Friday night topic: Working weird

The rise of the Internet, the ubiquity of high-speed access, and the fact that I run a website have all combined to make my day-to-day life incredibly . . . strange.

Although the business runs well and I remain constantly connected to the rest of the TR staff, I essentially work at home. I have no commute, and the only co-worker I see in person with regularity is my wife, who keeps the books. When I’m in crunch mode on a big review, I may hardly emerge from the house for days on end. I have no dress code, no specific set of work hours, and I define my own path to success from day to day. I know in many ways this is a privileged lifestyle, and if anything, the lack of structure has caused me to put in more time, not less, than the typical 40-hour work week.

There’s no escaping this fact, though: compared to my parents’ generation, or even to my own early career life, this arrangement is outright bizarre. I never really envisioned a work life quite like this one, and I sometimes wonder what my neighbors think when they see me, yet again, going for a walk in a T-shirt and shorts in the middle of the day. Heck, my kids have no real concept of a dad who works outside of the home.

I mean, weird, man.

The question, and tonight’s topic, is how the rise of the ‘net, mobile technology, and consequently changing social attitudes have affected your own work and life. Are any aspects of your experience similar to my own? Do you work in a very traditional office environment? Or does your own work arrangement involve something else entirely? Do you consider the additional flexibility afforded by technology a generally positive thing, or not?

Discuss.

Comments closed
    • Firestarter
    • 7 years ago

    I ride 25 miles to work every day, only because my employers are too incompetent to use a ticketing or software versioning system. I can help my co-workers from time to time by walking over and trouble-shooting, I guess that wouldn’t be as easy when I’m at home but certainly not impossible either.

    I need to get out of here 🙁

    • johnrreagan
    • 7 years ago

    I’m in Kentucky, but all my co-workers are in California or China. I’ve never been to either facility. I’ve only met 3 of my co-workers ever. I have late night meetings to match mornings in China. I have early meetings to match evenings in China.

    I miss the ability to collaborate. Everything is done via phone, email, or instant message. I work longer hours but I think they get less work from me in the long run.

    On the bright side, I get to choose the coffee I drink, I have a great view of a golf course, and can listen to music without disturbing my co-workers. My wife also works from home in an office downstairs.

    • mattthemuppet
    • 7 years ago

    this came to mind when I read the FNT
    [url<]http://theoatmeal.com/comics/working_home[/url<] Given how much lab equipment I need to do my job, there's little chance of me working from home, although work is only a 10min bike ride so it's not that much of a hardship. I'd miss the interaction with my lab mates and boss, and if I need to avoid being pestered by students, I go site outside/ upstairs with my laptop. Sort of like working at home, but with 1000x more children wandering around 🙂

    • TheMonkeyKing
    • 7 years ago

    I thought about sending this to your neighbors: [url<]http://vimeo.com/3330465[/url<]

    • Phydoux
    • 7 years ago

    Add me to the list of TR readers that works from home. I’m a programmer but I do all of my work remotely at home. Code is uploaded/downloaded via VPN. We use Skype for IM and voice/video chat.

    Been doing this for quite a long time. I can’t imagine going back to a job at an office somewhere.

    • d0g_p00p
    • 7 years ago

    I’m a unix admin so I can pretty much do all of my work remotely with the occasional trips to the colo. That said I did work a job where I was working at home 4 days a week and only one day in the office. It was very nice but I really missed the lack of “office” structure and being around my coworkers and what not. Right now i have a cubie at my current place and like it for the reasons I listed above. I am pretty much free to either work at home or in the office as long as I put in my 8 hours. It’s nice for those days when I don’t want to head in the office and just want to chill at home but again for the most part I enjoy heading into work and seeing my coworkers and what not. I enjoy the commute as well since it gives me time to read and kind of a “wake up” before i log into my box at work.

    That being said if I had the type of business you run at TR and a family I would love to work the way you do. I’m a social person so I would miss that aspect but being able to be around your wife and kids would make up for it.

    I do find the way technology has changed the workplace to be somewhat bad. Since I am constantly tethered to my job though my phone, VPN, IM, email, etc I find the separation of work and personal life to be diminished. Sure I can turn off my phone, ignore my email and close IM but it’s almost like this is now expected for tech workers. It can be a good thing if you enjoy your job and obviously be very intrusive if you are trying to spend quality time with you family, your so or alone and your boss sends you a email or text message with the expectation that you will see it and respond.

