Monday Shortbread

The Pick 6

  1. It’s official: The era of the personal computer is over – AllThingsD
  2. DigiTimes: Intel says 14nm process ready for production by end of 2013
  3. The Seattle Times: Ballmer trumpets Microsoft’s ‘epic year
  4. The Inquirer: AMD’s Hondo will only support Windows 8 at launch
  5. Red Hat: Linux on ARM is no joke – ServerWatch
  6. Pitchford: Borderlands 2 DLC may skate on the sand a la Star Wars


Monday

  1. 256GB Crucial M4 SSD giveaway at The SSD Review
  2. Dealzon’s deals: $100 coupon for 15.6″ hp m6 i5-3210M, $100 coupon

    13″ hp Envy Spectre XT i5-3317U, and $100 coupon for 23″ hp Envy

    23 i5-3450S PC

Mobile

  1. Neowin: Nokia joins Samsung in slamming iPhone 5
  2. Joystiq: Minecraft Pocket Edition available on Kindle Fire via Amazon Appstore
  3. HotHardware pits iPhone 5 vs iPhone 4: Did Apple deliver a worthy upgrade?
  4. Tbreak: Another year, another iPhone and Sony Xperia acro S review

Software and gaming

  1. iTWire: openSUSE to support secure boot in next release
  2. KitGuru’s Papo & Yo review (PSN)

Hardware

  1. Tech ARP’s BIOS option of the week – PEG port VC1/map
  2. The SSD Review on 120GB Strontium Hawk SSD
  3. Legit Reviews on 8GB Bruce Lee MIMOBOT USB 2.0 flash drive
  4. OCC’s PowerColor Devil 13 HD 7990 review
  5. Technic3D reviews Creative Sound Blaster Recon3D Omega headset (in German)
  6. Tbreak’s quick look at Targus AMW50EU wireless mouse
  7. KitGuru reviews Fractal Design Define R4 case
  8. Techreaction reviews Thermaltake MAX-1542 HDD canister
  9. ProClockers on EPA’s cooling fan collection
  10. HardwareOC reviews Arctic Accelero Hybrid 7970 VGA cooler (in German)
Comments closed
    • HisDivineOrder
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]It's official: The era of the personal computer is over - AllThingsD[/quote<] I wish I got a nickel every time someone said this.

    • khands
    • 7 years ago

    Since I can’t seem to find the place to submit something awesome that should get its own article and this fits under NASA, it’s going here. They’re working on a real life Warp Drive [url<]http://www.space.com/17628-warp-drive-possible-interstellar-spaceflight.html[/url<] and it looks like powering the thing (while still requiring an energy source we haven't discovered the fuel for) may be a lot more feasible than previously thought.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      Great link!

      You can always email interesting articles to the TR staff.

    • oldog
    • 7 years ago

    A real strontium SSD would be awesome if it was delivered in mineral oil and spontaneously combusted if tampered with.

    Cue the Mission Impossible music (dum dum dum dum dum dum)!

    • GeorgeMichael
    • 7 years ago

    Iphone 5 was a huge disappointment for me, just didn’t like the phone, it’s probably the first Iphone that I dislike. There was nothing new, not even better siri; even the Nokia 920 has higher PPI and the screen apparently could be swiped perfectly while wearing gloves.
    I just can’t find anything that actually appeals to me in the new Iphone 5.
    Didn’t like any of the phones realesed this year.
    Let’s hope RIM would deliver a nice OS and good Phones with their BB10.

      • Duck
      • 7 years ago

      It’s a conservative and incremental upgrade deliving double the performance and a 16:9 aspect ratio display.

      And yes, I realize you are trolling.

        • designerfx
        • 7 years ago

        Why does his post have to be trolling? The incremental improvements were underwhelming. No actual battery improvement and no screen resolution jump. Granted I’m not an apple fan myself, but apple did a ton of new things in 4s, and now here we are with iphone 5, and….uh?

