Nokia details Lumia 820 and 920 handsets for Windows Phone 8

Microsoft hasn’t made much of a dent in the smartphone market, but perhaps its upcoming Windows Phone 8 operating system will change that. The OS should get some help from a couple of new Nokia handsets, the Lumia 820 and Lumia 920. Both devices run Windows Phone 8 and come in an array of brightly colored polycarbonate cases that match WP8’s tiled UI. They certainly have a distinct sense of style, and the hardware looks promising. 

The Lumia 920 in yellow

The Lumia 920 flagship is defined by a 4.5″ screen with a 1280×768 display resolution. Do the math, and that works out to 332 PPI, or about the same pixel density as the Retina display in the iPhone 4S. Like the iPhone, the 920 uses an IPS panel. The Lumia 820 has a smaller, 4.3″ screen based on AMOLED technology, and it has a display resolution of just 800×480. The Lumia 820’s pixel density works out to a less impressive 217 PPI.

When it introduced the new Lumias, Nokia made a big deal about the fact that their touchscreens work even when the user is wearing gloves. This Super Sensitive Touch tech comes from Synaptics, whose ClearPad Series 3 touchscreens are used by both devices. Alas, neither employs the latency-reducing Series 4 touchscreen we saw last month.

Although they have different displays, the Lumias both use dual-core Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 processors clocked at 1.5GHz. Both devices come with a gig of RAM, as well, but there are some differences on the storage front. The Lumia 920 has 32GB of built-in flash, while the 820 must make do with 8GB. Only the Lumia 820 comes with a memory card slot, a feature Executive Vice President Kevin Shields says “would have defiled” the 920’s design. Way to put form over function, Nokia. The 820’s memory slot, which appears to reside under the case’s rear cover, clearly ruins the aesthetic of that model. 

The Lumia 820 with the optional wireless charger

Users can swap the 820’s rear shell for one that offers wireless charging via a special mat. Wireless charging is built into the Lumia 920, which appears to have a fixed case. Let’s hope the batteries are easily accessible on both devices. The 920’s 2000 mAh battery promises 10 hours of 3G talk time, while the 820’s 1650 mAh unit is rated for 8 hours.

Naturally, the Lumias support 4G broadband networks in addition to Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and NFC. They both have integrated cameras with fancy lenses, and the 920 promises blur-free videos thanks to special image stabilization tech. Nokia has already caught some flak for misrepresenting that feature in the debut video; the company has since apologized and posted an accurate depiction of the Lumia’s image stabilization in action.

There’s still no official word on availability or pricing, rather important details in the grand scheme of things. I suspect the latter may be tweaked in response to Apple’s iPhone 5, whose announcement next week and will surely come hand-in-hand with a price cut for the current model.

Comments closed
    • sschaem
    • 7 years ago

    About freaking time! finally a phone that can play angry bird.

    And I guess I’m not the only one super excited about this phone !
    [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mUdh3dJrL8c[/url<]

    • puppetworx
    • 7 years ago

    I always think these Metro devices look like children’s toys with their big chunky colourful tiles and simplified icons. I understand that they are going for minimalism because it’s the fashion right now but if somebody is going to be dropping serious bank on a device they want sophistication and attention to detail. I just don’t think the style fits and that’s a huge factor in the status symbol driven consumer.

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      Yep, they do look very fisher price inspired.
      but my problem is not so much the style, but the function.

      Like metro the UI is just a throw-up of data, with no place or organization. And color means nothing.
      Its like the roadways regulation change what we have been used to for the past 50 years to all green. Stop sign -> green, yeld -> green, one way -> green, GO -> green, etc… Look uniform and nice in a ‘screen shot’ , but its lame to use.
      Or maybe in some town railroad crossing is purple and in other yellow.

      BTW, MS is even doing that in their professional product, they now use gray for everything.
      file ? gray… folder? gray…

    • Celess
    • 7 years ago

    How come you guys aren’t being sarcastic, like normal?

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      Really ?

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 7 years ago

    The inclusion of a memory card slot would have “defiled” Nokia’s bottom line when they upcharge for versions with more flash. Duh.

    • trackerben
    • 7 years ago

    The 820 in red is so retro-60’s cool. I am thinking of getting one and putting on it wallpapers and screensaver like so: [url<]http://www.thehal9000.com/[/url<]

    • novv
    • 7 years ago

    Absolutely great launch by Nokia & Microsoft!!! Now good luck to everyone looking for software made for Windows Phone 8. Their app store is a “killer one”, mostly inexistent…

    • sunner
    • 7 years ago

    AnandTech “hands-on impressions” of Nokia Lumia 820 and 920.
    Some of the things Anand was favorably impressed with …….

    ++ “Build quality” (“typical of Nokia”).
    ++ “Low-Light level” performance.
    ++ “Screen Sensitivity” (responds to touches from a “gloved-finger”).

    [url<]http://www.anandtech.com/show/6236/hands-on-with-the-nokia-lumia-920-lumia-820[/url<]

    • no51
    • 7 years ago

    DID SSK MAKE YOU POST THIS STORY???

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      YEAH. YOU WOULDN’T BELIEVE THE DEBASED THINGS CYRIL AND GEOFF FORCED ME TO DO. I’LL NEVER LOOK AT RODENTS THE SAME.

    • Voldenuit
    • 7 years ago

    Kudos to nokia for responding so quickly (the apology post was up last night) for the “fake video” post. In all fairness though, the nokia conversations page where the video was first uploaded clearly stated that the video was not shot on a 920 and was only meant to be a representation of what the phone might be capable of. And in reality, most ad campaigns for cameras are not shot on the product they are advertising (remembers famous incident where ads for Nikon DSLRs were shot with Canons).

    On the positive side, I am slowly coming around to the idea of having a fast, OIS stabilized, BSI sensor on the 920 in place of the large, supersampled FSI sensor on the 808. In low light, I believe the 920 might have an edge on the 808 (as long as the subject remains still). In bright light, even poor cameras can produce acceptable results. You may not get the fancy zooming capabilities of the 808, but the formfactor savings and low light performance may be well worth it.

      • raddude9
      • 7 years ago

      Huh, they only responded so quickly because they got caught red handed. And their apology was a weak “we sorry you were confused about what we claimed…” type of thing.

      [quote<]A representation of what the phone might be capable of[/quote<] That's apologist talk that is. [quote<]famous incident where ads for Nikon DSLRs were shot with Canons[/quote<] Just because it happened before doesn't make it acceptable now. If anything Nokia should have been more careful not to mislead.