    Finding a good balance is key but unfortunately it’s not always that easy or clear cut.

    • Madman
    • 7 years ago

    Working from home is an interesting approach. Sometimes it works very well, and sometimes you just can’t get anything done, while being in a constant stress.

    Not seeing people day-to-day is also hard.

    • BIF
    • 7 years ago

    I work from home a couple days each week. We are mostly allowed to set our own schedules. We must notify each other and our manager if we have to leave our workspaces for any length of time, regardless if we are at home or physically in an office that day.

    I find that the couple days in the home office allow me to focus on tasks that I otherwise would not be allowed to when in the office. To capitalize on that, I save certain things for my work at home days.

    The hardest thing is for people who have a spouse and kids at home. The family often finds it difficult to understand that “daddy/mommy” is at work and should not be constantly disturbed.

    Early in my career, nobody had laptops yet so whenever we were on call, we had to bring home a portable dumb terminal with a built-in dialer. It was somewhat thicker than the early Dell laptops, but this was back in the early to mid 90s.

    Today, almost nobody in the office has a desktop computer; we’re an army of mobile office warriors.

      • barleyguy
      • 7 years ago

      x2.

      I’ve worked from home about 2 days a week for the last couple of years. We pretty much set our own hours and days; we just post them on a Google calendar for the rest of the group to look at, and try not to all schedule the same days out. We can’t all be out on the same day because we have a secure datacenter that isn’t connected to the internet (“air gapped”). But other than that requirement, my manager says “I don’t care what your hours are as long as you get your job done”.

      I think it’s essential to have a home office, as in a separate room with a door that closes, which is only used for work. I think it helps to establish a productive mental state to “go to work”, even if work is only 10 feet away from your bedroom. Also, sometimes if home is distracting (because of too many available toys) I have been known to work from a coffee shop or the county library. Anywhere with good internet can function. It’s also nice to have someone to fill up your tea while you’re working. 😉

      Also, we do have some employees (mostly operations people) that are required to work at night to prevent outages on the off hours. Those people are mostly on 12 hour shifts (6 pm to 6 am) with 4/3/3/4 cadence, so they work long days but have 3 or 4 days off a week. I did that shift for a couple of months, and had mixed feelings about it.

        • paulWTAMU
        • 7 years ago

        I’d love that shift until my kid’s born. After that, not seeing him at all for 4 days might kind of suck

    • moose17145
    • 7 years ago

    Full time student… still (feels like forever now..), part time job working at the local liquor store (so when i work and the hours are all over the place), in the national gaurd, and a girlfriend with two kids. That being said… what the heck is this “free time” you all keep talking about?

    Seriously though i would love to have a job like you guys who run tech report have! Maybe you all put in more than 40 hrs a week often times… but heck it sounds like you all have ‘jobs’ you love for the most part. Obviously the holy grail is to have a job that you love so much that never once did you ever go to work, you simply went to that place where you do what you love and what your passion is. I have had a few teachers like that. Just hope one day maybe i can do the same and get a job that i love so much that its never really work. Eh we will see tho…

    Being able to work from home sounds like it would be awesome to me though.

    • willmore
    • 7 years ago

    Okay, as a stay-at-home-parent, I’m going to ask this once. Can we please have a thumbs up/down for the parent article? You need a thumbs up.

    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    Fricking weird… I was thinking the same thing when coming home today. I currently work from home as well and I can’t help but feel like I’m doing something wrong even though I maintain a self-sufficient lifestyle. Some people just look at you like a loafer too as they don’t understand how it’s possible to not physically attend a 8-5 job at all times (my parents being one of those).

    I do have to say not physically being able to separate your job from your home time is a bit disconcerting though. I’m sure most people who have worked from home have felt that way. Where you can’t unwind because the place you unwind is also the place where you work, possibly even the same workspace.

    I honestly still don’t know how to answer your questions beyond what I already have. It sorta feels like I’m still in college, which may be a good or bad thing… I could forsee the traditional workplace disappearing altogether as culture, job, and free time combined. I still don’t know if this is a good or bad thing. It could simply just be the next step as we become ever more interconnected with one another with many unforeseen consequences and benefits.

