Wednesday Shortbread

7 Up

  1. Ars Technica: “Six strikes” Internet warning system will come to U.S. this year and

    Microsoft brings browser ballot to Windows 8 as EU antitrust probe continues

  2. ZDNet: Microsoft to deliver Flash update to Windows 8 users ‘shortly’
  3. HotHardware and PC Perspective cover IDF day 1: Intel’s Haswell
  4. Fudzilla: Intel shows less-than-expected at IDF keynote

    and Haswell at 7W does job of Ivy at 17W and

    no precise date for Haswell and Intel building

    high-performance server chips and Intel shows

    Siri-like feature for notebooks

  5. The Korea Times has an exclusive: Samsung to sue Apple over iPhone 5
  6. X-bit labs: AMD’s SeaMicro uncovers ultra-

    dense MicroServers for big data industries

  7. VideoCardz: GeForce GTX 650 and GTX 660 performance charts


Wednesday

  1. Ars Technica: Google VP says Apple v. Samsung verdict was a “wake-up call

    and GoDaddy outage was caused by router snafu, not DDoS attack

    and Minnesota file-sharer loses appeal, must pay $222,000

  2. Reuters: Apple turns legal guns on Polish retailer A.pl
  3. X-bit labs: Former Hitachi GST chief to become chief executive of

    Western Digital and Nanya mulls exiting commodity DRAM business

    and Cadence reveals world’s first 28nm DDR4 memory controller

  4. Tech on Budget: Lenovo C220 Atom-powered AIO quietly released
  5. Fudzilla: Google Drive gets major update
  6. Ars Technica: Nvidia announces Kepler-based Quadro K5000 GPU for Mac Pro
  7. Newegg’s 48-hour deals
  8. Dealzon’s deals: $300 off 15.5″ Sony Vaio i5-2410M / 1080p, $200 off

    14″ Vizio ultrabook i3-3217U / 128GB SSD, $200 off 13.3″ hp Folio

    i3-2367M / 128GB SSD, and $84 coupon for 22″ Lenovo ThinkVision

    LCD monitor

Mobile

  1. Nvidia: We have high hopes for new Tegra chips – Tbreak
  2. Hardware.Info’s LG Optimus L7 and Samsung Galaxy Ace Plus reviews
  3. Traveling with an iPad: TechSpot’s impressions & accessory survival guide
  4. Ars Technica’s hands-on: iPics2Go quickly, easily get analog photos into your iPhone

Software and gaming

  1. Oracle: Change to Java SE 7 and Java SE 6 update release numbers
  2. Ars Technica: Windows Store now open to all for submissions
  3. Gizmodo: Keeping Windows 8 tiles at bay with RetroUI (thanks Neutronbeam)
  4. Ars Technica’s first look: Windows Server 2012 brings the cloud down to earth
  5. HowtoForge on the perfect server: OpenSUSE 12.2 x86_64
  6. World of Gnome: 13-year old hacker Esteban is announced developer of the month
  7. Gamasutra: No surprises with Steam Greenlight’s first approvals
  8. Massively: ArenaNet resumes digital sales of Guild Wars 2
  9. Ars Technica: How to run your own Minecraft server
  10. Hardware Heaven’s Tekken Tag Tournament 2 review (Xbox 360)

Systems and storage

  1. TechReviewSource on Sony Vaio S13 (SVS13112FXW)
  2. [H]ard|OCP reviews MSI Z77A-G41
  3. Futurelooks reviews Asus ROG Maximus V Gene
  4. techPowerUp! reviews 16GB Corsair Dominator

    Platinum 2666MHz CL10 memory kit

  5. ocaholic reviews 8GB AData XPG Gaming Series

    V2.0 DDR3 2400MHz CL10 memory kit

  6. HTL reviews Corsair Dominator Platinum DDR3 1600MHz memory kit
  7. Hardware Secrets reviews 256GB Samsung 830 series SSD
  8. Benchmark Reviews on 256GB AData XPG SX900 SSD
  9. XSReviews on 240GB Corsair Neutron GTX SSD
  10. TweakTown’s 120GB Zalman F1 SSD review

