Wednesday Shortbread

The Pick 6

  1. TNW: AntiSec hackers leak 1,000,001 Apple

    device IDs allegedly obtained from FBI breach

  2. BBC News: BitTorrent study finds most file-sharers are monitored
  3. Fudzilla: AMD dual-Richland 28nm has 192 shaders

    and eleven AMD Zambezi processor EOL in Q4 2012

  4. X-bit labs: Online store starts to take pre-

    orders on A-series Fusion “Trinity” chips

  5. The new Steam Community is here
  6. Kotaku: The Mechromancer class in Borderlands 2

    lets you stack abilities. Releasing October 16.


Wednesday

  1. Yahoo! News: Samsung to audit all of its suppliers in China
  2. TNW: Samsung “deeply apologizes” to Indian blogger
  3. BCCHardware podcast
  4. Win an 8GB Crucial Ballistix Sport DDR3 1600MHz memory kit from Big Bruin
  5. Newegg’s quick-draw deals
  6. Dealzon’s deals: $200 off 17.3″ Dell Inspiron 17R i7-2670QM, $220 off

    15.6″ Asus R500A i5-3210M, $60 off 256GB OCZ Vertex 4 SSD, and

    $5 coupon for EVGA GeForce GTX 550 Ti video card

Mobile

  1. The Verge: HTC holding event on September

    19th, new Windows Phone 8 devices likely

  2. Fudzilla: Sony rules out getting into a tablet price war
  3. Engadget: Firefox OS Marketplace leaks in current form, shows shopping

    Gecko-style and NFL Game Rewind apps for iOS and Android tablets

    appear with coaches film and telestrator features

Software and gaming

  1. Softpedia: Introducing Ubuntu GNOME Remix 12.10
  2. HotHardware: Why Linux will never suffer from viruses like Windows
  3. IGN’s The Sims 3: Supernatural preview
  4. Techgage’s Counter-Strike: Global Offensive review

Systems and storage

  1. TweakTown reviews hp Folio 13 ultrabook
  2. OCC reviews Sapphire and ECS X79 motherboards
  3. Hardware Secrets on ASRock Z77 OC Formula
  4. HCW’s 256GB Samsung 830 SSD review
  5. The SSD Review on 128GB AData SX300 mSATA SSD
  6. Benchmark Reviews on Thermaltake BlacX 5G SATA / USB docking station
  7. Neoseeker’s 32GB Patriot Class 10 EP Pro SDHC review
  8. PCStats reviews Belkin F5U307-BRN 7-port USB 2.0 hub

Multimedia and cooling

  1. Fudzilla reviews Club 3D HD 7970 GHz royalAce Edition
  2. X-bit labs review EVGA GTX 680 SOC Signature 2
  3. PC Perspective reviews Corsair K60 and K90 keyboards
  4. HTL reviews SilverStone AP series case fans
  5. Lifehacker posts a beginner’s guide to water

    cooling your computer (thanks Neutronbeam)

  6. ocaholic reviews Thermalright Silver Arrow SB-E cooler
Comments closed
    • willmore
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]PCStats reviews Belkin F5U307-BRN 7-port USB 2.0 hub [/quote<] They wonder what the hole in the hub is for. Hmm, maybe they haven't seen any of the other hubs that Belkin has made in the last decade. It's for stacking them. These people understood it: [url<]http://www.everythingusb.com/belkin-7-port-plus-usb-2.0-hub-21574.html[/url<]

    • dpaus
    • 7 years ago

    Oh, dear….. [url=http://www.thestar.com/business/sciencetech/article/1251435–nokia-introduces-microsoft-powered-lumias-in-comeback-attempt<]Investors 'not impressed' with Nokia's new Lumia phones, stock plunges[/url<]

      • blastdoor
      • 7 years ago

      This is frustrating. Clearly what I’m about to say is a matter of taste and reasonable people can disagree, but I think Windows Phone represents a much more interesting alternative to iOS than Android. I currently use only iOS devices, but if I were ever to consider something else, it would be Windows Phone. And even if I never buy a WP device, I want it to succeed, because Microsoft is actually doing some original/interesting work that I think can push Apple to innovate going forward (Android can too — clearly the Android approach to notifications lit a fire under Apple, but overall, WP seems a lot more innovative to me than Android).