        • Voldenuit
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<] famous incident where ads for Nikon DSLRs were shot with Canons Just because it happened before doesn't make it acceptable now. If anything Nokia should have been more careful not to mislead.[/quote<] It still happens. You think the ads for the Nikon 1 were shot on a Nikon 1? I do agree that there is a higher standard that companies can strive for, and nokia may have failed that on the first go but they responded promptly and responsibly by apologizing for any misdirection and posting a real sample from the phone within 1 day of receiving said complaints.

        • rxc6
        • 7 years ago

        Well, I am still waiting for Apple to get flamed because Siri doesn’t work as well as in the ads. I guess that will never happen.

      • End User
      • 7 years ago

      Nokia faked their still photos as well [url<]http://goo.gl/ke7o7[/url<]

        • Voldenuit
        • 7 years ago

        Hehe, nice find.

        The device might still be quite capable, for instance the pictures taken at the press event in their darkbox (although journalists were only allowed to compare the images on the respective screens of the smartphones).

        As with any tech product, it’s always best to wait for the reviews rather than promotional media.

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          The Verge has some photo comparisons between S3, Lumia 920, iPhone etc.

          [url<]http://www.theverge.com/2012/9/7/3299784/nokia-lumia-920-pureview-camera-hi-res-photos[/url<]

        • rxc6
        • 7 years ago

        At least this video isn’t fake:
        [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6bfY_KbXRFY[/url<] Go to 2:24. It is not even close to a fair fight.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]In low light, I believe the 920 might have an edge on the 808 (as long as the subject remains still).[/quote<] What? Thats crazy talk. In low light the image stabilized lens might be handy, but assuming that camera motion is not a problem, it pretty much comes down to how large (and modern) the sensors are. The 808 has a [i<]large[/i<] and fancy sensor. You're crazy if you expect the 920 to have a better camera than the 808.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 7 years ago

        Reply to self: the 808 sensor is 1/1.2″ or about 10.8 x 7.5mm, the 920 sensor is 1/3″ sensor or 5.0 x 3.5mm. Do the math, thats 81.0 mm squared vs 17.5 mm squared, or 4.6x as large.

        Interestingly, the pixels are almost exactly the same size on each sensor, so you can expect that susceptibility of individual pixels to noise will be similar, except that the 808 can bin pixels at nearly 5-to-1 and match the maximum resolution of the 920. Thats a pretty overwhelming advantage in favor of 808.

          • Voldenuit
          • 7 years ago

          Actually, the math works out pretty even. The 808 sensor is ~2.2 stops better than the 920 in terms of light-gathering area. On the other hand, the 920 lens is ~ 0.5 stops faster than the 808. Add in OIS, which (judging by industry performance) should give youat least an extra 2 or more stops in shutter speed, and you pretty much break even. And on top of that the 920 is BSI vs the FSI on the 808, which should let in more light to the sensor per pixel site.

          Naturally, I’ve made some simplifying assumptions; I’ve disregarded the 808’s ability to lower the noise floor with pixel binning, for instance, but when I did the math, they came out pretty even, at least for low light ability. No doubt the 808 would blow away the 920 when it comes to resolving detail in good light, and it will be less noisy in low light video (though not stabilized). But for low light stills and stabilized video, the 920 isn’t looking as gimped as I thought it would when I first heard the specs.

            • trackerben
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]...But for low light stills and stabilized video, the 920 isn't looking as gimped as I thought it would...[/quote<] For those with young school-going kids that should cover more than half of all situations.

            • Voldenuit
            • 7 years ago

            Real world [url=http://www.theverge.com/2012/9/7/3299784/nokia-lumia-920-pureview-camera-hi-res-photos<]low light comparison of the 920[/url<] at the verge. Obviously not as impressive as the faked PR shots, but still very impressive. Capturing mode detail than the competition and pretty good dynamic range. The 808 is not as noisy, but also not as detailed and much less DR (could be a function of the exposure settings).

    • Madman
    • 7 years ago

    I wonder how much built-in spyware there will be, and how much personal data sharing/mining this device will do out of the box.

      • rxc6
      • 7 years ago

      Spyware? If you considered the whole OS to be spyware, then you’d have a point. For personal data sharing/mining I am sure you can turn that off. WP gives you the ability to uninstall any third party app. Android carries a lot of bloatware from the carriers that you can’t get rid of.

        • Madman
        • 7 years ago

        Not OS, but Carrier IQ and shit.

        Seems that applications assume they have a duty and rights to share everything about you without even asking.

        And you don’t even have a way to turn off or find about such services without good technical background and research.

      • LaChupacabra
      • 7 years ago

      I think the real question here is who do you trust more with your data? Microsoft, Apple or Google. 5 years ago that would have been an easy question to answer. Now? I think the answer is not so simple.

        • Madman
        • 7 years ago

        I would say the answer is pretty simple, I don’t trust any of these companies anymore.

        The question is, what can we do when we have no alternatives…

          • Arclight
          • 7 years ago

          Yes you do have alternatives. Just buy an old model phone that you use only for making phonecalls and text msgs and buy a small form factor tablet for mobile entertainment.

            • Madman
            • 7 years ago

            Actually no. If you want to keep up with the progress, you really don’t.

            If you need a device with a web browser, camera, image viewer, pdf reader, and a tethering capability, you have to get a smart-phone.

            Ok, there is a way. Cyanogenmod fixes the problem for some Android devices, and that’s what I use. But for most devices, there is simply no choice. Either you take it in a butt like a champ, or you stay behind technological improvements, and loose a competitive edge against people who use modern helpers.

            Same with DRM and cloud nowadays. There is simply no choice. Sorry for mentioning DRM in this discussion.

    • GeorgeMichael
    • 7 years ago

    there’s one problem with these Nokia phones and that problem is Winphone8.
    As long as they use Winphone8 they won’t sell like the rest.

      • tejas84
      • 7 years ago

      @georgemichael

      Weren’t you caught doing lewd acts to a cop in a public toilet a few years back??? Anything you say can’t possibly be taken seriously.

      Windows Phone 8 is a perfectly good OS and Samsung and Verizon seem to dig it as well as HTC and Nokia.

      People want an alternative to iOS ripoff that is Android with its terrible fragmentation.

        • GeorgeMichael
        • 7 years ago

        The only alternative to IOS is WEBOS.

          • rxc6
          • 7 years ago

          Tell that to HP…

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]People want an alternative to iOS ripoff that is Android with its terrible fragmentation.[/quote<] ...and the market share is...

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          me, and those 4 other guys.

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 7 years ago

            There are dozens of us, dozens!

          • Arag0n
          • 7 years ago

          People also wants an alternative to Windows on desktops despite having a 90% of marketshare…. Android is no good and I believe Android will back-fire google at the end because the hardware issues, fragmentation and all will provide a pretty poor experience to users, just as lazy and crappy oems destroyed Windows reputation.