        • GeorgeMichael
        • 7 years ago

        suck my coke

      • Sam125
      • 7 years ago

      I don’t dislike the iPhone 5 but it isn’t much more advanced than the competition nowadays so it was kind of a disappointing product launch for me. I’m also looking forward to BB10 and hopefully it isn’t disappointing.

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    Again in response to “Nokia joins Samsung in slamming Iphone 5”

    I just bought a Sony Xperia Sola. This model’s slogan is “Get entertained with a sense of magic.” Isn’t this also taking a subtle shot at Apple?

    • lilbuddhaman
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<] Pitchford: Borderlands 2 DLC may skate on the sand a la Star Wars [/quote<] Day 0 DLC can suck a D.

      • mcnabney
      • 7 years ago

      Another game that I will now wait for GOTY version. I just got Mass Effect 3 with all DLC for $20.

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      Isn’t the first DLC pack for Borderlands 2 free?

    • mutarasector
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]It's official: The era of the personal computer is over - AllThingsD [/quote<] So I take it tablet sales are on the decline now, too? Dadgummit! I missed it...an 'm'piggy bank was almost full'nuf t'buy one for the young'uns!

    • hasseb64
    • 7 years ago

    “I.Tech ARP’s BIOS option of the week ”
    Poor people their biz model is really out of steam.

    • kyboshed
    • 7 years ago

    From “Nokia joins Samsung in slamming iPhone 5”

    Maybe Nokia should concentrate on getting their new flagship out of the door before slamming their competitor’s?

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    From “Nokia joins Samsung in slamming iPhone 5”

    It’s obvious who the leader is when others compare themselves to you and/or take potshots at you. I’m not an iPhone 5 fan (I’ve said that a thousand times), but I do respect it and realize Apple is the real standard bearer here. It may not have NFC or wireless charging (and maybe some other things), but the iPhone brand/product has become iconic. It has joined the Hall of Fame with the likes of Walkman, iPod and iPad, and it’s interesting to note that many of Apple’s products have become [i<]the[/i<] standard bearer, the household name, for their respective categories. This news about Nokia and Samsung comparing themselves to iPhone and saying they're better is just that. If there's a take-home lesson here, it's that Apple needs to keep on their toes and always look at their rear-view mirror because everyone else is gunning for them.

      • destroy.all.monsters
      • 7 years ago

      I think the reason that Apple doesn’t have all that much to worry about is due to execution on the part of other phone makers. There’s a degree of polish and attention to UI that no one else seems to manage. Apple concerns itself with the total package in a way that typically boutique manufacturers do.

      I’m not a fan and I don’t own anything Apple but I think that no matter how much you begrudge the ink devoted to them or the cult like behavior of their owners one has to respect the attention to detail.

      • blastdoor
      • 7 years ago

      Going negative in advertising is clearly something that Apple has done in the past, so one can hardly blame these guys for following a similar strategy. But it is a tricky thing. You cannot come across as mean-spirited or petty. Also, it helps when you are a clear underdog. These days, I suppose Nokia is a clear underdog. But in Samsung’s case, this is not nearly as clear. Samsung sells way more smart phones than Apple worldwide.

      Another thing that helps is if you have a meaningfully differentiated product that is clearly more appealing to at least a market niche then the leader. Obviously, the Macintosh met that criteria. And, I think it is arguable that Nokia’s phones also meet that criteria. However, Samsung’s phones do not in my opinion.

      So, I predict that Nokia may gain some traction with these ads, but that Samsung will not.

        • PixelArmy
        • 7 years ago

        Did you even read what Nokia said? Article is trolling…
        [quote<]Lumia 920: Wireless charging, amazing camera, screen you can use with gloves on and much more. No, it doesn't take a genius. #switchtolumia[/quote<] Given their current market share, #switchtolumia can mean [i<]anyone[/i<]. Hardly qualifies as negative advertising. The only "slam" would be if Apple claims exclusive rights to the word "genius". They probably trademarked it... Mensa you should be on alert for a lawsuit...

