Release roundup: Gaming headphones and workstation goodies

We’ve got a mix of workstation hardware and enthusiast gear in this week’s release roundup. Announcements from Cooler Master, Kingston, and Sapphire have all made it into our inbox:

  • Cooler Master intros Ceres-400 headset. The folks at Cooler Master are known more for their cases and heatsinks than for audio equipment, but they do have a small lineup of headsets. The latest model, the Ceres-400, is coming this month with a $49.99 price tag. Cooler Master says it features 40-mm drivers, "oversized and breathable" 90-mm pads, a noise-canceling microphone, and an in-line remote with buttons to control the volume and to mute the mic. Head on over to the official product page for more details.

  • Kingston helps drive big data and virtualization initiatives with new SSDNow E100 enterprise SSD. The new SSDNow E100 solid-state drive has a 2.5" form factor and 6Gbps Serial ATA connectivity, just like Kingston’s consumer offerings. However, the drive purportedly delivers "up to 10X improvements in endurance and reliability over client SSDs." Capacities of 100GB, 200GB, and 400GB are on offer, with transfer rates up to 535MB/s for sequential reads and 500MB/s for sequential writes. Peak IOPS are 37,000 for both random reads and writes. Kingston covers the drive with a three-year warranty, too.

  • Sapphire PGS launches FirePro professional platform. Remember those FirePro A300-series processors APUs AMD announced earlier this month? Well, Sapphire now has a workstation platform that takes advantage of them. The A320M Professional Platform couples AMD’s A320 APU with Sapphire’s A3 M motherboard—a Micro-ATX specimen with an array of display outputs (DVI, VGA, and DisplayPort, complete with EyeFinity support), a PCI Express x16 slot ripe for FirePro discrete cards (to which compute tasks can be offloaded), and an assortment of USB 2.0 and 6Gbps Serial ATA ports, among other features. Sapphire touts certification from "major" software vendors, as well.

I’m not a connoisseur of workstation hardware, but I expect some professionals may enjoy the prospect of a small-form-factor CAD rig powered by that Sapphire mobo. Who said desktop workstations had to be big, cumbersome affairs?

Comments closed
    • Welch
    • 7 years ago

    I’m curious to see where these fit into the market. I guess OEM’s selling them in a professional series device (laptop or whatever) and calling it a “Workstation” may be its selling point. I’ve seen a numerous number of customers with Dell laptops with Nvidia Quadro video cards in it because they thought they were buying something innately superior. All these individuals do is surf the web.

    I’ve got to read more into the stats on these APUs, but perhaps running these in a crossfire like format with a dedicated Firepro would reap some benefits. I’d consider them if they made sense for a professional who needed a spare system. Recently built a beast of a machine for an AutoCAD user who needs a spare for when they hire additional people for larger projects to take care of smaller portions of the work. Perhaps having something at this performance/price would be a sweet spot as spending 3+ grand on a spare machine just doesn’t seem sensible.

    Considering AutoCAD and other workstation software like it is in need of good IPC, and memory bandwidth… this platform doesn’t seem to offer either. And no USB 3.0? Seriously, your professionals want to move their large amounts of data fast, USB 2.0, what a joke.

    • south side sammy
    • 7 years ago

    only available in India where cheap, small form factor work stations are in demand….and not to mention only available in OEM…… lotta good that’s going to do most of us………..

    • flip-mode
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]I'm not a connoisseur of workstation hardware, but I expect some professionals may enjoy the prospect of a small-form-factor CAD rig powered by that Sapphire mobo. Who said desktop workstations had to be big, cumbersome affairs?[/quote<] Nope. Almost universally, they wouldn't. They'll pick a Sandy / Ivy CPU and add a FirePro.

      • drfish
      • 7 years ago

      I’m putting one of those Firepro APUs into [url=http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811129185<]this guy[/url<] (miniITX) as soon as I possibly can. I don't need a lot of rendering power, just a small cheap system that runs the BS certified drivers. I am not alone.

        • fershnickety
        • 7 years ago

        The 100W rating on the A320 APU probably makes it unlikely that there’ll be a miniITX board for it. Also makes finding a PSU for it a lot harder…

          • drfish
          • 7 years ago

          A300 is a 65w part. 😉

      • tbone8ty
      • 7 years ago

      dumb-mode

        • flip-mode
        • 7 years ago

        You do realize these A300 CPUs have less performance per clock than Conroe? I build the CAD stations for my office. CPU performance remains extremely important. Choosing one of these A300 CPUs for a CAD station really would be dumb-mode. Sandy / Ivy are extremely potent CPUs for CAD and are worth every penny and then some. Even semi-serious CAD users will pick a Sandy / Ivy and one of the cheaper FirePro cards.

          • DragonDaddyBear
          • 7 years ago

          For you, maybe. But in emerging markets where computers are more expensive than labor (Chinda, India, etc) it is perfectly acceptable for these “slow” APU’s to be used.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]expensive than labor (Chinda, India, etc)[/quote<] /me google Chinda and finds out that is in Honduras

          • Deanjo
          • 7 years ago

          They would be better off getting an older fermi quadro card.

          [url<]http://vr-zone.com/articles/why-amd-firepro-still-cannot-compete-against-nvidia-quadro-old-or-new-/17074.html[/url<]

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