      The situation that WP is in really is reminiscent of PC OSes from the past that failed mostly because they were just too late to market — products like OS2, Amiga, BeOS, etc.

      Basically, I think the world would be a better place if MS and Nokia could establish a sustainable business here. I don’t want them, or anyone else, to take over the world. I just want sustainable competition. But I’m not going to hold my breath 🙁

        • dpaus
        • 7 years ago

        Funny the you didn’t mention QNX; RIM’s QNX-based BB10 OS is due out in early 2013, and I’m looking forward to seeing what they come up with

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 7 years ago

        WP is going to fail because the average consumer hates Microsoft. They could make the best product and people would still choose Android or iOS.

        The only reason desktop Windows still sells is because people want things not made by Microsoft that’s exclusive to Windows.

        Also, it depends what you mean by something more interesting. Microsoft is following the same locked down walled garden as Apple, a lot of people find Android interesting because of the open nature of it. Being able to do what you want with your device is important to a lot of people.

          • l33t-g4m3r
          • 7 years ago

          You speak the truth. People don’t use Windows because it’s a closed platform, they use it because it’s open and easy to use. Locking down is not the way to go when your customers don’t want it, and Apple already has that market. Linux kinda sucks as a desktop OS, but that could change with an influx of paying users displaced from Microsoft.

            • blastdoor
            • 7 years ago

            My guess is that the number of people care about open versus closed platforms is relatively small — perhaps even smaller than the number of people who buy macs instead of pcs.

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 7 years ago

            Boy that’s a crock. By that logic Apple should have equal marketshare with windows. Not to mention that’s one of Android’s selling features. Good for a laugh though, as long as you don’t have any empathy for how sad it is that you believe that.

            Some people may not know or fully understand what an open platform is, but they still want and choose it. Why is that? Because it does what they want it to do, compared to a non-open system. If these people were educated of the differences, we would have less people falling victim to schemes such as Microsoft’s App store and Windows 8. Windows 8 is the perfect scam in that sense, because win32 compatibility pulls the wool over your eyes, while WinRT sucks your money. Not going to turn out well once the public gets wise.

            I predict a linux revolution in under 10 years. It’s already taken over servers and business, and only a matter of time for consumers. Why? Because you can’t compete with [i<]honest[/i<] software. Notice how I said honest and not free, because when you deliberately cripple your own software to drive up profits the users revolt. Microsoft could easily prevent this by not attempting to monetize their OS, but it looks like that ship has sailed.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]Boy that's a crock.[/quote<] Not really. It's bang on. The reason Android is popular isn't because it is open. A vast majority wouldn't know what open means but what they do recognize is the association of Android and Google. Again not because Google promotes an open platform but because they use Google every day. I would venture then less then .1% of android purchases are bought from people that can actually do something with it being opensource.

            • destroy.all.monsters
            • 7 years ago

            You mean like all those roms people are using? Cyanogenmod?

            It might not be a huge percentage but it isn’t nothing.

            We aren’t just talking about hackers here, we’re talking users.

            And frankly with your overly-rose colored glasses vis a vis Apple I suspect that you just don’t want to see it as a reason.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            I bet I can grab 100 android users and less then a couple of percent have other ROM’s installed or Cyanogenmod. No rose coloured glasses just plain fact. In fact I would venture the percentage of jailbroke iDevices is roughly the same (maybe a bit more since every model is well documented on how to do so).