    • Arclight
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]IV.OCC's PowerColor Devil 13 HD 7990 review[/quote<] Imagine that the parents of a christian or muslim boy find out that their son bought a video card from the devil. Hilarity ensues.

    • Arclight
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]I.It's official: The era of the personal computer is over - AllThingsD[/quote<] [quote<]During that period, PCs accounted for the consumption of 49 percent of DRAM produced around the world, down from 50.2 percent in the first quarter of the year. The share of these chips going into PCs — both desktop and notebooks — has been hovering at or near 55 percent since early 2008, IHS says.[/quote<] [quote<]And where are all those memory chips going? Tablets and smartphones for starters. IHS says that phones consumed more than 13 percent percent of memory chips manufactured, and it expects that figure to grow to nearly 20 percent by the end of this year. Tablets — including the iPad — consumed only 2.7 percent of the world’s memory chip supply. The remaining 35 percent, which IHS classifies as “other,” includes servers, professional workstations, and presumably specialized applications like supercomputers and embedded systems.[/quote<] desktop+notebooks=49% servers+workstations=35% phones+tablets= 16% Uh oh, so the new era of post PC (btw smartphones and tablets are also PCs but don't tell them) is governed by minorities......i mean even if they represent a measly 16% it's the cool 16% of the market.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      “Markets that barely existed not long ago and are growing fast will take an increasing percentage of DRAM shipments.”

      An increasing percentage ?…HOLY MATH BATMAN!

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        What’s funny about these articles are how they selectively use percentages and absolute market size and have little to no real analysis. As destroy.all.monsters said, they are trying to create an either/or dichotomy when it’s really not.

        There was a recent article that said something like ‘There will be an overall growth of 50% and PC portion will drop from 41% to 29%.’ Well gee, that sounds bad doesn’t it, 41% to 29%!? Except it means the sales will remain roughly flat because the overall sales will grow 50% (math: 29%*1.5=43.5% normalized to the current market size) Even the original articles didn’t do that math, and a lot of the derivative articles didn’t mention the 50% overall increase at all. Too many people trying to talk up their position, or too many stupid people who can post stuff on the internet and get instant credibility.

        Krogoth has his usually banal but true statement about computers being ‘fast enough’ (although I would say the ‘minimum’ is a dual-core, and more like Core 2 era.) When the current one breaks they’ll get a new one, the PC market just isn’t high growth any more that’s all…which is exactly what the projections everyone is bandying about say.

      • Krogoth
      • 7 years ago

      Another near-sighted marketing piece.

      The only thing that is dying is the traditional desktop PC (tower + keyboard/mice) in the mainstream arena. Average Joe is hanging onto their existing desktops, while they are getting newer portable systems to handle their general computing needs.

      The reason is simple. The mainstream market reached a plateau for the demand for more computing power. It has been that way since Pentium 4/Athlon 64 era. The only difference from then is that power consumption of your average mainstream CPU has decreased to the point that portable platforms have the same level of computing performance without killing battery life (hours worth depending on the workload). It is no surprise that portable platforms get the nod over traditional desktop systems. You something that is highly portable, but can effortlessly handle your general computing needs without too much hassle.

      • destroy.all.monsters
      • 7 years ago

      The either/or dichotomy being put across by the media (and even some here) is ridiculous. It’s a new market and a somewhat different one but it isn’t going to displace personal computers including laptops (and let’s be honest – even the Surface is a laptop since it comes with a keyboard. It’s just a laptop with a touchscreen) any time soon. Given how well most tablets have done outside of the ipad and kindle I have my doubts we’re seeing anything other than a momentary change in the market in the same way that netbooks were.

      It’s just the usual attempt at grabbing page hits and as usual, has nothing of substance to support it’s claim. “Haha! Made you look!” That’s why I frequent this site – real reporting and amusing but not dishonest headlines.