      • willmore
      • 7 years ago

      I’ll date myself here, but I went through this over a decade ago. Yes, this is something that our society and our business environment needs to wrap its head around. Harder yet, we, as workers, need to get our head wrapped around. It’s hard to not have anything that requires you to get up in the morning at any specific time. It takes discipline beyond what it takes to get up for work. Your boss kill chew your ass out if you’re in late. But, if he has no idea when you get ‘in’, what happens?

      It takes a lot of resolve and though before you come to some workable solution. Hell, I’m not sure there is *one* solution. There are probably many of them. But, this is the first time that we, as a society, have had a chance to rethink the shift based thinking which came into being a hundred or so years ago with the industrial revolution.

      The world doesn’t sleep, but I need to. So, when should I be awake?

        • Bensam123
        • 7 years ago

        Aye… The whole not having ‘looming doom’ over your head kills motivation. Punishment and negative reinforcement do wonders for little things that you should be doing on your own. Perhaps it would be different if we were never taught that’s why we need to do things… Do things because they’re necessary, rather then because ‘I don’t want to get bitched at today’.

          • BIF
          • 7 years ago

          Adults don’t need to have looming doom, especially if they love their work and have enthusiasm and drive for it.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            Unfortunately there are far too many non-adults by mentality, not age, in the workforce.

            [quote<]if they love their work and have enthusiasm and drive for it[/quote<] lol.

            • Bensam123
            • 7 years ago

            Yes sir… Not everyone gets to work their dream job either. I’m not entirely sure that has to do with maturity level either. Rather motivation to accomplish something you really don’t like doing or like being a part of. You don’t always have options available to deal with this either.

    • dstrbd
    • 7 years ago

    I often wonder if I am the only trades person (plumber) who uses this site as his/her homepage and reads almost every article (except the machole sorry Jason) and comments religously for the last 5-6 years, and sorry I dont post more often.
    Anyways, at least in my line of work, work hours have always been 7 to 3:30 when I was in the field. I started a company with a partner in 2000 and, to make a long story short, ended up in a office bidding work, purchasing materials and scheduling work for my employees. We had 1 computer which was left to our secretary to manage all our financial needs while my partner and I hand wrote all our bids, purchase orders and used the phone to contact our employees to schedule them.
    We then upgraded our antiquated methods and started working on a network due to rapid growth but still worked in our office.
    Since 2008 when the housing market went down the tubes we went from 58 employees to 5. There wasnt a need for both me and my partner to be in a our office and so one of us had to go back in the field so we decided it was best for myself to hit the field to take up less overhead. The worst part of that was that I would have to back to our office after normal work hours to enter any data that was required and I found my hours climbing up to around 14-16 hours a day. We all know this can add even more stress when you have a wife and three kids.
    Thanks to the internet, smartphones and nvidia surround, I now do all my paperwork, ordering and scheduling from the comfort of my home after working in the field or from my smartphone while in the field saving me 4-6 hours a day. I havent even been to my office in 3 years.
    Being a plumber I do wear pants…but may show a little crack lol

      • d0g_p00p
      • 7 years ago

      You get a mighty thumbs up from me. I have a buddy who is a construction contractor and is absolutely in love with tech but cannot find anyone to talk to about it in his line of work. It’s cool to see the stereo types broken and even more awesome if one day I am talking about video cards and CPU’s with my plumber.

        • paulWTAMU
        • 7 years ago

        My brother’s a tech head, but he says a surprising amount of his fellow rough necks are, to varying degrees.

        • dstrbd
        • 7 years ago

        When I have service calls and get the oppurtunity to talk tech with some customers they find it hard to believe that their plumber knows so much about computers let alone some of my scratch built pc’s I’ve built for my buddies such as this wall hung pc I made for my partner who wanted more deck space. [url<]http://img15.imageshack.us/img15/4885/dsc00461kw.jpg[/url<]

    • DiMaestro
    • 7 years ago

    The age of complete, instant on demand communications with work via cell, vpn, and other related items has caused me to be … on call 24/7.

    I am pretty much at the mercy of work, *always*. If I plan on leaving for the weekend, I have to make plans with co-workers. If i”m home sick? I’m checking my cell for emails & voice messages.

    I have become the ‘always at work’ slave.