            • destroy.all.monsters
            • 7 years ago

            You’re just guessing though. There are numerous reasons why people prefer the MS PC world and you can’t just say that it doesn’t matter. Whether people can articulate it or not (or even identify it without assistance) the fact that you can do things the way you want to in Windows impacts people’s perception of it. So does being able to install the software you want and not what’s been approved.

            When MS largely closes their ecosystem they become an also-ran. A not very popular also-ran at that.

    • superjawes
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]II.HotHardware: Why Linux will never suffer from viruses like Windows [/quote<] Funny. A lot of his remarks about how Linux is safer still come down to lack of market share. For example, you only get software from a few sources, so said sources are safe, but there aren't that many sources because Linux is a niche market. And on top of that, many software developers want closed source apps because they want copy control, so open source systems aren't appealing in that respect (or they appear on a store like on Android). And then he has a bogus conclusion, where he says that if Linux had the same market share, it would bea diverse set of distros rather than a single OS...but that's part of the reason why Linux has such a small market share. Distros are put together for niche audiences, not mass consuption. If Linux ever were to have a significant market share, it would primarily be a single distro and not the diverse population we see right now. Linux is a great tool, but it's not going to out-Windows Windows without adopting some of the same closed practices that Microsoft does.

      • BIF
      • 7 years ago

      Your analysis is workable and in my opinion, brilliantly presented.

      I can only speak for myself here, but I for one am not interested in doing development for Linux because of my perception that there is no profit motive in it.

      Contributing to that is my experience that it’s too hard to install, it’s too hard to use, has a very steep learning curve, gets tripped up by unexpected USB devices being plugged in, and STILL has only a small minority of userbase, which results in quieter support forums. Various distros, while attempting to address certain concerns and make things easier, really accomplish neither objective.

      So the question to me is this: Is the smallness of the ecosystem the cause or the effect of the open source thing? I don’t know. Maybe it does not matter after all. Maybe it is a chicken/egg thing (it does not matter which came first because we know that both are edible and both taste good).

        • superjawes
        • 7 years ago

        It is possibly both. The best quote I ever heard about Linux is: “Linux is only free if your time is worthless.” A little harsh, but it’s pretty dead on when it comes to your personal time investment versus what you get. The best Linux environments are personally crafted or adjusted for specific uses, in which case they can outperform Windows, but again, [i<]you[/i<] have to put in the time for it. If someone were willing to handle all the bugfixes and other services that come along with an OS like Windows, it's not likely to be free (I think Red Hat comes to mind), and if you're fixing bugs for them, you're adding value to what you paid without getting compensated for it. It could be different if everyone were as computer literate as your typical Linux enthusiast, but frankly, most people prefer to consume media provided on computers rather than tinker with the system, much like your typical driver versus car enthusiast.

          • Deanjo
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<]It is possibly both. The best quote I ever heard about Linux is: "Linux is only free if your time is worthless." A little harsh, but it's pretty dead on when it comes to your personal time investment versus what you get. The best Linux environments are personally crafted or adjusted for specific uses, in which case they can outperform Windows, but again, you have to put in the time for it.[/quote<] That's a waaaaaay outdated argument. Many of the linux distributions are far friendlier then windows. I have yet to see someone that finds KDE use frustrating and not easy to adapt too. Where as I have seen all too many times people griping how their windows OS needs a reinstall because they installed something wrong, deleted something or just generally didn't have a sniff on how to fix something as trivial as emptying their trashbin to free up disk space. My time is valuable, and is exactly the reason why I dumped windows a long long time ago. It simply wasn't efficient to keep using with it's constant maintenance. [quote<]If someone were willing to handle all the bugfixes and other services that come along with an OS like Windows, it's not likely to be free (I think Red Hat comes to mind), and if you're fixing bugs for them, you're adding value to what you paid without getting compensated for it.[/quote<] All bug fixes are free and always have been. What Redhat offers is official paid support. You know just like MS does with windows. There are bug fixes and security fixes put out everyday and are made available to all in linux. [quote<]It could be different if everyone were as computer literate as your typical Linux enthusiast, but frankly, most people prefer to consume media provided on computers rather than tinker with the system, much like your typical driver versus car enthusiast.[/quote<] Yet another misconception. The difference is that people are tuned to the "windows way" from so many years of use. I have several people that are not "programmed to windows" and use linux easily and effortlessly aging from 8 years old to 80. My kids started using OS X and linux both before they were ten and have absolutely no issues with it and are quite at home with it. It did not take them for me to babysit their every move either. The odd time they may have a question but no more then any windows user asking another person on how to do something on windows.