            • BabelHuber
            • 7 years ago

            Yeah, Android has massive problems: The installed base is only 480 Million devices, and they are only activating an additional 1.3 Million devices per day.

            Nokia, OTOH, sold 7 Million Lumias from Q4 2011 to Q2 2012 (according to Stephen Elop himself), while Samsung only sold 20 Million SGS3 the first 100 days after release.

            A tough problem for Google is China, BTW: It is the biggest and fastest growing smartphone market in the world, and Android’s market share is only 81%!

            Conclusion: WP does fine, while Android is in dire straits.

            • trackerben
            • 7 years ago

            If Microsoft’s installed base had 95% permanently stuck on versions of Windows prior to 7 and are still activating an additional million new XP licenses daily, then by your terms this would surely mean massive success.

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 7 years ago

            “permanently” = 2 years when they get a new phone.

            And yes, people still make sure their programs work on XP, which helps MS keep an iron grip on the ecosystem.

            • trackerben
            • 7 years ago

            When people buy a new PC it usually comes available with the latest Windows 7,,most droids sold still come with Android 2.x. Apps compatibility is important to keeping people interested in the ecosystem and timely OS upgrades are important to keeping people buying in it, but most androids out there cannot be updated past 2.x, the equivalent of most PCs being non-upgradable to Windows 7. Some would consider such a constrainng framework a success. Not many would be found at Microsoft, Apple, or evn Nokia these days.

            • BabelHuber
            • 7 years ago

            Most of the top-of-the-line phones from 2011 are already runnung on 4.0 (e.g. SGS2), the 2012 phones like the HTC One X and the SGS3 are shipping with 4.0.

            The only phones which still have 2.3 are:
            – Outdated phones
            – Cheap phones
            – Phones with special hardware like the Galaxy Beam

            But customers who walk in a store in September 2012 and buy a phone with Android 2.3 couldn’t care less which Android version is running, otherwise they wouldn’t buy it.

            OTOH each Android phone can be updated, since Android is an open system.

            I have 4.04 running on my original Samsung Galaxy Tab from 2010, my SGS2 runs 4.11

            So, the conclusion is: You can install any Android version, as long as you care about such things. If you don’t, you simply use whatever ships with the phone. If you buy a pricier model, you get updates nevertheless.

            So there is nothing wrong with Android, only some people confusing advantages with disadvantages.

            • trackerben
            • 7 years ago

            As of today, more than 95% of droids are permanently stuck on versions of Android prior to 3.x There’s no getting around the fact that most droids sold today are not “top-of-the-line” models, but mid-end and low-end models sporting 2.3.x. or less, which by your definition are:

            1) Outdated
            2) Cheap
            3) Specially Hardware Reliant

            So these cheap, outdated, special-hardware droids are being bought anyway by non-discriminating types who are tragically clueless on the issues behind Android market fragmention.

            But, you claim, “…each Android phone can be updated”, which In my experience is not likely for that vast majority of Outdated, Cheap, Special Hardware reliant droids which people buy because you think”…they don’t care.”

            And you say there is nothing wrong with Android, only with the people using it.

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]As of today, more than 95% of droids are permanently stuck on versions of Android prior to 3.x[/quote<] As of today, more than 40% of Windows machines still run XP. XP is even older than Gingerbread. Does MS have a fragmentation problem? In 2 years, they'll all be buying new phones, so this "problem" will go way quickly. You can write one app that works on 2.3, 4.0 and 4.1. As of today, more than 99% of Windows Phones permanently stuck on WP7. And that's a real permanent, as any Droid phone could theoretically be upgraded.

            • trackerben
            • 7 years ago

            Which is why few at Microsoft, Apple, or even Nokia would consider such a constraining framework a success. Google’s Android has different standards or is just mired in development, it is widely assumed.

            That Windows Phone and 95% of all droids are both stuck in upgrade limbo is a travesty. Once you eliminate these 99% of limbo WP7s and 95-99% of limbo droids you essentially have parity in the ability to set new high standards in features and build quality.

            • BabelHuber
            • 7 years ago

            Where do ou get this 95%-number from? I would bet money that this is pure BS.

            Here you have a list of all devices which are supported by the CM mod alone:

            [url<]http://get.cm[/url<] And this is just Cynogen Mod! There are a ton of mods out there! You can personally dyslike Android and buy something else, I have no problem with this whatsoever. But to claim that 95% of devices are non-upgradeable, or to state that the most widely used mobile OS with the highest growth rate and the biggest installed base is a failure is simply stupid. Android is the most successful mobile OS these days period. Deal with it, that's reality.

            • trackerben
            • 7 years ago

            Last June, the number of US-origin droids running 4.x was reportedly around 7%, based on market data analyzed by ComScore.
            [url<]http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2012/06/android-market-share-stalls-version-4-0-sees-a-7-percent-install-base/[/url<] Google reports somewhat higher percentages visiting their appstore. Internationally, it is believed that fewer droids would be sporting 4.x given the vagaries of data connections elsewhere. So I charitably put the global estimate at around 5%. If you apply that against a base total of between 420 to 500 million droids in the wild, you get a range of 21-25 million units running at least 4.x. Given that Samsung has shipped the overwhelming majority of 4.x droids, almost 20 million units of high-end Galaxy Ss', a quick-and-dirty sensitivity analysis shows that %ICS estimate to be within ballpark. It is going higher according to recent sales trends but likely not that much higher given the historical slow uptake of Android upgrades. [quote<]...to claim that 95% of devices are non-upgradeable, or to state that the most widely used mobile OS with the highest growth rate and the biggest installed base is a failure is simply stupid.[/quote<] [url<]http://www.techspot.com/guides/534-android-40-ics-availability/[/url<] When you have entire blogs and articles dedicated to update and fragmentation issues, you don't have true success. Not in computing. And neither is having the biggest installed base, not unless you happen to be Samsung, but in which case you don't own that entire "biggest installed base", just your smaller but profitable part. On this ground Samsung is definitely enjoying great success in copying... err, copping Apple's lead in the market. [quote<]...Android is the most successful moble OS these days period. Deal with it, that's reality...[/quote<] Of course, by your terms.

            • BabelHuber
            • 7 years ago

            If you really think that the mobile OS with the highest market share, the biggest growth and the biggest installed base is not the most successful, then there is nothing to talk about.

            Either you are trolling or you really do think that success is not defined by hard numbers, but by rdiculous criterias like yours. In this case, you are beyond help.

            Add to this that you are BSing with your weird inks. See here:

            [url<]http://www.androidauthority.com/android-4-ics-market-share-september-2012-112841/[/url<] 4.0+ is on 22.1% of all Android devices. The current insalled base is 480 Millions (all devices), that makes ca. 100 Million devices with 4.0+ Also, you have not backed up your number of 95% of all devices being unupgradable. Pur BS, nothing more.