Multimedia

  1. iXBT Labs review AFOX Radeon HD 7850 (single-slot) & MSI R7870 Hawk
  2. HT4U reviews Sapphire Radeon HD 7850 Dual-X 1GB (in German)
  3. Tbreak reviews XFX R7750 Black Edition
  4. KitGuru’s Gigabyte GTX 660 Ti OC WindForce review
  5. Techgage reviews SteelSeries Sensei [RAW] mouse

Power, cases, and cooling

  1. ThinkComputers posts AviiQ portable charging station review
  2. Madshrimps review Corsair Vengeance C70 case
  3. Legit Reviews on Fractal Design Define R4 case
  4. Guru3D’s Cooler Master CM Storm Stryker case review
  5. TweakTown reviews BitFenix Recon touchscreen fan controller
  6. Neoseeker reviews Noctua NF-F12 PWM 120mm cooling fan
  7. ProClockers review Cooler Master NotePal Ergo 360 laptop cooler
  8. OCC’s Xigmatek Dark Knight SD1283 and Loki SD963 reviews
  9. ocaholic reviews be quiet! Dark Rock 2 CPU cooler
Comments closed
    • WillBach
    • 8 years ago

    I feel that I should expand on the topic of AMD not being dead, despite Haswell being made from [url=https://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=82867&p=1131303<]ground unicorn horns or bacon[/url<]. AMD (like Via) serves the x86 markets where Intel doesn't play. Right now, that is: [list<] [*<]Embedded where performance needs > Atom; cost needs < Core (AMD and Via) [/*<][*<]Laptops where performance needs > Atom; cost needs < Core (AMD only) [/*<][*<]Servers where RAM per dollar (or some other corner case) needs > Xeon (AMD only again) [/*<][*<]SoC with additional IP requirements (AMD only but maybe Via later)[/*<] [/list<] That last one is going to be more and more important moving forward. Intel annouced years ago that it would accept external IP into Atom, I don't know if they've had any takers. In the same vein, Bulldozer and Bobcat were both designed to be able to talk quickly to new IP blocks, and be taped out quickly with those new IP blocks added. [list<] [*<]Sony or IBM could add a Cell Broadband Engine to Bulldozer and target the HPC market. [/*<][*<]They could do that for Bobcat and target all sorts of embedded areas. [/*<][*<]Google, Lenovo, Canonical, and maybe Nokia or Samsung (but not Dell, Acer, or Vizio and probably not HP) could add security IP to Bulldozer and make more secure laptops or desktops. [/*<][*<]Or Bobcat and make more secure tablets. [/*<][*<]Cray or Fujitsu could add their own interconnect IP to bulldozer and in Fujitsu's case, their own vector coprocessors, and target HPC. [/*<][*<]Panasonic or Sharp could add their own DSP to Hondo (little Bobcat) and make camcorders or cameras that did 3D processing, panorama shots (like the iPhone 5) and have wireless connectivity (I think a camera with wireless just came out).[/*<] [/list<] That's just the surface. In the last decade, Linux and Windows compatibility [i<]was[/i<] the product. AMD did it better for a few years, Intel since then. Now that's just the price of admission, and a useful product will be one that builds on it. Some companies (the ones with the most programmers, often their own OS) have figured out that the money is in doing things no one else can. Adding features and not just checking off things in Windows or projects from Apache that meet some minimum standard of "working". The chip makers who are the best at serving those companies, and working with the IP those companies bring, will thrive. And it's clear from interviews (and presentations) that AMD's executives understand that. Keep in mind that this is the same company that jumped [b<]entirely[/b<] into the Flash memory and stopped making CPUs (and raked in money from their fabs) after Intel axed chipset compatibility.

      • chuckula
      • 8 years ago

      You have some good points, but a few silly ones as well.