            • superjawes
            • 7 years ago

            How much work do you go through getting a Windows game working for Linux because there isn’t a Linux version? Even then, do they work?

            And you say my argument is outdated, but everything you mentioned about people dealing with Windows could also be argued as outdated. The difference is that Windows covers the basics automatically from updates to system restores. True, some people still don’t know how to use all of those features, but switching to Linux isn’t going to fix that. Oh, and even if you’re making more time now, there’s still a time investment into Linux (point being that it’s not free).

            Your comments about Redhat…were exactly what I was pointing out. Pay = service. Free = on your own. See what’s going on here? Again, Microsoft built a lot of that into Windows, and there is an army of savvy professionals trained to handle issues (many of which are already in place at tech support).

            And for the last “misconception,” how much extra stuff do you need to get the functionality of Windows? We already established that Linux users have to find their own bugfixes (author pointed that out), and they get a Windows emulator to play games outside of Windows (which isn’t always perfect). That’s not being “tuned” to the environment, that’s a hinderance on it. People don’t want to fix problems to play a game or watch a video…they want to play games and watch videos. This is why consoles do well, and why Windows does the same. Things just WORK.

            I’m not trying to disrespect Linux. I’m just trying to point out that there are very real hurdles between where we are now and a world where Linux has majority share, and it’s never going to gain ground unless someone addresses those hurdles like Gabe making Steam available on Linux (which won’t be perfect until all the games are available through it).

            EDIT: and going all the way back to the article, your various hackers will exploit whatever they deem valuable enough. That means that yes, if Linux had Windows’s market share, it would have new trojans coming out daily. On top of that, if there really are limited places you can get the fix, many systems will remain vulnerable for a longer time, and if they loosen restrictions to get fixes out faster, you’re right back where Windows is.

            Linux: Not the paradise it’s made out to be.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]How much work do you go through getting a Windows game working for Linux because there isn't a Linux version? Even then, do they work?[/quote<] A lot of times it is a lot simpler then the native windows install where I either have to install updated audio , video, .net, dx components. How many linux games can you run on your windows install? Nice red herring. [quote<] Oh, and even if you're making more time now, there's still a time investment into Linux (point being that it's not free). [/quote<] There is still a lot of time investment into windows. More so then linux. For example, do you have a fully functional system upon installing windows a few months after a windows version has been released or are you hunting down drivers, trying to find out what hardware you have, etc. With linux I can upgrade or even do a clean install and have a fully functional system in a matter of minutes. [quote<] Your comments about Redhat...were exactly what I was pointing out. Pay = service. Free = on your own. See what's going on here? Again, Microsoft built a lot of that into Windows, and there is an army of savvy professionals trained to handle issues (many of which are already in place at tech support). [/quote<] Newflash for ya, it's the exact same thing as MS. MS charges you a per incident charge if you are not on a support contract. Same as Redhat. There are also an onslaught of professionals and experts waiting to help out anyone in linux. Many of which are the actual developers themselves and even have the same MS certs that your "savvy professionals" have and not some monkey reading out of a kbase article that they found doing a internal database search. [quote<] And for the last "misconception," how much extra stuff do you need to get the functionality of Windows? We already established that Linux users have to find their own bugfixes (author pointed that out), and they get a Windows emulator to play games outside of Windows (which isn't always perfect). That's not being "tuned" to the environment, that's a hinderance on it. People don't want to fix problems to play a game or watch a video...they want to play games and watch videos. This is why consoles do well, and why Windows does the same. Things just WORK. [/quote<] Newsflash linux is not Windows. Your red herring about gaming is the only thing you seem to be concerned about. Most PC users in fact do not game on their PC. Even in windows land. Again, I have several windows games that will run fine on linux through wine but will not run on newer versions of windows. Hell the installers will not even complete the task because they do not know how to read the new windows versions. Heck if this wasn't even a problem in windows they would not have compatibility mode or the need for adding a virtualization solution such as XP mode in Windows 7 now would they? [quote<] EDIT: and going all the way back to the article, your various hackers will exploit whatever they deem valuable enough. That means that yes, if Linux had Windows's market share, it would have new trojans coming out daily. On top of that, if there really are limited places you can get the fix, many systems will remain vulnerable for a longer time, and if they loosen restrictions to get fixes out faster, you're right back where Windows is. [/quote<] First of all linux, by design is set to have users run with limited rights. This alone already makes linux more secure then windows. Because of this, system wide exploits are much harder to do then it is on Windows. If a user account gets infected, it effects that user and a simple change of user renders that exploit ineffective. As far as getting the fixes goes, you have a far larger selection to get the fix then any windows version as fixes go out and are applied throughout the entire linux ecosystem which are on thousands of mirrors around the world. In windows you are limited to either your spyware/av software or MS themselves and that is if they have a solution available other then doing the typical boot to safe mode and hunt down a bunch of files scatter across the filesystem and then hunting down every bit of registery that has been changed. Windows: Not even close to the paradise it's made out to be.