            • trackerben
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]If you really think that the mobile OS with the highest market share, the biggest growth and the biggest installed base is not the most successful, then there is nothing to talk about...[/quote<] If you tire of me, you can talk to someone in the industry. They will tell you that the global mobile OS which meets two of the three measures you give for success - highest market share, biggest installed base is - is Nokia's venerable S40. They will also tell you that the mobile OS with the biggest current growth prospects is iOS. This will be more evident after the launch of the upcoming iPhone 5 and iPad Air / iPad TV. The numbers which owners, managers, bankers, and analysts are most likely to agree on as the best measure of market success is long-run rate of return on assets NETT IFRS, analyzed on stakeholder and competitive hurdle rates against industry and regulatory-sovereign risks. The major brands which show a viable history resulting from their participation in Android marketing would only be Samsung and indirectly, Google. Apple is currently the exemplary standard in most of the measures mentioned. Its healthy FS and balances and its enviable pro-formas are prospects directly attributable to its unprecedentedly competent and profitable evolution of the iOS ecosystem. [quote<]...Add to this that you are BSing with your weird inks...[/quote<] I believe the people at Ars would beg to disagree. And did I not post that Google reports somewhat higher figures based on visits to its appstore? The percentage of 4.x devices connecting to Google may be high, but then so may be the percentage of lesser devices not connecting to Google. Or that of devices regressed as a result of poor upgrade experiences. But then how could Google determine these hidden negatives from their set of positives? Maybe someone here can explain how Google's marketers can infer high uptake rates from statistical analyses of an operationally sparse dataset. [quote<]...Also, you have not backed up your number of 95% of all devices being unupgradable...[/quote<] I hope you don't think that I'm arguing about the technical non-availability of upgrades. What I'm seeing is mostly market non-availability. The 95% majority of mainstream droids just aren't getting further official upgrades. Anyway, the situation is worse than most would realize. More than mere technical or contractual issues, we are faced with manufacturers who won't or can't upgrade their stance and who are incentivized to do much the opposite due to Google's indifference.

            • BabelHuber
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<] you tire of me, you can talk to someone in the industry. They will tell you that the global mobile OS which meets two of the three measures you give for success - highest market share, biggest installed base is - is Nokia's venerable S40.[/quote<] 'Most people in the industry' will tell you that S40 is not a smartphone OS. [quote<]The numbers which owners, managers, bankers, and analysts are most likely to agree on as the best measure of market success is long-run rate of return on assets NETT IFRS, analyzed on stakeholder and competitive hurdle rates against industry and regulatory-sovereign risks.[/quote<] Blabla. Which 'bankers, and analysts' say that? Do they say this specifically for the smartphone market? A market which is in a rapid growth-phase, where gaining market share is more important than shortsighted quarterly profit numbers? The market which you can still milk after it gets saturated and when you are one of the big players there, then? 'Some analysts' (since you don't provide links, I skip them, too) are exactly critizing Apple for this. [quote<]The 95% majority of mainstream droids just aren't getting further official upgrades.[/quote<] Do you think your BS 95%-quote gets more reliable when you repeat it more often? People interested in upgrading can update most models, be it officially or with a ROM. Those who don't care don't care anyways. If a user is fine with his 2.3-device and can run all Apps he wants, he just does not care! Is this so hard to get?

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            you might have some legitimate disagreements with him, but he is right about the 95%, and provided links from a few months ago, with legitimate expectations on the international market. You should probably pick a different angle.

            I’d agree with you that android is so far the most successful os, not the best, by ANY stretch, but certainly the compatible. so far though, trackerben is beating the pants off of you.

            • trackerben
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]'Most people in the industry' will tell you that S40 is not a smartphone OS...[/quote<] Historically, it is the world's most successful mobile OS. It outsells all droids and iphones ever, combined with a total active base nearing 2Billion. It's just not delivering as much profits as before, which is still more than can be said for all droid makers other than Samsung. But keep your eyes open, check your preconceptions, be ready to evolve your views. Platforms do evolve, market perceptions do change. As of mid-2012, S40 designs can no longer be considered simple featurephones. The top Ashas 3xx models have 3" Gorilla glass touchsceens, transactionable downloads of apps from a centralized store, global baseband, wifi, and BT radios and orientation sensors, email, messaging, media player and reader suites, a cloud-optimized webkit browsing comparable to Kindle's, a filesystem open to various flash devices on USB and bluetooth. S40 has long featured a working OTA updates system that doesn't erase app data (imagine that Apple). It even comes with free Angry Birds and others from major publishers. You might resist the idea that an S40 can be a smartphone. I resisted buying one because it lacked GPS and hotspot functions just like pre-2.2.x droids, but not because it wasn't today's flavor of "smartphone". The 311 I looked at was as slick and useable as anything from Apple, and cheaper than current 2.x Androids and 7.x Blackberrys. [quote<]...Which 'bankers, and analysts' say that? Do they say this specifically for the smartphone market? A market which is in a rapid growth-phase, where gaining market share is more important than shortsighted quarterly profit numbers?..[/quote<] I would have included academics, but that would add to a named list of SEC-monitored lines of reporting and accountability already made isanely long by crazy Sarbanes-Oxley rules. This is a widely-known concept essential to business school and boardroom best practices because it benches and clarifies business models in terms of the corporate "going concern". A focus on aggressive phased capture of ground and banner objectives tends to ignore resource constraints and broad fundamentals beyond the immediate horizon. Found mainly in marketing and military conferences and advocacy. Also in the best FPS games. [quote<]...Do you think your BS 95%-quote gets more reliable when you repeat it more often?[/quote<] Not really, but repeating it for the third time makes it sound like there's conviction, eh? [quote<]...People interested in upgrading can update most models, be it officially or with a ROM. Those who don't care don't care anyways. If a user is fine with his 2.3-device and can run all Apps he wants, he just does not care! Is this so hard to get?...[/quote<] I agree with you here except for the effect of tiered fragmentation on the developer base. Many in the developer community say it raises overall development uncertainties, which in the long-term will reduce the overall capacity to deliver the broadest possible selection of great apps. Current buyers of cheap and outdated droids are likely exchanging their simple featurephones for what is essentially a more sophisticated, app-enabled featurephone. The market speaks for itself, but it does so with many voices - low-, mid-, and high-end. We all know that the middle has the greatest say in how Android is shaping out to be, and I'm happy to agree with you that many of these middling users are fine with the device level they got. If happiness and satisfaction is your measure, then these hundreds of millions of cheap 'n cheerful droid users out there have brought about a great success which would not have been possible with earlier, less visionary platforms. But I'd be happier if they and we can all do better, overall. What many droid buyers like me would prefer to hear would be a market responding with more updated products which would better ensure Android's long-term viability as a computing /comms platform. Better yet inexpensive droids are already being marketed by lesser brands in China and India and Asia inaccessible to the rest of us. What buyers of these local champions have already enjoyed, buyers of the big brands can aspire to.