      First off, I’m going to chalk up the statement about the Cell processor to a momentary lapse in reasoning while you were typing up that post. If I had a nickel for every time I heard about how Cell was going to take over the world, I’d be retired now. Believe me, there are good reasons that Cell was abandoned and that Sony went back to a generic x86 CPU for the PS 4. Go to the IDF website and download the architectural talk on how Haswell has effectively doubled the cache bandwidth to make the expanded AVX engines actually useful: Here’s a hint, anybody can design some silicon with a ridiculously high theoretical throughput. Very few people can design silicon that actually keeps those crazy computing units operating efficiently.

      Second of all, while AMD could be purchased and broken up for IP, don’t think for one second that [b<]any[/b<] company, even Intel, could simply do a slapped together copy & paste job that mixes & matches AMD's components with random third-party products to produce the product of the day. That ain't how it works! As Exhibit A showing how hard it is, look at the five year journey that AMD went on in trying to get an existing x86 + existing GPU technology in Llano out the door, and even once it was out there were massive issues with manufacturing. You assume that any and every third party vendor out there can do what AMD couldn't easily and quickly... it ain't gonna happen. Third: Bobcat in a tablet? I'll remember that the next time somebody says that a 7.5 Watt Haswell is too power hungry for a tablet... Maybe you meant the stripped-down version of "Hondo". We'll see how it does. P.S. --> What does using Bobcat for have to do with a "more secure tablet"????? Of the companies you name only IBM of Fujitsu are even *REMOTELY* realistic contenders for making real use of AMD's IP, and frankly I'm not sure what either company would find very appealing about owning a bunch of IP instead of just using an existing manufacturer to build the chips for the products they actually care about. I'd be careful in talking about Cray considering 100% of their high-speed interconnect business is owned by... Intel. Panasonic and Sharp are equipment manufacturers, not chip companies. They buy chips and occasionally work with outside vendors to have somebody else design the chips, but they are not huge IC design companies. Here's the main good point you have: AMD can be cheaper than Intel if it plays its cards right. Cheap is easy: I can have a high school dropout with a price gun mark stuff as cheap. What AMD has not been doing lately, however, is actually living up to the "playing its cards right" part of the equation. Case in point #1 is Bulldozer: That chip is a huge nightmare that is regularly beaten by Ivy Bridge chips that are literally half the size of the BD die.. and that's including a GPU and on-board PCIe controllers that improve performance and save power to boot. AMD's main mission with Steamroller is not to beat Haswell at performance because frankly AMD cannot do that with any "modification" of the basic Bulldozer design. Instead, AMD's mission with Steamroller is to shrink the hell out of Bulldozer until the die sizes are reasonable while hopefully maintaining enough clock headroom to have reasonable performance. Then AMD can sell the Steamroller dies cheap and actually stand a chance at making a profit. Trinity is in better shape, although the fact that desktop chips aren't hitting the market until October can't be a great omen. I've heard we won't be seeing Kaveri for some time either, and AMD is taking a bigger risk with Kaveri. I have no doubt that a desktop Kaveri at 100 watts will have a faster GPU than a desktop Haswell. I also have no doubt that the desktop Haswell will be substantially faster on the CPU side and that a $75 GPU will give it the performance wins in games... the desktop is not the place to be winning on the GPU front outside of the HTPC niche. It is the mobile devices where the IGP really needs to shine. If GloFo hadn't screwed up 28 nm then a more advanced version of the Brazos chips might be out already, but Hondo could be nice when it shows up. AMD talks a big talk about tablets, but they have to go down the exact same learning curve that Intel has gone down to be truly competitive with ARM. People who diss on Atom because the E-450 is faster tend to forget that the E-450 managed to be marginally faster while using twice the power... that is where AMD needs to put major investment if it wants a real share of the tablet and smartphone market. If I were running things at AMD, my priority #1 would be to get diversification between foundries. It ain't easy, but AMD can't afford to be a hostage to the whims of GloFo or TSMC. Second, I'd be busting my butt to stop the brain drain that has occurred on the graphics side of the house where the old AMD management pissed off a lot of the best ATI employees and got them to leave. Third: Attack Intel in niches where I can make a difference, which is mainly pushing Trinity and Kaveri and doing major work to radically improve the mobile versions of Kaveri.

