Nvidia details OEM version of GeForce GTX 660

Nvidia released the GeForce GTX 660 Ti less than one week ago. Now, the company’s website has added specifications for an "OEM" derivative of the card. Meant for system builders, the GeForce GTX 660 (OEM) appears to be based on the same GK104 GPU as its Ti sibling. While the Ti disables one of that chip’s eight SMX units, the GTX 660’s 1152 shader ALUs suggest the lights have been turned off on two SMX engines. Nvidia’s product page makes no mention of whether the number of ROP partitions has changed, though. The GeForce GTX 660 Ti uses three of the four ROP partitions on the GK104, and I’d expect the same number to be active in the OEM card.

In addition to fewer ALUs, the GeForce GTX 660 sports lower clock speeds. The card has an 823MHz base clock and an 888MHz boost rate, both down about 100MHz from the Ti. The memory clock is slower, as well. Nvidia quotes a 5.8 GT/s memory transfer rate, which is admittedly a drop of only 200 MT/s. Although the OEM variant’s memory interface width remains 192 bits wide, cards will be available with 1.5 or 3GB of onboard memory rather than the 2GB found on the Ti.

Trimming units and lowering clock speeds allow Nvidia to squeeze the OEM model into a smaller power envelope than its big brother. The GTX 660 Ti has a maximum power rating of 150W and requires dual 6-pin PCIe power connectors, but the OEM flavor is rated for 130W and demands just one PCIe power lead.

This OEM offering could hint at what to expect from an eventual GeForce GTX 660 destined for store shelves. Nvidia released the GeForce GTX 560 just a few months after the Ti version of that card, and it doesn’t have any Kepler-based products selling for less than $300. A hypothetical GeForce GTX 660 might make a good foil for the recently discounted Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition at $249. Thanks to Fudzilla for the tip.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    GK106 had better be called a 650Ti or something without the number 660 in it.

    Nvidia have always been bad/coy about naming their products but they have reached new lows with Kepler. The only number they’ve left for their midrange product is 650 and they have a gaping performance chasm between the GT 640 and the GTX 660.

    If you want to see a real mess, try the Kepler Laptop Challenge!

    [list=1<][*<]Find any laptop listings online. Either from the manufacturers or from a retailer [/*<][*<]Pick any one with a 600-series gpu from the following range: 630M / 635M / 640M / 640M LE / 650M [/*<][*<]See if you can work out what it actually uses, [i<]I dare you![/i<][/*<][/list<] It would appear that you can get a GK107 (what you'd expect) or also perhaps a GF114, GF116, GF117, GF108, GF106. Will it have DDR3 or GDDR5? I have actually chatted to sales reps from a couple of manufacturers and even they have NO IDEA. I'm not talking random first-tier sales reps either; I am calling account managers, confusing them and getting put through to technical product specialists, who still don't know :\ In short, Nvidia is using up old inventory and a product name is now so worthless in the mobile space that it's a total crapshoot. You buy a laptop and the only GPU option is a GT6xxM([b<]LE[/b<]) where the LE stands for [i<][b<]Lucky-dip Edition[/b<][/i<]....

      • pogsnet
      • 7 years ago
    • Narishma
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]and it doesn't have any Kepler-based products selling for less than $300[/quote<] Isn't the GT 640 based on Kepler?

      • Alexko
      • 7 years ago

      It is. It’s very crappy, but Kepler-based.

      • Star Brood
      • 7 years ago

      People are buying the 640? I think they are “selling” the 640 but I don’t think any are “sold”.

        • brucethemoose
        • 7 years ago

        If they cut the price in half, it would be an awesome HTPC card.

        Sadly, this is the same GPU they stick in the Retina MBP, thousands of which are being sold. Seems pretty puny for something that costs as much as a used car, doesn’t it?

      • pogsnet
      • 7 years ago
    • brucethemoose
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<] cards will be available with 1.5 or 3GB of onboard memory [/quote<] 3GB memory? I can already see the marketing bullet point, and the $100 graphics "upgrade" to 3GB. Memory size seems to be the first thing OEMs advertise with graphics, and I think it's safe to assume most customers don't know that 1.5GB more wont do squat. Reminds me of those 2GB 6450s... There's a word for this sort of advertising, it has to do with bovine excretions, and I don't think I'm allowed to say it on TR.

      • dpaus
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]There's a word for this sort of advertising, it has do do with bovine excretions, and I don't think I'm allowed to say it on TR[/quote<] But if you just changed it to moose excretions, you'd own the copyright to the concept and we'd still get the idea. Better do that before Apple patents it and you have to get a license from them to take a crap.