            • BabelHuber
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]But keep your eyes open, check your preconceptions, be ready to evolve your views. Platforms do evolve, market perceptions do change. As of mid-2012, S40 designs can no longer be considered simple featurephones.[/quote<] Just show me a market share statistic of smartphones where Ashas are included. I haven't seen one. See, this is the problem here: I am talking about hard numbers, while you are arguing about S40 being a Smartphone OS, but you have nothing to back it up. The new Nokia Ashas may almost look like smartphones, but they are not. [quote<]A focus on aggressive phased capture of ground and banner objectives tends to ignore resource constraints and broad fundamentals beyond the immediate horizon.[/quote<] Blabla. Just copy and paste, but no substance. Show me an analyst who thinks that it is good to milk the smartphone market despite the fact that it is not yet saturated. I've actually studied economics, your copy & paste-stuff does not impress me. But since you don't seem to know how to quote, I show you how this could look like: [url<]http://communities-dominate.blogs.com/brands/2012/08/smartphone-market-shares-q2-full-numbers-samsung-and-android-solidifying-their-leads.html[/url<] [quote<]So, Apple was of course hugely profitable but here in this contest, the amount of profits is irrelevant, huge profits this quarter at the cost of winning the decade-long smartphone OS war, is very shortsighted indeed, better to optimize profit and market share to win the long game. All we want, is for the contender to be profitable in its smarpthone races, excess profits are good news for Wall Street and short-term investors but not meaningful in the Bloodbath, where long term viability is the point. So Apple gets no bonus for its massive profit haul, only that it clearly did good being profitable where many rivals are not. Apple scores a B-, a good but not excellent score. [/quote<] So, this is a real quote of a real analystm while you provide meaningless textbook definitions you have found via Google. I hope your intelligence is sufficient to notice teh difference here. [quote<]I agree with you here except for the effect of tiered fragmentation on the developer base. Many in the developer community say it raises overall development uncertainties, which in the long-term will reduce the overall capacity to deliver the broadest possible selection of great apps.[/quote<] Finally almost something sensible, congratulations! You are right, developers dyslike to support multiple versions with multiple resolutions etc. But you don't seem to get that customers couldn't care less. This is a problem which does not affect end users. What you call 'fragmentation', customers call 'abroad variety of devices to chose from', which is positive. The second part is pure speculation without substance again. While developers may dyslike what you call 'fragmentation', customers see it differently and buy Android nevertheless. When an OS has the most users, developing Apps for it is always a goof idea, even if it is complicated. For the last time I quote the hard numbers now from the link above: [quote<]IGGEST SMARTPHONE OPERATING SYSTEMS BY UNIT SALES IN Q2 2012 Rank . OS Platform . . . . . . Units . . . . . Market share . . Was in Q1 of 2012 1 . . . . Android . . . . . . . . . 102.4 M . . . . 66.9 % . . . . . . . ( 55.6 %) 2 . . . . iOS . . . . . . . . . . . . 26.0 M . . . . 17.0 % . . . . . . . ( 24.2 %) 3 . . . . Blackberry . . . . . . . . 7.8 M . . . . . 5.1 % . . . . . . . ( 7.6 %) 4 . . . . Symbian . . . . . . . . . 5.0 M . . . . . 3.3 % . . . . . . . ( 5.4 %) 5 . . . . Windows Phone . . . . 4.6 M . . . . . 3.0 % . . . . . . . ( 1.6 %) 6 . . . . bada . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.1 M . . . . . 2.7 % . . . . . . . ( 2.6 %) 7 . . . . MeeGo . . . . . . . . . . 1.2 M . . . . . 0.8 % . . . . . . . ( 1.5 %) 8 . . . . Windows Mobile . . . . 0.3 M . . . . . 0.2 % . . . . . . . ( 0.3 %) others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6 M . . . . . 1.0 % . . . . . . . ( 1.1 %) TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153.0 M Source: TomiAhonen Consulting Estimates August 15, 2012 from vendor data and other sources This table may be freely distributed[/quote<] [quote<]INSTALLED BASE OF SMARTPHONES BY OPERATING SYSTEM AS OF Q2 2012 Rank . OS Platform . . . . . . Units . . . . . Market share . . Was in Q1 of 2012 1 . . . . Android . . . . . . . . . 427 M . . . . . 41 % . . . . . . . . ( 32 %) 2 . . . . Symbian . . . . . . . . 259 M . . . . . 25 % . . . . . . . . ( 30 %) 3 . . . . iOS . . . . . . . . . . . 198 M . . . . . 19 % . . . . . . . . ( 18 %) 4 . . . . Blackberry . . . . . . 108 M . . . . . 10 % . . . . . . . . ( 11 %) 5 . . . . bada . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 M . . . . . 2 % . . . . . . . . ( 2 %) 6 . . . . Windows Phone . . . . 14 M . . . . . 1 % . . . . . . . . ( 1 %) 7 . . . . Windows Mobile . . . . 13 M . . . . 1 % . . . . . . . . ( 2 %) Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 M . . . . . 2 % . . . . . . . . ( 3 %) TOTAL Installed Base . . . 1,059 M smartphones in use at end of Q2 2012 Source: TomiAhonen Consulting Estimates August 15, 2012 from vendor data and other sources This table may be freely distributed[/quote<] Android does not seem like an OS most developers can ignore because they don't like it - at least if they want to make some money.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]Nokia, OTOH, sold 7 Million Lumias from Q4 2011 to Q2 2012 (according to Stephen Elop himself), while Samsung only sold 20 Million SGS3 the first 100 days after release.[/quote<] Meanwhile the next iPhone is projected to hit 10 Million sales in 1 week.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            sure. can you remind me what android vs apple’s phone market share is again?

            • End User
            • 7 years ago

            I’m sure you can find the official sales numbers from all the Android manufacturers and come up with the acurate market share numbers yourself.

            While you’re at it you can present us with the acurate tablet market share numbers as well.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            sure, but i expect that in 5 years the ipad will be in a similar position to how the iphone is now, 5 years later. hugely profitable, but falling market share.

            • Beelzebubba9
            • 7 years ago

            …and I’m pretty sure Apple will be fine with that market position as well. Which would you rather have – 75% market share or 75% of the profits?

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            i’m not saying it’s a bad thing. Deajo was.