            • superjawes
            • 7 years ago

            So you say that I threw out “red herrings” about Linux, and you combat that with…flasehoods and half-truths about Windows?

            If Linux had the market share that Windows did, it would not be the Lniux environment that you know right now. There isn’t an infrastructure in place like Windows has, and there isn’t nearly the app support. Those aren’t red herrings, they are facts. Windows might carry other issues and potential issues, but people already know how to fix them, and you cannot deny the fact that more software is available for Windows in the desktop space. It’s kind of hard to sidestep.

            And again, more users = more attacks. It doesn’t matter how secure Linux seems right now, the sheer number of users makes a significant difference in how many vulnerabilities are actually exploited. We’ve seen reports that OSX has more vulnerabilites, yet why do we still talk about Windows Trojans? Because getting the horse into Troy is far more valuable than getting into Nowhere, Idaho. It doesn’t matter how “inheirently secure” Linux is or seems. The attacks would kick up quick if market shares were reversed.

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]Distros are put together for niche audiences, not mass consuption.[/quote<] What niche audiences do the likes of openSUSE, Fedora, Ubuntu, Mandriva, Mint, etc cater too?

        • superjawes
        • 7 years ago

        What stores are they sold in? What new computers come with these distros installed? Since I know some of them are free, there really is no reason NOT to put them on a big box computer, unless something was severely crippling their functionality or usability. And I could simply say: “the anti-Windows crowd.”

        If it were that easy to get people switched to Linux, it would have happened by now.

          • Deanjo
          • 7 years ago

          You clearly have no idea what niche market means. Since the above distros aim for functionality that everyone can use it is not a niche system. An example of a niche market OS would be the various versions of Windows server.

    • superjawes
    • 7 years ago

    Did we miss this one?

    [url=http://www.vg247.com/2012/09/05/ubisoft-scraps-drm-issues-statement/<]Ubi Scraps DRM?[/url<] I am...quite surprised by that. Not long after their CEO called 93-95% of PC gamers pirates, they go with one of the most relaxed systems? Color me impressed if they're being truthful.