    Sadly, I’m ok with that. Nowadays, just having a decent job is the golden goose.

    ***Edit

    While I have traditional hours, I do not have traditional on call hours. I’m really always available for work, no matter the situation. Work calls? I must answer.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      Yeah, I so don’t want to get into that position, but being employed is better than not, like you said.

        • DiMaestro
        • 7 years ago

        Funkster. Yea, that should be your new name.

        Anyway, I want to ensure that I didn’t misrepresent myself. I work for the local government. Meaning, I support 3 PDs, 1 Sheriffs Office, 1 local Swat for the gov (including most other gov functions that don’t require me to wake up at 3am)

        Meaning I knew what I was getting into when I signed up. I love it, it gives me a nice sense of fulfillment, but … it’s also a huge PITA.

        So I get rewarded for it, but at the same time, I really do miss the more carefree days of going ‘fuck it, I’m driving to the Gulf, or the Left Coast, or .. whatever…

        Technology has made my life easier – and at the same time more difficult. How about that for some weird duality?

    • NeelyCam
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]the typical 40-hour work week.[/quote<] Now you're just being silly

    • derFunkenstein
    • 7 years ago

    I’ve been working in the same office for around 5.5 years now. We started up as a satellite to a corporate office in MO to try to help that company get established in Illinois. Around 18 months into that endeavor, we got bought out by a big publicly-traded company and I’m still in my office. We started with 10 people in my office and due to a couple leaving and a couple more being let go, we’re down to 3. I’m not sure how much longer they’ll pay for office space and require me to drive to the office. Whenever that day comes that I go there no more, I hope it’s because I’m telecommuting and not fired. Or maybe I’ll find something else, who knows. At any rate, we’re casual being only 3 of us. We all come in at 7:30 and we generally all go at 4:00 and we’re fairly tight-knit.

    • Flatland_Spider
    • 7 years ago

    The increased flexibility is definitely nicer. Right now, I’m sitting at home watching a backup server, I’m just figuring out it’s backup something it’s not supposed to. >:| Anyway, I’m at home messing around my house doing what I want to do instead of being stuck at the office until it finishes.

    The only problem I run into is providing services for telecommuters who don’t have their laptop without going proprietary.

    I may not have found the correct stuff just yet, so I’d like to know how everyone else deals with remote access of files, and such, when they don’t have a company computer with them.

    • jpostel
    • 7 years ago

    I spent about 10 years working in traditional corporate IT and working in cubeville, and another 5 consulting where my schedule and workplace were random. The consulting really taught me how to work when there is nothing to do (learn new stuff, experiment, etc.). I went to work at a software company about 7 years ago and now I can’t imagine having to be in a “normal” office everyday. I work from home almost exclusively (I don’t even have a desk at our local office), and I spend about 25-30% of my time at customers.

    I have a home office (with a lock on my door to keep out the small ones). My work phone is my cell, but I have a landline as backup. I have a laptop in my bag for when I am not home, and a desktop as my primary work system. Lots of cloud-based stuff to make sure everything is in sync (Evernote and Jungledisk are my saviors). I am on the road enough that I have mobile Internet with Sprint and Verizon (can’t count how many times this has been key). I am in the “Garden State” part of NJ, and my boss lives near Boston, so I see him every 3 months or so.

    I laugh when I run into people at school-parent functions and they do a double-take because I am coming from a meeting, and wearing a suit. If they see me any other time, I am wearing pajamas, shorts, or overalls (working out in the yard).

      • willmore
      • 7 years ago

      x2 this.

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]I am in the "Garden State" part of NJ,[/quote<] New Jersey has such an undeserved bad rep; people haven't seen the good part of NJ.

        • willmore
        • 7 years ago

        The northern part of NJ is horrible and that’s the part closest to NYC and, since NYC is the center of the universe, well we get what we have. I lived for five years in the nice part of NJ and I’m tired of the whole NYC centric attitude.

    • no51
    • 7 years ago

    I work in a regular office, but a good chunk of people I work with are across the pond in Germany as well as various places around the US. WebEx galore.