        • brucethemoose
        • 7 years ago

        A license? Apple doesn’t license, you’d just do your business on one of their own products.

        That said, if they extend the patent to the general concept of a moose, I might run into trouble posting on TR.

          • dpaus
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<]you'd just do your business on one of their products[/quote<] I urge everyone to do exactly that 🙂

            • brucethemoose
            • 7 years ago

            No pun intended 🙂

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      This will be considerably faster than most cards with over-sized VRAM, at least.

    • sweatshopking
    • 7 years ago

    this is unnecessarily confusing to end users.

    first

      • ALiLPinkMonster
      • 7 years ago

      What exactly is confusing about it?

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        He finds anything without Metro confusing.

        • Alexko
        • 7 years ago

        The fact that the “Ti” suffix is not enough to tell the two cards apart, I guess.

        More importantly and given NVIDIA’s history, there’s a strong chance that a retail GTX 660 might eventually show up that would be different from the OEM version.

        And then, we would end up with something like this: [url<]http://www.geforce.com/hardware/desktop-gpus/geforce-gtx-460/specifications[/url<]

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        the fact that most people won’t understand the difference between the cards. like the 3gb per card crap. making the products confusing, so people don’t know what to buy. the TI moniker isn’t enough to separate, imo, the products for the layman. i know the difference, i’m a guy who likes this stuff. you guys know, you’re nerds. but your average guy? i’m not so sure.

          • Kurotetsu
          • 7 years ago

          The average layman doesn’t buy graphics cards, so its moot. Nowadays, they use whatever came in their laptop, smartphone and/or tablet.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            Exactly, and if they do they usually ask their “expert buddy” what they would recommend. Enthusiast cards shouldn’t have to be dumbed downed to “good,better,best” or “fast, faster, more faster” for the market that they are targeted for. Secondly, this is an OEM card and I hope like hell that the purchasers for those OEM’s know the difference. If not then they are in store for a world of trouble. The end consumer is more then likely going to get these cards preinstalled from the likes of Dell, HP, etc and enthusiasts are not exactly likely to buy one of those machines from those OEMs in the first place.

            • ALiLPinkMonster
            • 7 years ago

            They do buy graphics cards, but they usually buy them at Best Buy in which case they probably aren’t aware of this particular website.

            • internetsandman
            • 7 years ago

            And pay a hundred bucks more than they would anywhere else

          • ALiLPinkMonster
          • 7 years ago

          This information is not meant for the layman. It’s an OEM part meant for pre-built systems. I highly doubt the average not-so-informed gamer is going to buy an OEM card, and I’m sure Dell’s website will say nothing more than “blazing fast, high-resolution gaming!” in the description for a system containing a GTX 660 and “even faster!” for one with a 660 Ti.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            i understand that it’s an OEM part, but if my buddy has a 660, and i buy a dell with a 660, i’m not getting the same thing.

            as for the “average layman doesn’t buy graphics cards”, it’s simply not true. you’re right your grandmother doesn’t, but people are buying them. best buy isn’t moving many anymore, just check the recent quarterly report. they’re not moving anything. I haven’t seen the general gpu sales fall, as best buys has, so that means they’re going somewhere. Intel is taking a larger share of TOTAL gpu’s, but afaik discrete nvidia and amd’s percentages have been REASONABLY static for years. dell’s new numbers aren’t good, so they’re not going there. 22% drop, for dell, and nowhere near that for amd or nvidia

            My point is that people ARE buying them, and more people are buying them that don’t actually know what they’re getting. if you disagree, show me the numbers that back it up. it’s possible i’m incorrect.

            • Malphas
            • 7 years ago

            Until a retail GTX 660 exists SSK, it’s a bit baseless to say whether it’s confusing or not. For all you know the retail 660 might be close enough to the OEM 660 for any differences to be irrelevant, or there might not be a retail 660 at all. It’s no more confusing than the myriad of Ivy Bridge CPUs available for instance; in fact it’s significantly less confusing.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            The ‘fact’ is that the layman wouldn’t notice the difference in performance anyways if it was named something different or not. It certianly no more confusing then any other product out there. How many prebuiltsout there carry the same model name but have wildly different specs? How many vehicles, tv’s etc all do the same thing but somehow a video card to you is different.

            I mean an ATI 9200 must be faster then a 7970 right because it has a larger number.

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