        • WillBach
        • 8 years ago

        Thanks for responding to my wall of text in a thoughtful and reasoned way! I think we’re 80% thinking on the same page here, but maybe you’ve got the crux of my comment about IP reversed. I’m talking about AMD making chips on contract that contain whatever IP blocks (small, specialized circuits like the video encode/decode unit in Sandy Bridge and newer processors from Intel or the Silicon Hive DSP in Medfield) their customers ask for. In both Bobcat and Bulldozer, large parts of the design aresynthesized. One of the results (and intentions) of that is to make adding extra, modular parts (like GPUs) easier. AMD has created a [url=http://semiaccurate.com/2011/06/22/amd-and-arm-join-forces-at-last<]forum[/url<] and method for silicon from different vendors to coexist more easily on die. That's the first step to, as you said, "attack Intel in niches where I can make a difference". That general purpose unit that you mentioned Sony using is made by AMD (supposedly). But we don't know if it has any Sony IP in it. It might, it might not. But Sony learned (just as HP and Sun did) that sustaining your own CPU microarchitecture with Linux support and compiler support is really, really hard, even harder when your customers expect a better product every year. If AMD supplies that competitive x86 core that can feed the specialized IP, then Intel will supply the Linux and GCC ๐Ÿ˜‰ I strongly doubt Cell could take over the world. But specialized processors are doing well now, look at NVIDIA's Tesla. And, like you said, AMD needs to be cheap. They know they're not going to beat Haswell in a fair fight and knowing is the first step to fighting dirty. The marginal cost of adding a Cell processor to the Bulldozer die is lower for Sony/Toshiba/IBM/AMD than making a new processor, much lower. And it already has a (relatively) high-performance inner core (two per module!) that are specialized to offload vector instructions, with big, fat pipes to memory (and some unenviable cache issues that may be fixable). And good Linux compatibility (already validated!) to boot. If such a system is viable for, say, 10% or even 5% of the HPC market, well, that's more than AMD has now, and it beats the Cell's previous high water mark. I wasn't joking about Bobcat tablet, although Jaguar is more likely. Bobcat fits in 3W, and Microsoft put a 17W part in the Surface Pro. Hando is what would be used without a fan, but it's the same core, you got my idea. I'm not certain this strategy could save AMD, and AMD's execution would be suspect. I'm just saying they have a plan, and they're still alive.

        • WillBach
        • 8 years ago

        Oh! I forgot to mention that Intel bough the Cray interconnect IP, but Cray [url=http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/09/10/intel_server_interconnects/<]can still sell products based on the interconnect technology[/url<] that Intel bought. Intel did hire their engineers), which strengthens the case that it would be someone else actually implementing this interconnect in silicon. I have no idea if that's [i<]allowed[/i<] by the agreement, though. The other thing I forgot is that AMD already owns [url=http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/09/12/amd_seamicro_sm15000_analysis<]"Freedom Fabric"[/url<], and they'd be crazy not to pull that on die. Once they have dies that support Freedom Fabric and HyperTransport, why not also Fujitsu's [url=http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/14/proprietary_interconnects<]Tofu[/url<]. I can imagine the call from the Fujitsu CEO, "Paper-domo," (instead of Papermaster, get it?) "Oracle is no longer looking favorably on our SPARK64 license."

          • chuckula
          • 8 years ago

          I think the “freedom fabric” stuff would be a great idea to bring on-die in a server chip. AMD can still use other interconnects like PCIe and Hypertransport to hook up using Infiniband or other high-speed serial links that can go to other AMD nodes or even heterogeneous compute nodes too.