            • End User
            • 7 years ago

            Nice one. You failed to answer my question and just made up stuff about something that has not occurred.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            what? you had a question?

            • End User
            • 7 years ago

            I’m still waiting for your rock solid numbers.

      • Arag0n
      • 7 years ago

      I will buy the Nokia 920 before Christmas. Why? Because it has the best screen, the best camera (of any smartphone with no-dead OS), the most sensitive touch screen, the only phone with built-in wireless charger, the best looking outlook (IMO of course) and ALSO BECAUSE IT´S WP8.

      If nokia was not in the game I would buy an ATIV S because it´s the best option available for WP8. Sure for many WP8 means a switch from Android or iOS but I happen to be invested in WP7 and be a indy game developer for WP7. And before you bully my decision I’ll tell you: I make more money in one day of WP revenue than in a month of Android.

        • raddude9
        • 7 years ago

        So you’re not even going to wait for a few reviews, that’s fanboi talk that is.

        Is the screen really the best, it’s not the biggest or the most pixeley!
        Is it too sensitive?
        Does the wireless charging work as well as plugging it in?

        I could go on, but you get the idea.
        Anyway, now that they have borked the upgrade path from WP7 wouldn’t this be a good time to let your WP7 investment die away, rather than throwing good money after bad, after all the last 5 or 6 versions of wm/p have only lost microsoft smartphone market share and there’s no indication that this will turn things around..

          • Arag0n
          • 7 years ago

          Read better, I’m app developer making money from WP. I need a WP8 device no matter what and between the ATIV S and the 920 there is no contest, and also, I would like to support nokia because he supports the market I work for much better than Samsung does. So actually, the L920 will end being free for me cuz it will be paid with my apps/games revenue in a very short time.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            OK, so in your case buying a Windows Phone is a no-brainer, but your comment has zero use to the rest of us who are trying to figure out what’s the best choice for us.

            • raddude9
            • 7 years ago

            I get it now, you’re going for the Big Fish in a Small Pond approach as opposed to the more common Small Fish in a Big Pond idea. Not a bad idea, I know a friend-of-a-friend who makes plenty of money on Blackberry Playbook apps, but he’s never going to make it big!

            So essentially you’re saying that you’re going for the Nokia [b<]because[/b<] it is unpopular and not likely to get more popular any time soon.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        what’s your app?

          • no51
          • 7 years ago

          Slighty Miffed Poultry.

        • End User
        • 7 years ago

        Yikes. I’m thinking about all that iOS revenue that you are missing out on.

        How is the WP8 SDK working out for you?

          • Arag0n
          • 7 years ago

          Just for your amusement, I’m already planning to port to iOS and use my WP7 user base as advertisers of my games. WP7 players may be phew but they have friends with iOS devices. They can recommend my games to iOS users and I don’t have to invest in ads for iOS.

          However, I still see Win8 as a much better business chance since I can get my app to the top easily and if I make it soon enough, I will just keep that top spot for months if not years. Even if the market is small and stays small for months after launch, you still can expect several thousands of downloads at around ~0.1$ per download.

          I’m not as closed minded as you are…. you as most of people only know to support what is already big, you can’t see how you can make money with what it’s not big yet. That’s something that Steve Jobs saw with the iPhone. If you asked before the iPhone everyone in the industry would tell you that only executives use smartphones and consumers won’t pay more than 400$ for phones just to have email, browser and some games in their phone. However, Steve Jobs saw the interest, saw the opportunity and created the market. In the other hand, you have Google. They tried to create an alternative to Windows with Google Chrome OS but the fact remains that, you can’t try to outperform an already established market without going after some niche part. That’s why Macbooks succeded too. Steve Jobs knew when he decided to make popular their products in graphics designers crowds and artists, and still, they needed the iPhone and iPad success to work as advertisements for their Laptops quality.

          So that’s my 2c to you: at least that you have a great chance in front of you, don’t try to go for the biggest. Try to go for a niche that is unserved, create your own reputation and customers and then try to play bigger. Trying to go for the biggest market where everyone is usually means you are at the very bottom with no chance to go up.

            • BabelHuber
            • 7 years ago

            Your strategy seems a little bit weird to me – internationally, as of Q2 2012, you have an installed base of 420 Million Androids vs. 200 Millions on iOS vs. 14 Million WPs.

            We know that Google activates an additional 1.3 Million Android-devices per day (Monday through Sunday, BTW), so not expecting WP to catch up is not ‘close-minded’ in my book, but realistic thinking.

            WP8 would have to have something that customers really desire to catch up, and I do not see this.

            Bit I wish you luck with your strategy nevertheless!

            • Arag0n
            • 7 years ago

            The problem with iOS and Android is that is extremely hard that this equation is true:

            revenue per user – price per click * downloads/click = benefit

            You can get unlimited users almost in Android and iOS but it’s extremely hard to actually earn money from those users. You need to invest more money than you actually get from them, that’s because ad networs usually redistribute only 50% of the adspending and most of the money ends going to big studios that can support much better games than any indie developer will ever can. You may try to get a team of 10 people to get a full game with all the things required to get a proper release but at the end it’s not possible to get 10 persons working for free synchronized. So, you need some income sources that you can use to invest to improve your games step by step.

            And then, you have windows phone. Windows phone lacks plenty if not most of heavy invested game releases. That means that there is a hole for indie developers to shine.

            Then, you have 14 million WP (more like 20 million right now), still you have 20/(640) = 3.125%. People usually have at least 2 or 3 friends in average. That means that you can reach between a 6.25 to 9.375% of the market advertising on Windows Phone and actually make money in the process.

            The real problem of Windows Phone is that the users population is limited. So I can’t just re-invest my income in more ads and keep my growing exponential as I could do in iOS given an app where the previous equation was positive. That’s why I’m trying to move to other platforms as a way to capitalize users word of mouth, since it’s harder a WP user recommends a game to another WP user than a WP user to an iPhone user. But still, I won’t spend money advertising on iPhone.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            what’s your game!!!!!!!!!

            • Arag0n
            • 7 years ago

            I sent a PM for you in the forums, I’m not sure it’s good to public say what’s my game.

            • End User
            • 7 years ago

            The name of your game is top secret? Doesn’t that go against your “They can recommend my games to iOS users and I don’t have to invest in ads for iOS” strategy?

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            i think he’s worried about jerks on here being jerks, which is valid.

            • End User
            • 7 years ago

            So true.

            • HallsMint
            • 7 years ago

            What about us other Windows Phone users on here that want to play your game? Are you going to send us a PM, too??

            • Arag0n
            • 7 years ago

            Why not? You got PM too. There is so much troll here.

