Office 2013 upgrade offer could start on October 19

These are momentous times for Microsoft. Over the next several months, we’re going to see the company refresh not just Windows, but also its Office productivity suite. Microsoft has already set up some upgrade incentives for Windows—folks who buy Windows 7 PCs today should have to pony up only $15 for an upgrade to Windows 8, for example. But what about Office? Will late Office 2010 adopters be entitled to discounts on Office 2013?

Yes, says ZDNet’s Mary Jo Foley. Quoting "one of [her] contacts," she says Microsoft will kick off an Office 2013 upgrade program on October 19. Folks who buy Office 2010 between that date and April 30, 2013 will get to join. Foley adds that her sources expect Office 2013 to hit release-to-manufacturing status in November and to hit stores next February. That means the purported deadline should leave plenty of time for stragglers.

It’s not yet clear exactly what kinds of discounts and incentives Microsoft will offer, though. The last Office upgrade program (which applied to Office 2007 users stepping up to Office 2010) allowed folks to grab the new Office release free of charge. Foley received a screenshot of an alleged Office offer page that outlines free upgrades for Office 2010 users, too, but it’s not clear how accurate the information is.

In any case, if you’re thinking of grabbing Office in the near future, waiting until October 19 is probably a good idea.

Comments closed
    • destroy.all.monsters
    • 7 years ago

    So much white space.

    /Shatner voice

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    I’m trying out LibreOffice nowadays. In the past I’ve had many negative experiences with it but the latest release seems to be pretty solid, at least where Writer and Calc are concerned. If it’s as robust as I think it is then I think it’s a worthy alternative to MS Office. People used to MSO will have a certain learning curve to go through because it doesn’t work exactly like MSO but using LO isn’t rocket science either. And hey, it’s free.

    • jstern
    • 7 years ago

    I hate the Metro style. Hate it, so I’m sticking with 2010.

    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    Still cruising with 2003… Why would I buy 2012, does it right for you now or something?

      • yuhong
      • 7 years ago

      Well keep in mind that Office 2003 ends support in April 2014 just like XP.

        • Joe Miller
        • 7 years ago

        So what? It would still work. The bugs and security exploits of this version should be fixed by now, unlike the new version.

    • albundy
    • 7 years ago

    upgrade? like win8 is suppose to be? hah, i see what you did there.

    • NeelyCam
    • 7 years ago

    So, what will they change [i<]this[/i<] time to make it miserable for those who finally got used to Office 2010? Frixt

      • 5150
      • 7 years ago

      The difference between 2007 and 2010 was nil. From messing around with 2013, I only see good things so far.

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        Maybe, but I went from 2005 to 2010, and I cried.

          • fantastic
          • 7 years ago

          We just moved from Office 2003 to 2010 at work. Office 2010 has an absurdly different user interface for doing the same old things.

            • ludi
            • 7 years ago

            Uhm, yes, welcome to The Ribbon. It’s been there since Office 2007. You may want to catch up on five years’ worth of forum threads complaining about it.

            • indeego
            • 7 years ago

            2010 ribbon was palatable, for some reason.

            Nobody liked the 2007 version, nor the performance of Outlook 2007, so we never went to it. We pretty much skipped Vista+Office 2007 almost entirely.

      • brucethemoose
      • 7 years ago

      The preview actually seems really nice. Think 2010, but smoother and with more eye candy and a better installer.

      The “cloud” aside, Functionality seems pretty much the same.

      • dpaus
      • 7 years ago

      Well, it’s all ‘touch-optimized’ now, so all text entry in Word must be done using the on-screen keyboard, not a real one, because tablets don’t have one. And to keep you from cheating, the mouse is disabled in Word. The font is limited to 36pt Arial Black to enhance readability on a tablet.

      The mouse still works in Excel, though, which is good, because your spreadsheets are now limited to 10-row by 10-column ’tiles’ that you can navigate through by mouse. Need more than 10 columns? Say, for an annual budget? No problem, your spreadsheet can ‘span’ tiles horizontally. Or vertically. Not both, however.

      Each tile can now become a slide in PowerPoint; in fact, that’s the only way to create slides now. But slide shows are much easier, because you advance the slides by swiping the current tile off the screen to reveal the one beneath it. Of course that doesn’t work if you’re using a projector, so to advance slides there, you tap on “Commands” and then “Show” and then “Slide” and then “Motion” and then “Advance” and then “OK”. Even better, the same simple command is also used to step through each bullet point on your [s<]slides[/s<] tiles. Visio is greatly enhanced now, too: all drawing is simply done with your fingertip, which you first dip into an on-screen 'virtual fingerpaint-pot' tool. The alignment grid is gone, but by default, your colors are 'snapped' to a palette of dull, monochrome shades. The best part of all? These awesome interface enhancements are fully patented by Microsoft, so you don't need to worry about Apple ripping them off.

        • indeego
        • 7 years ago

        Well done!

        • Rand
        • 7 years ago

        Please don’t give Microsoft ideas, they may very well mistaken this as a genuine need.

        • destroy.all.monsters
        • 7 years ago

        I wouldn’t put it past them. Nice work.

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