      • rhema83
      • 7 years ago

      Seems like I’m the second “regular office” guys replying to this thread, after you. I am quite surprised that so many people are able to take advantage of available technology and work from home. And honestly I am jealous. The nine hours I spend a day in a poorly-ventilated office building is probably cutting my life short by a couple of years. And half the people on my floor are either obnoxious or nasty or both. Fortunately web access at work is reasonably unrestricted (no gaming or trading sites, but TR and social networking sites work) and my boss doesn’t frown on using IEMs to block out the noise.

    • indeego
    • 7 years ago

    I find the concept of modern day workers shuffling to gather in large buildings *much* more weird/strange, now that we have the technology to all but eliminate that requirement.

    There is zero requirement for my coworkers to be together physically, in fact we would all be able to afford the highest technology possible in our field and be a LOT more efficient with hardware and software and networks than we are now.

    But they like to see meatspace. So the cycle continues.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      Facetime matters.

      Also, depending on the industry there can be strict security requirements, whether external or internal. We’ve all seen those ‘missing laptop had thousands or millions of SSN/medical records/other confidential information’ stories. Maybe for smaller companies with all ‘professional’ employees remote access works great, but would you really want your health insurance or financial information being accessed by hundreds or thousands of high turnover phone CSRs from their home?

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 7 years ago

      You said:

      [quote<]we have the technology to all but eliminate that requirement. [/quote<] Should be: [quote<]we have the technology to [s<]all but[/s<] eliminate that requirement. [/quote<] When using "all but" it implies everything but. We have the technology to eliminate that requirement. What you said is the opposite of reality. I'm sure I'll get many down votes for correcting someone on semantics, but those who use words in ways they don't understand is worse!

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        ‘all but’ in this case to me means ‘practically’ or ‘almost completely.’ It’s a phrase where the words together convey the meaning.

          • Captain Ned
          • 7 years ago

          Day job in the regulatory world. We can’t even get a VPN option to log into the office network from home, and I’m a home-based employee.

          @ indeego: There remain some parts of the world where direct contact is the only way to perform one’s job. As a financial regulator I’d be an idiot to assign ratings to a financial institution without sitting down with senior management and having several exceedingly frank discussions. After all, that bit is the core of my job.

            • indeego
            • 7 years ago

            And for those instances you hire a conference area as needed. Pay top dollar when you do so. I won’t post our monthly rent but there is no expense for top-of-the-line rental areas for clients or staff that would get anywhere close to that amount.

            • paulWTAMU
            • 7 years ago

            Depends on how often you need that face time–and not everywhere has ruinous rent either.

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 7 years ago

          If you “all but” won the last race. You didn’t win the last race. To you it may mean something different, but in the English language, it means everything but. It’s a terrible saying and it’s constantly used incorrectly.

        • BIF
        • 7 years ago

        No downvote from me because you’re both wrong!

        We neither have the technology to eliminate the requirement nor to “all but” eliminate that requirement.

        Many people will still need to go into the office. My dental hygenist’s arms are only so long. Likewise, my mechanic can’t change my oil at the service station from his house.

        Only people working in certain vocations or in some cases who have the ability to run their own business can work from their house on an ongoing basis.

          • DrJ
          • 7 years ago

          [i<]We neither have the technology to eliminate the requirement nor to "all but" eliminate that requirement.[/i<] Agreed. My company practices in the experimental biophysics and traditional physical chemistry space. The instruments, reagents and support equipment are all located at the company, and there simply is no way one can use these things off site. That said, the company is located in an out-building on our property, and my wife also works out of the house. We both love it. She can tend to the garden during breaks, and cook things that require attention over the course of a day. I don't drive much any more, so my 25 year old car is fine for its 4K miles per year. Our costs are way down as a consequence. And it makes my 80 hours per week a lot easier to manage. I rue the day when the company grows enough that i have to move to a "real" site.

        • indeego
        • 7 years ago

        It means [i<]essentially eliminate[/i<] Obviously we don't have the perfect technology, or we would be able to convince every shareholder/management holding staffmember of the benefits. I stand by my statement.

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 7 years ago

      If they want to make the American worker more competitive against the outsourced worker, they’d start eliminating the huge office buildings full of workers who could work as well from home via online. Bonus: they could toss in some money to help build up the intarwebz to help facilitate this transition.

      Then we could all be at home working weird.

      Alas, people are stuck on the old. This is why America’s decadence will grow and grow until we start lashing out in wars as we decline in importance, trying desperately to convince ourselves we still matter.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 7 years ago

      I think a lot of people (myself included), would not work as well at home and being put in a different environment increases productivity.