      That and the pie.

        • BabelHuber
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]The either/or dichotomy being put across by the media (and even some here) is ridiculous. It's a new market and a somewhat different one but it isn't going to displace personal computers including laptops[/quote<] Yes, a lot of folks here (like myself) won't replace their desktops/ notebooks with a tablet or even a smartphone. But OTOH the people who only browse the web and write E-mails could also use a Win RT device or an Asus Transformer tablet to fulfill their needs. Additionally, in the third world, a lot of people hardly can afford a smartphone, so this is the computing device which they have to use for everything. In 2012, for the first time Windows won't be the dominating OS on new devices, there will be more new Android devices than Windows devices. So while I do think that the market is changing, I don't think tablets and smartphones will replace notebooks/ desktops in the 1st world anytime soon. In the 3rd world, there is nothing to be replaced - most people there don't own a notebook anyways. So smartphones only add additional computing devices, albeit in huge numbers.

          • destroy.all.monsters
          • 7 years ago

          However even those people (with the caveat of it being people I’ve spoken with) realize the platform’s limitations. Are tablets the best thing ever for pdfs, ebooks, textbooks etc.? You bet. Is it good for content consumption? Sure. Creation – not so much. I realize that I’m writing to someone that’s largely of the same mind set but I don’t see people getting a lot of joy out of writing long emails, those horrible holiday letters that a certain part of the population love to write, or doing spreadsheet work or even something akin to quicken. I think the primary difference is that it is for casual computing which is what it excels at. To me the fact that keyboards are even offered for tablets by their manufacturers are a tacit acceptance that real work cannot be done without them (and thus reinforcing the need for laptops or their workalikes).

          Thing is that between Apple and Amazon there doesn’t seem to be a lot of space left for others. Pundits and analysts keep claiming there’s this vast market there – and yet other than those two suppliers none of the other manufacturers are doing all that well with them.

          I think you’d be surprised about how many smartphones are in third world countries. They mostly use Symbian variants though – which are still quite inexpensive. You have a point though – when I can go into a drug store and see a no-name brand Android tablet in reach of pretty much anyone available it should do wonders for the third world with one significant caveat – netbooks still exist and despite all their drawbacks are easier to do real work on. I’m not arguing that in some ways tablets aren’t a game changer – just that they have their place and that place is largely in a supplementary role.

          “In 2012, for the first time Windows won’t be the dominating OS on new devices, there will be more new Android devices than Windows devices.”

          I’m not sure what metric you’re going by but smartphones have never been MS’es forte. They’ve never been anything other than a tiny niche in that space – at least as far back as I can readily recall. I don’t think that if you counted all handhelds with an OS dating back that you could honestly count MS (both on the mobile and desktop fronts) as shipping more units. However I could be wrong about that. I do think that this mobile based strategy of MS’es is going to bite it in the butt something fierce but that’s somewhat off-topic.

          Anyway, good points. I wonder what will happen in third world countries since Nokia decided to put the pillow over Symbian’s face. I’d guess that Android will be the new inexpensive and accessible OS there.