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4F4qzPbcFiA[/url<]

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    From the article “..eleven AMD Zambezi processor EOL in Q4 2012”:

    [quote<]The rest of the list includes FX 8120 also an eight-core part, six-core FX 8120 and FX 6200, dual core FX 4170, all 125W TDP parts. From the list of 95W parts AMD plans to end of life of FX 8140, 8120 and 8100 all eight core parts, FX 6120 and FX 6100 six core parts and FX 4150 and FX 4100 quad-core parts.[/quote<] Six-core FX-8120? Looks like a typo. And FX-8140? FX-8100? FX-6120? FX-4150? Maybe they're listed on AMD's website but I haven't come across any of those chips. Maybe they're sold only in some markets? Who has come across those aforementioned SKUs?

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      Have you tried google.com ? its a search engine for the web.
      You can type anything, like “fx-6120” and see what result you get.. its really cool, you should try it.

      Oh, and its a typo… when you read “..FX 8120 also an eight-core part, six-core FX 8120…”
      Thats your clue.

        • ronch
        • 7 years ago

        Sschaem, thank you for your sarcastic response. All I’m saying are these chips are rare. You don’t see them everyday at Tigerdirect or Newegg. I don’t even Google them because I am [u<]not even[/u<] aware of them or may have read about them and forgot them already due to their rarity. And even if you Google them most of the top results are not from vendors selling them. They are listed, and they do exist, but they sure aren't common. No need to be sarcastic, dude. As for the typo, [quote<]six-core FX 8120[/quote<] really can't be seen as correct, no matter how you turn your head upside-down. It should be "six-core FX-[b<]6[/b<]120 and FX-6200.."

    • Arclight
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]I.TNW: AntiSec hackers leak 1,000,001 Apple [/quote<] From the linked article: [quote<]TNW has contacted the FBI for comment. Meanwhile, AntiSec says it will not provide further statements or interviews until a mysterious request is fulfilled – to have a photo of a Gawker staff writer dressed in a tutu featured on the company’s homepage[/quote<] Oh teh lolz hahahahaha. Edit: [url<]http://gawker.com/5940444/here-is-a-picture-of-a-gawker-writer-wearing-a-tutu-with-a-shoe-on-his-head[/url<] [quote<]But yesterday Anonymous wrote in a press release accompanying the leak of one million of the IDs: [quote]no more interviews to anyone till Adrian Chen get featured in the front page of Gawker, a whole day, with a huge picture of him dressing a ballet tutu and shoe on the head.[/quote<] Source: the article in the link above.

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 7 years ago

      Not like we haven’t known this wasn’t going on. The problem is that nobody takes it seriously and it’s illegal. The government knows where you are at all times through GPS tracking, monitors your conversations with keyword searches, spies on your web use, torrents, and Google searches. We are literally one President away from hardcore tyranny, if not already there. After all, what are all those hollow point rounds going to be used for? AntiSec needs to release all of the info, perhaps to wikileaks or a trustworthy news organization, before they get disappeared.

        • yogibbear
        • 7 years ago

        So… considering you just typed all that on the interwebs should we expect to next hear from you inside a prison cell getting juiced up one happy pills? Or is that only if you typed something silly like “I’m going to kill <insert important government person here>” sarcastically and due to the nature of the net, the sarcasm detectors would miss this and the anti-terrorist dataloggers would drill down and hey presto! your house is getting invaded while you’re doing the dishes and watching the X-factor?

          • l33t-g4m3r
          • 7 years ago

          This is exactly what I’m talking about. The Government is disappearing people, and that is a FACT.
          [url<]http://www.infowars.com/marine-kidnapped-over-facebook-posts-i-am-scared-for-my-country/[/url<] What else is the NSA datacenter going to be used for? [url<]http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/03/ff_nsadatacenter/[/url<] Hell, they don't even need a datacenter other than for more secrecy, because all the spy tech has been implemented by the corporations that you do business with. Google saves your searches, your iphone tracks you, etc. The only problem with this approach is that the info has a higher probability of being leaked. Every time somebody gets their hands on the info, a judge declares the wiretapping illegal. I don't know how many different articles I've come across about that happening. If this leak is real, then this is more usable ammunition for the EFF and ACLU. Side note: I don't watch "TV", aside from a few movies here and there. Nothing on but corporate brainwashing telling you to go back to sleep, and the news only reports what they're allowed to report.