    • chuckula
    • 8 years ago

    Interesting… Apple finally got the A15 out to market in a device that people can buy in the near term. Looks like we are at the crest of the changeover to A15 cores that will really pick up next year.

      • NeelyCam
      • 8 years ago

      I may have to give up on my “No MicroSD – no sale” mantra

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 8 years ago

        Don’t do it Neely, the garden might look beautiful, but the walls are high.

          • NeelyCam
          • 8 years ago

          Walls might be high, but the gate is open!

          ..it looks like on of those one-way security gates, though..

          hmm..

    • NeelyCam
    • 8 years ago

    Apple’s new cable is called “Lightning”

    Sucks for AMD. Zero chance they can use their silly “Lightning Bolt” anywhere now – Apple owns the word “Lightning.”

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 8 years ago

      I feel for the Weather Channel.

        • jpostel
        • 8 years ago

        cease and desist

      • thor84no
      • 8 years ago

      So the box for the new devices will say “Powered by Lightning”? Or perhaps just “Lightning compatible”?

    • BIF
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]V.The Korea Times has an exclusive: Samsung to sue Apple over iPhone 5 [/quote<] Haven't read the article yet, but I think it's a brilliant move to bring out the lawsuits before the product is even announced. And it's funny!

    • hoboGeek
    • 8 years ago

    So Apple is going after the polish grocery store A.pl ?

    It should be the other way around, the polish internet grocery store started selling apples long time before Apple Stores.

    Bazinga!

    • sweatshopking
    • 8 years ago

    [url<]http://www.extremetech.com/computing/135976-before-you-buy-the-iphone-5-read-this-undercover-report-on-how-its-made[/url<]

      • Deanjo
      • 8 years ago

      Nice picture of a Nvidia card assembly line.

        • NeelyCam
        • 8 years ago

        That picture is an example of how the conditions could be improved if Apple wanted that to happen.

        But the story itself is about Apple’s approach to abuse people for profit:

        [quote<]our hero has found himself on the production line for the iPhone 5 backplate. His job is to pick up a raw, unfinished backplate and mark four drilling points with a pen, in under three seconds. He must do this for 10 hours, without breaks.[/quote<] [quote<]"You might feel uncomfortable of how we treat you, but this is all for your own good.โ€[/quote<] And finally: [quote<]This is just a fact of consumerist, capitalist life.[/quote<] Thank you Apple. Thank you Steve Jobs. Rot in hell.

    • Deanjo
    • 8 years ago

    Apple store already down.

      • willmore
      • 8 years ago

      I heard that Anonymous took credit for that.

    • chuckula
    • 8 years ago

    Regarding Haswell, you might think that the worst news for an AMD fanboy is for Intel to come out with a superior product compared to what AMD offers. That is [b<]not[/b<] actually true though. Instead, the worst thing that can happen is when Intel literally ignores AMD because AMD isn't even a relevant threat anymore. About the only concession to AMD is greatly beefing up the GPU, but you'll note that Perlmutter bent over backwards to demo Haswell running at ~8 watts even if it meant the GPU wouldn't outperform (much higher wattage) Trinity parts at that level. That has happened here because Haswell isn't competing against AMD, it is competing against ARM. I made this mistake too, but now it is pretty obvious that AMD was not in Intel's cross hairs when it came up with Haswell. Haswell is designed from the ground up to make sure that ARM doesn't go beyond tablets, and it looks like it has accomplished that goal from the demos we saw yesterday. Considering that even boring run of the mill Xeon servers have anywhere from 3 to 6 times the performance per watt of high-end ARM products, Haswell has cemented Intel's claim on any high-single digit or double-digit wattage workload. Now Intel has an opportunity to improve Atom and get a wide range of SOCs out on the market to take the fight into the low-single watt and below 1 watt ARM territory, where ARM still has some strong advantages.