            • BabelHuber
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<] Are tablets the best thing ever for pdfs, ebooks, textbooks etc.? You bet. Is it good for content consumption? Sure. Creation - not so much.[/quote<] 100% agree. [quote<]I realize that I'm writing to someone that's largely of the same mind set but I don't see people getting a lot of joy out of writing long emails, those horrible holiday letters that a certain part of the population love to write, or doing spreadsheet work or even something akin to quicken.[/quote<] Writing E-Mails with Google Mail works surprisingly well on the Asus Transformers, as long as you connect the dock and a mouse (and don't mind the small keyboard, of course). Spreadsheets etc. are another story - forget the Transformer, power up your Notebook/desktop instead. [quote<]I think you'd be surprised about how many smartphones are in third world countries. They mostly use Symbian variants though[/quote<] I know, but Symbian is on a sharp decline since Nokia has declared it being a dead platform. Most new smartphones sold there run Android. [quote<]I'm not sure what metric you're going by but smartphones have never been MS'es forte. [/quote<] My metric is devices sold in 2012. As it looks right now, more Android devices will be sold worldwide (IIRC estimates are ~350 Million for Windows and >400 Millions for Android in 2012). Of course right now we have an installed base of more than a Billion Windows-devices vs. 480 Million Android devices. If the current trend in sales stays, Android could surpass Windows in 2014 regarding installed base, though. [quote<]I wonder what will happen in third world countries since Nokia decided to put the pillow over Symbian's face. I'd guess that Android will be the new inexpensive and accessible OS there.[/quote<] It's more than a guess meanwhile: IIRC, Nokia had a market share of 77% in China's smartphone market in 2010 regarding sales. The last numbers were 81% Android in Q2 2012 (Nokia 6% or so). As ex-Nokia fan, I always get upset when I see such numbers, BTW. It shows how miserably the new Nokia strategy of Windows-only has failed. Instead of adding WP to the Nokia portfolio, these imbeciles not only tried to immediately replace Symbian with WP, but also badmouthed their own products ('burning platform' and so). Result: The biggest smartphone vendor from 18 months ago became a niche player. I'd bet money that this will turn into a future case study for MBA-students. Topic: How [B]not[/B] to run a Fortune 500-company.

            • destroy.all.monsters
            • 7 years ago

            Yeah I agree. Still the need for the keyboard (and mouse to a lesser degree).

            Re: rate of purchase – I wasn’t aware it was so many. That will be crazy when (since it looks more likely than if at the current rate) Android devices outnumber Windows ones. I still don’t see Android making much of a dent in desktops or traditional laptops (with or without touch screen).

            Totally agree with you about Nokia, it’s a damn shame and I don’t think they’re going to make it.

            Thanks for an informative and enjoyable conversation.

      • CMF04k
      • 7 years ago

      FFS, I guess they feel that if this is said enough times, It will somehow sway desktop/laptop users to drop what they are using, run out and buy an ipad/iphone? I was already in a bad mood, but now it’s worse. The guy needs his fingers cut off so tha… Never mind… Peanut butter jelly sammich will fix me right up. Happy reading folks.

      • xeridea
      • 7 years ago

      Yeah, this has been shouted from random market trend companies for years, and has never happened, and never will happen. Smartphones and tablets are ok for random web browsing and some games, but will never replace desktop or laptop. Productivity wise they are terrible, and are more of an auxiliary computing device than something useful (except for niche cases) that people buy to feel cool, or the illusion of usability. There are many things they are good for, but there will never be a post PC era where the PC magically fades into nothing like all these hitgrabbers are saying.

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      Arik Hesseldahl didn’t even bother looking at the IHS report. What a douche.

      What the number indicate is that non PC product are now using allot of DRAM,
      but PC are still using more DRAM then ever in the PC history, and still growing.

      Whats next ? we see an explosion of smart TV running Android or IOS and they start using more dram then smartphone or tablets and we have headline like “We are now in a post smart phone world, TV use more DRAM, the argument is over, we are in a post tablet world”

      People proclaiming their ignorance is entertaining, but the sad part is that a bunch of cows read that type of drivel like gospel.

      This is not a world where, if you have a smart phone you cant have a tablet, and if you have a tablet you can have a PC. It not a world of OR, its a world of AND.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]What a douche.[/quote<] You just figured out what the 'D' in 'AllThingsD' really means!

    • jdaven
    • 7 years ago

    “The era of the personal computer is over”

    The readers of TR will be the last place on the Internet to accept it.

      • Jigar
      • 7 years ago

      -1 you from my personal computer 🙂

      • hasseb64
      • 7 years ago

      True!

      • BoBzeBuilder
      • 7 years ago

      Agreed. Facts and fanboys don’t mix.

        • rrr
        • 7 years ago

        So facts and jdaven do not mix? Let me try anyway – in a blender.