            • Voldenuit
            • 7 years ago

            Does developing for WP8 automatically give you something that will work in WinRT and ModernUI? Not just coding, but publishing. If the bar for entry is low enough, that’s a huge potential for customers when Windows 8 comes out.

            I would go for the 920 as well, despite not being a developer. It stings that the 820 has the SD card and the 920 doesn’t, but the build quality, display, camera and bigger battery are worth it for me. As for the ATIV, I think Samsung phones have great displays and internals (bought my wife a Galaxy S2), but the build quality is nowhere near good enough for my (ab)use. I’ve never had a nokia physically* break on me. Motorolas and Philipses, yes, but never a nokia.

            * Software-wise, I’ve been lucky too, but I’ve heard plenty of horror stories about bugs in the Lumia 900, and I was careful to wait a couple months for nokia to fix the power-on bug in the N8 before buying.

            • Arag0n
            • 7 years ago

            The WP8 SDK has not been released yet. I can tell you that games I paid for WP7 and are available also in the Win8 Store are not automatically free. Seems that the store between phones & tablets-pc is going to be separated for now, not unlikely to what happens in apple world with the mac store and appstore.

            The differences between coding apps for win8 amd wp7 is very small. Both apps are based in the same language and turn around the same coding metaphor. Most API’s are placed in different libraries or work slightly different, but most of code between Windows and Windows Phone 7 is the same, so you should expect little tweaks between WP8 and Win8 apps later, so if Win8 succeeds getting top-tier games and apps, WP8 will too most likely.

            • End User
            • 7 years ago

            As of March 2012 iOS had an installed base of 360 million.

            • End User
            • 7 years ago

            So 5 years after your hero Steve Jobs created “the market” you still have not developed anything for iOS? THAT is closed minded.

    • drfish
    • 7 years ago

    The 920 isn’t perfect but I sure want one. Looking forward to seeing what other phones will be options but this is my front runner so far.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 7 years ago

    No SD slot in the 920 may have ‘defiled the design’ but it also lost them them possible sales for people who won’t buy a phone without it. SD support is one of the major improvements of WP8 and Nokia’s flapship product doesn’t have it. A little flip door cover would have defiled the design? Please. It’s got a micro SIM slot somewhere so I’m calling total b.s. on the ‘defiled design’ bit.

    When you’re dominant in a market you can force design tradeoffs down people’s throats, when you’re struggling for sales you need to appeal to as many people as possible.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 7 years ago

      My droid 2 has a micro-SD slot under the battery.

      Is it annoying to get to? Yes. Am I still glad it’s there? Yes.

      No “defiling” necessary.

      • gamoniac
      • 7 years ago

      My Samsung Galaxy has a microSD slot. I sticked an 8GB card in there two years ago and have not removed it since. Neither have I replaced the battery, and I don’t particular take care of my battery — I charge my phone any time I get a chance instead of waiting for it to be almost empty.

      I previously swore that I would never buy a phone without an microSD slot or replaceable battery (eg. iPhone), but Apple might have proven me wrong. 32GB might not be an option for someone looking for more storage space but it would be plenty of space for me.

        • rado992
        • 7 years ago

        Actually, charging lithium batteries from about 40% up extends their life significantly compared to draining them completely every single time before charging. So your random habits might actually be preserving your battery. 😉 As for the microSD, my experience is more or less the same – stuck an 8GB card in my Galaxy S2 and forgot about it. Together with the internal storage the space is plenty for now and if I ever want more, I can change the card easily enough. IMO this is the right way to do it, the S2 doesn’t have the easiest acess to the battery and microSD, but they are still user-replaceable.

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]No SD slot in the 920 may have 'defiled the design' but it also lost them them possible sales for people who won't buy a phone without it.[/quote<] That's me. I only buy defiled phones

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        Yeah but you want them defiled because of this on the back: [url<]http://logodatabases.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/intel-inside-logo.jpg[/url<]

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          sick, isn’t it?

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          Hey, that’s pretty cute! It has all the pretty Finland flag colors

      • XDravond
      • 7 years ago

      I’m with you on this. More SD slots to the people….

      It’s just so annoying that you can with a lower “ranked” phone (like the 820) get a lot more storage than on the flagship one. And I don’t want to stream every thing I have “mobile data” is expensive and mostly slow… The 920 had most things I could directly think of when saying no to the 800/900 but misses out on a simple effin sd slot…. I’m waiting to check out WP8 just because it gets sd-card support and what do I/(we) get a flagshipfail.

      (Ok I’m still interested but not as much..)

    • Ricardo Dawkins
    • 7 years ago

    So; Nokia how do I replace my 80GB Zune w/o microsd slot? arrgghhh!

    ATIV S looking better. Hope Samsung keeps the same Wolfsom DAC as the Galaxy S3.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      the 820 has an sd slot.

      • no51
      • 7 years ago

      ATIV S is also fricken’ huge. I’m sure one can get used to it.

      edit: boo censorship.

      • rxc6
      • 7 years ago

      The cheap plastic feeling of every Samsung phone makes it a no go for me. I prefer my N9 and the 920. The thin layer of aluminum bonded to the plastic back is not doing it for me.

        • Ricardo Dawkins
        • 7 years ago

        yeah, I know.
        – Owner of the original Galaxy S (Vibrant)

    • steelcity_ballin
    • 7 years ago

    Time will tell but I expect these to under-sale and then never be heard from again.

      • cjava2
      • 7 years ago

      Calling it: Nokia will get bought out or go out of business within 2 years.

        • destroy.all.monsters
        • 7 years ago

        I’d say 5 but I agree with you. Depends on how soon MS buys them out.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 7 years ago

        Or they stay in business as patent trolls.

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          Maybe they’ll turn into Patent Police; smack down those who frivolously sue others

    • cjava2
    • 7 years ago

    I think Windows 8 phones will flop. The tiles are such a waste of space. It makes the phone look like a Fisher Price toy.

      • willmore
      • 7 years ago

      I don’t know. They say the age at which people get smart phones is going down. My three year old really loves that yellow one. It’ll match her newly painted toenails.

      • obarthelemy
      • 7 years ago

      The tiles seems to be just like a iPhone’s icons, not like Andoird’s widgets ? They don’t display actual content, just dumb counts (unread msgs…) at best ?

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        no, they display content, they’ll update with the weather, show emails, alerts, etc. they’ll show whatever they’re programmed to.

          • Madman
          • 7 years ago

          Ads, ads, ads and more ads!!! WIINING!

          • obarthelemy
          • 7 years ago

          I’ve been googling Windows Phone 8 Live Tiles, I’m not seeing tiles with actual mail headers/sender/first line, spanning the whole scrren width…, nor a weekly calendar, with a column per day and time/header for meets…

          Maybe it’s just not been done yet ?