      • NeelyCam
      • 8 years ago

      ARM is dead.
      AMD was already buried 6ft deep 6mo ago

        • WillBach
        • 8 years ago

        ARM is so not dead, and killing ARM is likely impossible. It’s an implementation of an idea that can be derived from first principles through mathematical reasoning. It would be like killing Euler’s method, or socialism (or individualism or bank deregulation), or Java. Any time it’s so dead and erased that you think it’s gone forever, when it’s on no one’s mind, someone thinks of it, and reimplements it.

        AMD is not quite as hard to kill, but it certainly isn’t buried yet. As I said on Sunday, no matter how much money or technology Intel has, they’ll never be able to please every customer and they know it. Intel knows it. Their customers know it. Intel knows that its customers know, but they’ll never admit how much they benefit from an x86 ecosystem as opposed to a market that’s just them.

        AMD has to worry about is macroeconomics even more than being hit in the crossfire of the Intel/ARM competition. They need the overall market for CPUs and GPUs (APUs?) to stay large enough for their 10-20% of the pie to pay for their costs.

    • Unknown-Error
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]HotHardware and PC Perspective cover IDF day 1: Intel's Haswell[/quote<] Intel, the unstoppable Juggernaut! Like it or not, its a really bad time to be an AMD fanboi ! :p

      • Deanjo
      • 8 years ago

      Na, AMD still has the better looking logo. ๐Ÿ˜›

        • NeelyCam
        • 8 years ago

        No – AMD’s logo is still stuck in the 20th century. All the winners have already moved on to logos with round shapes (Apple, Intel, Samsung…).

    • Arclight
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]VII.VideoCardz: GeForce GTX 650 and GTX 660 performance charts[/quote<] It's hard to believe those charts anymore....still waiting or real review. [quote<]Microsoft brings browser ballot to Windows 8 as EU antitrust probe continues[/quote<] Doesn't make sense to me. It's their OS, they should decide what the default browser is.......

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 8 years ago

      I find it hard to believe the EU is still stuck on browsers when Microsoft has one upped everyone with an App store that is the only available method to buy Metro/WinRT apps.

        • BIF
        • 8 years ago

        Yes, indeed!

    • MadManOriginal
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]$200 off 14" Vizio ultrabook i3-3217U / 128GB SSD[/quote<] $600 ultrabook ๐Ÿ˜ฎ Anyone seen a good, comprehensive review of one of these Vizio notebooks? [quote<]III.Gizmodo: Keeping Windows 8 tiles at bay with RetroUI (thanks Neutronbeam)[/quote<] yay, if only because fewer people might complain about Metro. [quote<]II.Reuters: Apple turns legal guns on Polish retailer A.pl[/quote<] II.Reuters: Apple turns [s<]legal guns[/s<] [b<]super full douche[/b<] on Polish retailer A.pl ^ftfy

      • nico1982
      • 8 years ago

      [quote<]$600 ultrabook ๐Ÿ˜ฎ Anyone seen a good, comprehensive review of one of these Vizio notebooks?[/quote<] Yes [url<]http://www.engadget.com/2012/08/10/vizio-thin-light-review-14-inch-2012/[/url<] To sum it up: good first attempt. Hopefully, the second generation will improve where the first falled short: trackpad, keyboard and battery life.

        • superjawes
        • 8 years ago

        Thank you for that! I had been curious as well. Would have liked to see the other machines, too, but it still tells a lot.

    • NeelyCam
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]Fudzilla: Intel shows less-than-expected at IDF keynote and Haswell at 7W does job of Ivy at 17W and[/quote<] AMD couldn't compete with Ivy Bridge at 17W.. how are they going to compete with Haswell at 7-10W? AMD -> toast. Frizt

      • Arag0n
      • 8 years ago

      Lowering frequencies, newer fab process and lower Vcc just as intel does…

      Performance per watt gap between intel and amd should remain more or less.