          • superjawes
          • 7 years ago

          Will it blend? That is the question!

      • blastdoor
      • 7 years ago

      One thing the tech report has going for it is that it was not so narrowly focused on overclocking (or other super niche activities) like, for example, overclockers.com.

      Having said that, however, this website clearly has in the past catered to a build your own PC crowd. And that crowd is rapidly shrinking. But one of the great things about the Internet is that in a world of 6 billion people even a tiny miniscule little niche like DIY PC builders is big enough to support a website like this. So I’m sure the techreport will have many good years ahead of it, catering to the “installed base.”

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 7 years ago

        Is that crowd shrinking? I doubt it.

        The PC market as a whole is shrinking big time, but I bet the DIY crowd is about the same size.

          • MadManOriginal
          • 7 years ago

          The PC market as a percentage is shrinking, in absolute numbers it is flat to single-digit growth.

            • superjawes
            • 7 years ago

            Which makes perfect sense. The smartphone/tablet surge isn’t so much a 1:1 replacement as added functionality. You’re seeing PC users pick up these devices for mobile computing, not as a PC replacement.

            • Sam125
            • 7 years ago

            You should learn to interpret the numbers correctly.

            The consumption of dram of the PC market relative to the smartphone and tablet market is shrinking. That says nothing about the size of the PC market itself, only that the memory market is shifting to accommodate new products.

            I suppose that fact is easy to forget, seeing as how the metric used to measure supposed market size itself was flawed to begin with.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            Reply meant for BobbinThreadbare? Because you wrote the same thing I did.

            • Sam125
            • 7 years ago

            Nope, using DRAM distribution isn’t an accurate way to size such an overlapping market. Back when DRAM was used mainly for personal computers and servers, then sure that was accurate measure since a consumer wouldn’t purchase both a PC and a server. That same assumption is no longer valid today as several other posters have already stated that the typical consumer now have a PC in addition to smartphones and tablets.

            So long story short – Saying the PC market is shrinking because DRAM shipments to PCs is shrinking is just plain wrong and uses poor reasoning.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            Which is what I said, hence the confusion.

            • Sam125
            • 7 years ago

            No, you really didn’t. lol

            • superjawes
            • 7 years ago

            [quote=”MadManOriginal”<]The PC market as a percentage is shrinking, in absolute numbers it is flat to single-digit growth.[/quote<] [quote="Sam125"<]So long story short - Saying the PC market is shrinking because DRAM shipments to PCs is shrinking is just plain wrong and uses poor reasoning.[/quote<] That's pretty close...you are basically making the same point.

          • blastdoor
          • 7 years ago

          I’m not sure if it’s shrinking… I’ll bet the people who are in the best position to know that are the guys at newegg. It would be interesting to see a graph of CPU unit sales from them over the years, although I doubt they’d want to share that info for proprietary reasons.

          Of course, one thing that might help a lot is the addition of international markets. The DIY PC niche was probably mostly a US thing back in the late 90s. But now, as with the PC market overall, I suspect that most of the growth in DIYers is coming from international markets.

          Either way, though, I don’t think it matters too much, at least not for the prosperity of a high quality website like this. To make an extreme analogy, despite the popularity of cars there are still people who ride horses as a hobby, and I’m sure that the best businesses that cater to horse enthusiasts make plenty of money doing so.

      • Arclight
      • 7 years ago

      That’s true, but if you read the article that time has yet to come.

      • anotherengineer
      • 7 years ago

      OHHH NOES

      O wait, ‘the era’ [url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Era[/url<] hmmmm yep that has incorrect written all over it. Maybe the 'PC fad is fading and the smart phone tablet fad is now in full swing' would have been a better title. Must be difficult to CAD on a smart phone and tablet?

        • superjawes
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]Must be difficult to CAD on a smart phone and tablet?[/quote<]...but can it play Crysis?

          • Arclight
          • 7 years ago

          no.

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