          • BIF
          • 7 years ago

          Oh come now, he doesn’t waste time watching something as pedantic and useless as X-Factor.

          For the true Conspiracy Theorist, only “The Great Escape” will do…

            • yogibbear
            • 7 years ago

            I was just trying to think of some lame popular TV show that would end my sentence hilariously giving you the chance to giggle at something that could be taken either a) deadly serious or b) comically serious or c) all of the above. If I’d picked a TV show I actually watch or hope other people watch… you might not have gotten that same feeling of normality and weirdness that the juxtaposition achieved… e.g. replace X-factor with Archer? Does it have the same beauty? No, because 1. you probably don’t watch Archer, or 2. had to think about what that TV show was and then realised it is a good show thus breaking my entire point that ANYONE could be caught because we all know that people that watch good TV shows deserve to be locked up to improve the X-factors ratings. I mean seriously, how is that show even good in the ratings? What sort of dumb people watch TV on their TV these days?

          • oldDummy
          • 7 years ago

          what once was thought as tin-foil hat conspiracies has been verified over time: when the stock market was poised for a meltdown all of a sudden in stepped the invisible hand of what/who-ever buying futures like they had an unlimited risk budget….Later, Paulson admitted there was a Plunge Protection Team [PPT] manned by the fed.
          Google it and be surprised, if you dare. it might put you on a list.

          What else is being kept from public knowledge for the betterment of all? That’s just it, we don’t know.
          Big Brother is alive and well.

        • oldDummy
        • 7 years ago

        Absolutely correct.

        We are one nut away from craziness on an epic scale.

        With the economy in the dumps along with the extreme delta between haves/have-not’s society is showing overt signs of stress. In the US a record number of peoples are on food stamps. In France, Spain, Italy and Greece riots are commonplace. inequities are too numerous to mention.
        A charismatic nutty leader is all that is needed to set this bomb off.
        I worry for my children and grandchildren.
        The question is when not if.

        • willmore
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]After all, what are all those hollow point rounds going to be used for?[/quote<] One assumes they'll be used for target practice as it's normal procedure to do your target shooting with the gun and load that you'll be using on the job. For every bullet fired at a person, thousands are fired at little pieces of innocent paper. So, the sort answer is "for the same reason the batch they bought last year was--keeping their officers current with target practice."

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 7 years ago

          Last year, there was a police state, too. Try again. Are you with the government and here to help?

          But a few years ago, there was no Department of Homeland “Security” at all, no ICE, no TSA randomly pulling people over to do warrantless searches, no NSA with a giant datacenter to log the entire internets without a warrant, no heavily armed USDA, Social Security Administration, et al, no small, backwoods towns with armored personnel carriers and drones…

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            These days DHS has a note in the beginning of blu-ray movies that “piracy is bad, m’kay?”

            How is that related to “Homeland Security” in any sense of the word?

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 7 years ago

            That’s probably the FBI. If DHS [i<]did[/i<] have a dvd notice, then yeah you're right, and truthfully that would be more related to DHS being a big brother police state than providing security against "terrorism" or illegals crossing the border. That's all it is really, security theater and a police state for the people. The local Walmart here has been doing some remodeling, and it's all Mexicans. There's no way any of these organizations are doing anything other than terrorizing the citizens into submission, and that only works as long as the people stay afraid. You push it too far and make them angry, and the jig is up. They that can give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither and will lose both. -- Ben Franklin

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            It used to be FBI. Now the ‘page’ (‘frame’?) has both FBI and DHS logos side-by-side.