        • NeelyCam
        • 8 years ago

        Ivy Bridge didn’t harness the full trigate benefit. Haswell does. AMD doesn’t have its hands on anything equivalent until maybe 2014.

        Lowering VCC degrades the performance of transistors – more so on non-trigate process. Remember that Intel slide about the trigate performance at 0.7V..?

        The performance per watt gap between Intel and AMD just got bigger, and it will get bigger yet once Broadwell is out.

          • Arag0n
          • 8 years ago

          Maybe, but the point is that there is several tricks to lower TDP. I donยดt think that at this point itยดs a problem for AMD if they go from 60% of intel performance to 40%. They just need to play with the selling price as they always do.

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            TDP != active power.

            And please tell me what are these “several tricks” you’re thinking that could reduce AMD’s power consumption without sacrificing performance? The resonant clock mesh was one but it had a pretty minimal impact.

            Or are you saying performance doesn’t matter – minimum power consumption is what it’s all about? Great – Atoms for everyone!

            • OneArmedScissor
            • 8 years ago

            [quote<]Jaguars and A15s for everyone![/quote<] Fixed that for you.

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            Ah, that’s right. Those are [b<]true[/b<] examples of "performance doesn't matter". Thanks for the correction.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 8 years ago

      ‘No precise date for Haswell’

      ๐Ÿ™

        • NeelyCam
        • 8 years ago

        Last I heard it was H1/2013.
        Means end of June

      • Unknown-Error
      • 8 years ago

      Hey people! Need some advice. Hoping to buy laptop. I was thinking of either i7-3820QM or i7-3720QM. But the thing is, I am hearing a lot of good things about [b<]Haswell[/b<] especially having AVX2, power consumption, etc, etc. When will Haswell come out? (I've heard March-June)

        • Beelzebubba9
        • 8 years ago

        Haswell will probably drop in late H1, but it’s all speculation at this point. Keep in mind that most of Haswell’s improvements focus on the iGPU and super low power consumption, so if you’re shopping for a Quad Core 15+” machine with a dGPU you wont see quite the jump over IVB as you would in an ultrabook or x86 tablet, which are far more power constrained.

        I won’t be upgrading anything until Haswell comes out, but that’s because its feature set suits my mobile usage model very well.

          • Unknown-Error
          • 8 years ago

          Thanx!

        • NeelyCam
        • 8 years ago

        Beezlebubba’s advice is good. IvyBridge non-ultrabooks are probably going to be performance kings for the foreseeable future, while my guess is that Haswells first come out focusing on low power to kick the Ultrabook push into overdrive.

          • Unknown-Error
          • 8 years ago

          Thanx!

      • Antimatter
      • 8 years ago

      I can’t wait for Intel to become a monopoly and control the x86 market.

        • NeelyCam
        • 8 years ago

        Don’t worry – AMD will keep limping along

      • anotherengineer
      • 8 years ago

      Ahhhh Neely

      TROLLOLOLOLO

      I wonder if AMD bit the biscuit with the govmint would break up Intel like std. oil, of give out the x86 license to say 5 other companies?

        • Beelzebubba9
        • 8 years ago

        If AMD can’t compete with Intel on merit, how could anyone else?

        Plus considering the massive improvements Intel trots out nearly every year without substantially raising prices (or raising them at all), I can’t see a functional problem with their market dominance myself.

        • Voldenuit
        • 8 years ago

        Maybe x86 instruction set should be considered FRAND and intel (and AMD) should be forced to license to any chipmaker.

          • UberGerbil
          • 8 years ago

          The instruction set isn’t the issue. In fact, given Lotus v. Borland and others, there may be no legal impediment to anyone implementing a processor that uses it (eg Transmeta); languages aren’t copyrightable, and there’s no licensing required. The real barrier to entry are a host of patents that enable someone to make a processor using x86 (and these days, x86-64) perform in a competitive matter That pile of patents is what AMD and Intel have cross-licensed, and that is what constitutes “the x86 license” that people blithely handwave.

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