galaxy note sized) cause it makes all of the above easier. And they do use app stores (google play or amazon), but don't really care all that much about apps save for a few specific ones that get ported anyways. Most people don't even know what rooting is! Or sideloading! Battery is fine if it lasts the day with moderate use (very few people are actually on their phone all day). Being open is a plus, but way down the list of things people care about. My cheap-ass single core 2.3.x running phone does all this (without constant crashing, only Dolphin really crashes consistently, though it does get used more). The basic android phone still running gingerbread were/are ok for most and newer phones are obviously even better.

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 7 years ago

          Cheaper than an iPhone, not Apple, not Microsoft, Google has it’s own following, openness, more and better apps than WP, huge ecosystem, integration with google services.

          Those are the major reasons I would see a consumer buying an Android device, I’m sure I missed a lot.

      • PixelArmy
      • 7 years ago

      In addition to inflating iOS numbers, also neglects to add Android tablets and media players since Android phones alone are 98 million. A low estimate would add about 5 million tablets (don’t know where Android media players are counted). Trivial maybe, but let’s at least try to be honest…

      Splintered marketplaces may payout different rates, but they’re still making money. I’d venture to say an overwhelming % is via google play and amazon anyways.

      I’ll also play devil’s advocate and say those people pirating wouldn’t have bought anyways 🙂

      All that said, it may still be more beneficial economically to develop for iOS first… Selling to those users = shut up and take their money.

    • blastdoor
    • 7 years ago

    grr…. double post 🙁

    • blastdoor
    • 7 years ago

    “Yahoo! Finance: Berkshire Hathaway liquidates stake in Intel over quarter”

    My impression is that Buffet has never claimed to really understand tech at all, and prefers investing in old school stuff like railroads and coca-cola. But still… not exactly the kind of endorsement Intel is looking for, I’m sure.

    Personally, I think BH made the right call. Certainly Intel is not “dead” (sensationalist tech writers only know a few adjectives, and they’re all words like “dead” or “dominant”), but Intel’s prospects for profit *growth* don’t look that great. The traditional PC is stagnant so no room to grow there. Mobile is the future, but even if Intel ends up carving out a slice of that market, they won’t do so with 60% margins. ARM!=AMD. Intel will really have to fight hard to eke out lower profit margins in the mobile space.

      • grantmeaname
      • 7 years ago

      You’ve got it backwards. BRK is interested in owning large, stable, even stagnant companies and then capturing the dividends from them. They own much of P&G and Coca-Cola, for example, companies without huge growth prospects. By owning them in part, BRK manages to avoid dividend taxes and reinvest their dividends elsewhere.

      Unlike P&G, Intel has better things to do with its money than pay dividends, like build fabs and do really far-out research like what led to Larrabee and its Tri-gate transistors.That just makes it a poor fit for the BRK business model.

        • chuckula
        • 7 years ago

        Intel does pay dividends, but not as generous as P&G and Coke though. Walmart also pays pretty generous dividends.

          • grantmeaname
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<]Intel does pay dividends, but not as generous as P&G and Coke though[/quote<] Right, which is why BRK is redistributing their capital elsewhere. Which is what I said.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            Wrong. Current yields: Intel and P&G: 3.4%, Coca Cola: 1.3%.

    • Mourmain
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]KitGuru's exclusive: Intel refutes Nvidia claims regarding HD 4000 game compatibility [/quote<] Unless I missed the second page of that article, there's no refuting in there. Intel just waxes poetic about the aesthetic qualities of the HD4000. They show no hard numbers or tests. Waste of time. Which is a pity, because the HD4000 could probably do pretty well with some numbers.

      • can-a-tuna
      • 7 years ago

      AMD should sue Intel for using “HDx000” brand.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        Seems to work for Apple with their black brick smartphones and green olde-timey phone icons.

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          YOU THINK A GREEN PHONE JUST COMES OUT OF NOWHERE??!?!?! THAT’S [i<] INNOVATION [/i<]

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            The “call” button on my circa-2001 Nokia (my first cell phone…*sniffle*) was green.

            edit: btw, I know you’re being sarcastic. I’m just so galled at this Apple/Samsung lawsuit.

    • Mourmain
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]Fudzilla: Hackers could destroy Curiosity [/quote<] That article was pulled out of Nick Farrell's sunday reporter backside. He has absolutely no support for his statement except this inane conclusion: "The fact that NASA’s Curiosity rover is currently getting a firmware upgrade is being seen as proof that the entire project is a doddle to hack". But he gets to write an article about it.

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      Nick is just another hack ‘journalist’ that tries to make his own news and relies on sensationalism to get people to read his drivel.

      • blastdoor
      • 7 years ago

      Gotta give him credit, though — writing stories about things that “could” happen is a good way to ensure steady employment, if people are dumb enough to read.

      “terrorists could take over the empire state building!”
      “gasoline could be set on fire!”
      “the president could have an affair with Beyonce!”
      “mitt romney could be gay!”

      there are SO many things that COULD be!

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]"the president could have an affair with Beyonce!"[/quote<] Well at least that one could have an ounce of truth to it. 😛

      • Scrotos
      • 7 years ago

      That plus NASA has been doing upgrades like that since, what, Voyager? Voyager 2? What are hackers going to do, wardriving in space to haxx0r their Gibson?

        • Mourmain
        • 7 years ago

        Yup, they were still correcting the firmware on Voyager 2 a couple of years ago, due to memory corruption.

      • BIF
      • 7 years ago

      Maybe we should see if Mr. Farrell is willing to fly to Mars to install the latest copy of Norton 360.

    • south side sammy
    • 7 years ago

    who’s in line for the next x86 license, wait a minute, Via……………. what a scary thought. Perhaps only allowing 1 company it’s time for competition……… but x86 is a lost cause considering the way things are changing right now. Look where Microsoft is.

      • BIF
      • 7 years ago

      X86 is a lost cause?

      How so when I just recently read an article that they were going to make 32-bit tablets or cappucino makers or some damned thing with X86 chips and chipsets?

    • jdaven
    • 7 years ago

    Nvidia: Yields of Kepler graphics processors are improving, supply situations getting easier

    But wait I thought it was because Kepler was so popular that the millions of cards made on a totally mature process were bought by everyone including grandmas and Eskimos. I guess this is one of those AMD fanboy rumors. I will only trust what Nvidia says. Wait…what?

      • Jive
      • 7 years ago

      I think you’ve gone off the deep end.

      • chuckula
      • 7 years ago

      Go look at Nvidia’s profits vs. AMD’s (non) profits before you run around claiming that Kepler is a huge failure.

      • Scrotos
      • 7 years ago

      I’m there with you. I don’t care about AMD or nvidia either way (I have both), but all I remember reading is about how nvidia cards weren’t on the shelves because they were in such high demand, not due to supply issues. That’s the first thing I thought about when I read that headline. I figured it’d be an inaccurate take on some offhand comment, but that’s the CEO saying there’s pent-up demand for these chips. There’d only be pent-up demand if they couldn’t meet the demand in the first place. Man, what drama.

        • Duck
        • 7 years ago

        > I remember reading is about how nvidia cards weren’t on the shelves because they were in such high demand, not due to supply issues.

        Well both can be true at the same time. Demand was high and supply was constrained (they would have sold more cards if only they could produce enough GPUs). Resulting in the cards being out of stock.

        Yields can be beyond exemplary, but supply can still be constrained because of the low number of wafers available on a new process. So don’t confuse low supply with low yields.

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