        • zzz
        • 7 years ago

        The government isn’t watching you or us, and even if it is, it isn’t recording you picking your nose in a coffee-shop. They’re watching people that might have ties to terrorism, they couldn’t give two shits, much less billions of dollars of harddrive space recording Joe Nobody Google how to better mow his lawn or his porn searches. You have an over-inflated sense of personal worth compensating for no one you know taking an interest in your life, so you invented a government conspiracy where ‘they’ are overly interested in your life. Life isn’t a video game, you’re not the ‘hero’, when everyone’s telling you you’re wrong… for fucks sakes re-evaluate your thought process.

          • l33t-g4m3r
          • 7 years ago

          The government doesn’t spy on terrorists, they dragnet everybody. That’s how they find the “terrorists” in the first place. It’s not done on a personal basis, but through keywords and computer algorithms that elevate your threat level. That means they’re illegally spying on citizens, but it’s through an automated process. There isn’t any other way they could do it. The government isn’t storing everybody’s data, only people who make their threat list, but Google certainly is storing your data, and so is Apple, and they both fully cooperate with the spy grid. If you don’t think Google, Facebook, Twitter, and Apple are storing your data when they clearly admit to it, YOU need to re-evaluate your thought process.

          Not to mention Google’s previously worked with the NSA, and has a direct partnership with spy tech company Recorded Future.
          [url<]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recorded_Future[/url<] [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImhVpC-G_jg[/url<] [quote<]Recorded Future Inc. is a software company based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States, specializing in web intelligence and predictive analytics. Using what they call a "temporal analytics engine", Recorded Future provides forecasting and analysis tools to help analysts predict future events by scanning sources on the Internet, and extracting, measuring, and visualizing the information to show networks and patterns in the past, present, and future. The software analyzes sources and forms "invisible links" between documents to find links that tie them together and may possibly indicate the entities and events involved. The company was founded in 2008 by Christopher Ahlberg[1] and has 20 employees as of November 2011.[2] Both Google (on May 3, 2010)[3] and the CIA have invested in the company, through their investment arms, Google Ventures and In-Q-Tel, respectively.[/quote<] Also, your flat out denial of government spying is laughably out of touch, especially when so much has already been admitted and is public knowledge. So, if you can't admit it exists when there's declassified public knowledge staring you right in the face, nobody is going to take your ridiculous insults serious. [url<]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSA_warrantless_surveillance_controversy[/url<]

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 7 years ago

    VI. ocaholic reviews Thermalright Silver Arrow SB-E cooler

    [url<]http://www.ocaholic.ch/xoops/html/modules/smartsection/item.php?itemid=833&sel_lang=english[/url<] Ironic the site is named "Ocaholic" and they tested a SNB-E HSF on a stock clocked i7 920.

    • NeelyCam
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]X-bit labs: Online store starts to take pre- orders on A-series Fusion "Trinity" chips[/quote<] "Preorder now, before the reviews are in! Trust us - it's good" Didn't we hear this one before...? Frizzt

      • GeorgeMichael
      • 7 years ago

      Don’t you get tired of posting the same shiz over and over again.
      We got it, you’re an Intel agent, we understand it’s your job, but posting the same shiz over and over again gets really boring really quickly.
      We know their CPUs are not the best, but the overall platform of Trinity is very good; in many ways much better than what Intel offers, at least you can enjoy some games on Trinity, and it’s pretty good for everything else.

      Go get a better job, being an Ewhore is not a decent one.

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        Oh, the irony…

          • chuckula
          • 7 years ago

          Looks like when GeorgeMichael messes with the best he gets trolled like the rest…

            • SomeOtherGeek
            • 7 years ago

            Love that movie, need to watch it again!

            • yogibbear
            • 7 years ago

            Yeah I still laugh about that cookie monster virus representation… man… i want one of those workstations…

        • Unknown-Error
        • 7 years ago

        [b<]GeorgeMichael[/b<] just got trolled! Another one bites the dust for [b<]NeelyCam[/b<]

        • dpaus
        • 7 years ago

        ‘George Michael’ advising someone else to ‘not be a whore’ – ohhhh, the irony!

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