    • Skullzer
    • 7 years ago

    My wife has worked from home for the last year and a half. It was a startup company and they had no physical office. Our friends and family just could not wrap their minds around The fact that although she spent most of her days in her PJs, that she was actually working. We sent our kids to daycare because it was impossible for her to get anything done with a 6 and 3 year old.

    Now things have changed, the company has expanded and the owners decided they needed an office…but it’s 45 minutes from home. Instead of getting on Skype at 8:00am, she now is commuting..in her car..with no access to work stuff. She has argued the point that she could be using that 1.5 hours of travel time to actually be productive but the company insists that there’s more value for them to have her in the office.

    I myself work in retail banking where I have to be at work from open to close. It sure is nice being able to leave work at work and not have to worry about that stuff when im home. But it sure would be nice to just roll out of bed, sit at my computer or in front of the tv, or on my patio, and be able to work when or how I want. But it’s also nice have structure to the day and not having to answer a call or Skype or email asking for something to be done at 10:00pm cause it can’t wait for the morning haha.

    I guess there’s really no point to this post other than to share my experience, I’m curious to read about how others feel about the situation they have.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      UNEMPLOYED!

        • anotherengineer
        • 7 years ago

        Still milking that EI are ya?

        And Scott “the lack of structure has caused me to put in more time, not less, than the typical 40-hour work week.”
        Liking your work and having a choice probably also has something to do with it.

        I know it’s none of my business but I am always curious what a hardware reviewer, working out of his home, playing with the newest goodies brings in on avg in a year. Sounds more like “you get paid for this” type careers than the typical “i hate my job” jobs.

        I’ve been thinking of a career change lately also, drop engineering and go back to the trades, maybe construction and mechanical HVAC/pipefitter. The way the housing market is here at the moment I could probably work 6 months and take the other 6 months off.

        Either way kudos to you!

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          no, not ei. my wife works, while i go to school full time.

    • paulWTAMU
    • 7 years ago

    Do you wear pants while doing most of your work? Please say yes.

    I began my professional life after the rise of the internet so my perspective isn’t as open/in depth as people that watched it happen while they were working. For me the main perk is once in a while, if I feel like ass, I can stay home (and near the toilet) while still actually working, thus not burning PTO and not falling far behind.

      • Damage
      • 7 years ago

      Yes, I wear pants, but I can’t say the same for all of my TR colleagues. 🙂

        • paulWTAMU
        • 7 years ago

        Hmm. That could make some interesting give away contest.

        Winner: Brand new motherboard from XYZ
        Runner Up–Same motherboard, but spent 2 weeks around a writer who rarely if ever wore pants while working on it. May or may not have hairs and skin included.

          • internetsandman
          • 7 years ago

          And blood if it’s been used to test a horribly cramped ITX enclosure

            • paulWTAMU
            • 7 years ago

            Blood for the machine god.

        • cynan
        • 7 years ago

        That’s it! I DEMAND a declaration of pants-wearing at the beginning of each and every podcast from now on!

        It’s one thing to have to face the possibility that the shrewd and eloquently crafted tech journalism prose that I’m reading on this site may have been authored with complete disdain for proper attire etiquette, but to have to listen to the bunch of you jibber-jabber ad nauseum all the while never knowing just what exactly is between your bottom halves and the microphone relaying it all to my sensitive virgin ears… Oh! THE HUMANITY!!

          • willmore
          • 7 years ago

          I do not want to know. Mark me down for “la la la la la la la”.

        • Meadows
        • 7 years ago

        Next Friday, you’re going to have to post pictures of Cyril without pants.

          • paulWTAMU
          • 7 years ago

          Why do you hate us?

            • Meadows
            • 7 years ago

            I don’t.

            • paulWTAMU
            • 7 years ago

            Making us see a pantsless Cyril doesn’t count as hate?

      • barleyguy
      • 7 years ago

      At my work, we generally have an unspoken “don’t ask, don’t tell”* policy when it comes to whether one is wearing pants while working from home. We have Saturday software deploys where almost everyone is at home, and people have delved into the realm of TMI. “Dude, I really didn’t want to know that.”

      *(Pardon the political connotations.)

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