            • Sargent Duck
            • 7 years ago

            No, they won’t show email headings or that level of detail, but if you get 2 emails in your inbox, the tile will display a “2” beside the email tile. Or if you miss a call, the tile will show a “1” beside the phone tile. The “people” tiles will show different avatars from your network of people that they’ve chosen for their MSN/Facebook accounts. The “pictures” tiles will rotate pictures from your gallery every couple of seconds.

            3rd parties can program thier tiles how they see fit. For example, the weather network tile will show the temperature and a weather icon (clouds, rainy, sunny).

            It won’t get to the level of detail you’re looking for.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            not accurate. windows phone 8 will display that stuff. see the video here:

            [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=25DKXGKblOw&feature=player_embedded[/url<]

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 7 years ago

          So just like Android widgets then?

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            yep. pretty much like them.

      • ub3r
      • 7 years ago

      And if it does succeed, they will end up getting sued by apple..

        • destroy.all.monsters
        • 7 years ago

        They have a deal in place and have cross-licensed their patents. Plus they’ve gotten together to purchase patents together (three guesses as to their target. I’ll give a hint – it starts with G).

    • jjj
    • 7 years ago

    Their biggest mistake with the 920 is that they recycled that design again,like doing it the last time wasn’t bad enough.It not only makes the phone fat and heavy but the average Joe will see the same old phone in the store window,instead of something new that makes him curious.
    No SD is always a deal breaker for me but then again i hate the WP square salad and it’s nauseating colours so i wouldn’t buy it anyway.
    Other than that the device might be quite nice,wireless charging is a big plus and the floating lens tech might just help a lot, we’ll see real tests soon enough.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<] The great thing with the 920 is that they recycled that design again.It not only makes the phone strong, stylish, and durable, but the average Joe will see that unique looking phone in the store window, instantly making him curious. No SD on the 920 is always a deal breaker for me, but it is available on the 820. but then again i personally prefer static icons, like we've had since the late 80's, as i'm opposed to useful changes. the device might be quite nice,wireless charging is a big plus and the floating lens tech might just help a lot, we'll see real tests soon enough! [/quote<] ftfy

      • rxc6
      • 7 years ago

      I don’t know what you are smoking, but the design of the 920 is a big selling point for me. It builds on the n9/800 which won a lot of design awards.

      Furthermore, I haven’t seen the same desing in the iphone 4s getting in the way of sales of those devices…

    • sweatshopking
    • 7 years ago

    the 920, like the 900 and 800 before it, don’t have removable batteries, nor do they have anyway of opening.

      • tfp
      • 7 years ago

      Odd no one else does that with cell phones, this one item will surely make the 920 fail.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        except, of course the number 1 selling phone in the world, the iphone, as well as htc’s flagship phones, the One series, and bajillion other phones.

          • destroy.all.monsters
          • 7 years ago

          It’s environmentally unconscionable no matter who does it.

            • Helmore
            • 7 years ago

            In what way? Because I’m not entirely seeing your point. Might just be me being a little sleepy :S.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            because when your battery sucks, your phone is pretty much garbage.

            • destroy.all.monsters
            • 7 years ago

            Because batteries can be recycled, but not if they’re glued to the case and not removable. Typically Batteries are highly toxic and the lead in them can be reused. Placing it in landfill means that eventually it gets into nearby groundwater. A secondary point is that making a phone with a non-removable battery makes it obvious that it’s disposable and therefore more likely to be thrown in the trash. E-waste and batteries are generally recycled separately and it is more difficult to recycle safely.

            If you want to see how tech gear (motherboards and the like) are recycled in China (where much of it is shipped off to) see Manufactured Landscapes. [url<]http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0832903/[/url<]

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            i can appreciate that. i’m not saying it’s right, just that other phones do it. personally, i LIKE replaceable batteries.

            • destroy.all.monsters
            • 7 years ago

            I didn’t think you were evangelizing for non-removable batteries. I wanted to make the point clear that it isn’t whether it’s Nokia that does it or Apple or whoever (and thereby feeding people’s individual feelings about various companies) – it’s that it’s being done at all.

            • Voldenuit
            • 7 years ago

            The Lumia 900 battery can be removed, but it’s a [url=http://wmpoweruser.com/nokia-lumia-900-battery-and-screen-replacement-demoed-on-video/<]hair-raising experience[/url<]. You'll need a pin, a philips screwdriver, a torx screwdriver, a suction cup (!), a plastic knife (!!) and a pair of big brass cojones. The Nokia N8 also had a "non serviceable" battery, but was a lot easier to replace; you just needed a torx screwdriver. 808 has its battery under a snap-off cover. The good news is that all the above phones had standard batteries that were not soldered in place, unlike the iphones, so are less daunting to remove and/or replace, even if by only a little in the case of the Lumia 900.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            Fortunately SSK at least has the last required item on your list.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            I AM THE LEADER OF THE HON CLAN “GIANT BALLS”

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            What’s “HON”?

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            Heroes of Newerth.

          • tfp
          • 7 years ago

          Really? Are you sure there are other phones like this already?

        • destroy.all.monsters
        • 7 years ago

        I don’t think this is one of the reasons that it might fail. The ram issue for the 920 might be, the OS might be, and the lack of popularity for the brand might be – but as ssk pointed out many companies are doing this now.

        That’s what I get for including a definitive.

      • Arclight
      • 7 years ago

      If that’s true, then someone just made a big mistake. Considering how fast smarphone batteries drain, if you get a bad one and can’t replace it after the warranty expires then you’re screwed. Well f*ck that

      • bfar
      • 7 years ago

      This is a step backwards; ten years ago all nokia phones had removable batteries. A smart phone with a built in battery is a 2 year device – less in some cases. Consumers know this; the issue is that carriers are offering 2+ year contracts now, so that at the very least, the phone should last as long as that. A high end phone should really have a 5 year life span.

      The lack of sd card slot is very worrying too – the 920 is supposed to be the flag ship phone, so why has a feature been removed? I noticed google also pulled this caper on the Nexus 7. I suppose Skydrive will help to some extent, but I suspect this is a Microsoft ploy to get us to purchase lots of online media.

      Nokia_920 + removable_battery + sd_card_slot == God_Phone

      It’s not a total disaster, but it’s disappointing to see Microsoft/Nokia set aside features/options that would have set them apart from Apple.

    • StuG
    • 7 years ago

    I really want the 920 to come to T-Mobile. If it does I would highly consider getting it as I would really like to try an alternative to Android.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      it likely will, the 710 has been a great seller for tmobile, as they’ve stated many times.

      • chµck
      • 7 years ago

      I’m sure there will be some factory unlocked ones available through amazon/ebay.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This