Desktop Trinity boards pop up on Gigabyte’s site

AMD’s desktop Trinity APUs have yet to break cover, but that hasn’t stopped Gigabyte from detailing a couple of FM2 motherboards designed for the new processors. Navigate over to Gigabyte’s website, and you’ll find listings for the GA-F2A75M-D3H and GA-F2A85X-UP4. The latter is a full-sized ATX affair with a black PCB, so you know it’s targeted at enthusiasts. There’s even a bright red power button on the circuit board.

The GA-F2A85X-UP4 features Gigabyte’s latest Ultra Durable tech, which includes fancy MOSFETs from International Rectifier. Digital power circuitry feeds the APU, and there are separate “power zones” for the chip’s CPU and GPU components. Folks using the integrated Radeon will be able to choose from four different video outputs. Gigabyte is throwing in a copy of Lucid’s Virtu Universal MVP software to bolster the integrated graphics, as well.

If you want to run a discrete graphics card, no fewer than three PCIe x16 slots can be found on the board. The top two can be arranged in a dual-x8 config, while the third slot is limited to four lanes of bandwidth. AMD’s A85X platform hub provides the board with a whopping eight 6Gbps SATA ports, one of which is routed to the rear cluster. The chip also serves up four USB 3.0 ports, which are complemented by two more from an auxiliary Etron controller.

The microATX GA-F2A75M-D3H is considerably less exotic, with analog power circuitry and no Virtu software. This board has just two PCIe x16 slots, and they’re stuck in a x16/x4 config. The number of display outputs has been cut to three; DisplayPort is out but VGA, DVI-D, and HDMI connectors remain. That’s likely to be enough video outs for most folks. The six 6Gbps SATA and four USB 3.0 ports provided by the A75 platform hub should be plenty for typical systems, too.

There’s no information on how much the boards will cost, but you can bet the UP4 will be the pricier of the two. Seems like overkill for an APU whose primary appeal is likely to be its integrated graphics, though. Thanks to X-bit labs for the tip.

Comments closed
    • fantastic
    • 7 years ago

    Good old Gigabyte still has a serial port header on their newest motherboards. I only have two or three serial devices left and I expect them to never be used again. Yet I still have them…

      • swaaye
      • 7 years ago

      The can be found on motherboards from most of the manufacturers. Serial ports are definitely still used, just not by home users that much. At work I need one to access the employee time clock for example. The USB adapters work ok in this scenario, but those USB serial adapters aren’t perfect.

    • anotherengineer
    • 7 years ago

    [url<]http://www.techpowerup.com/172513/AMD-A-Series-quot-Trinity-quot-Desktop-APUs-Set-for-October-1-Launch.html[/url<]

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    I’m not in the Market for Trinity anymore, but I am pleased to see promising signs here:

    Micro ATX
    4 DIMM slots
    6 SATA3 ports
    CPU/IGP combination that is adequate in both the CPU [i<]and[/i<] IGP department. I hear people cry, "But Intel + discrete GPU is bettar yada yada yada...." and to them I say "Meh, Trinity looks like a cheaper, easier, tidier, small-form-factor solution. It will go well in the HTPC and small fileserver world, especially since those two roles are the same box for some people.

    • Unknown-Error
    • 7 years ago

    Unfortunately there will be plenty of people who’ll buy AMD based junk…

    .
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    😉

    • NeelyCam
    • 7 years ago

    Is this one of those “preorder the mobo NOW!! Trust us – it’s worth it! Trinity is *just*around*the*corner*, and it’ll be the awesummest! Don’t bother waiting for reviews – BUY IT NOW!!1!”

    I hope AMD fanbois learned from the “buy AM3+ now so you can switch to the magic-good BullDozer as soon as it’s out without worrying about mobos being out of stock… trust us, BD is GOOOOD”

    • raddude9
    • 7 years ago

    How about a Mini-ITX board? I’m thinking about building a new HTPC and Trinity is a contender at the moment.

      • UberGerbil
      • 7 years ago

      Yeah, that’s exactly the niche that would interest me most for this processor. Perhaps Zotac has something cooking.

      Though I have to say, at this point it’s going to take an awful lot to dethrone an Intel build even for this usage.

        • raddude9
        • 7 years ago

        The intels are good too, but at the moment the cheapest ivy bridge with HD4000 graphics is the Core i3 3225 (I could be wrong about that, so feel free to correct me) which is about $134 so that will be the main competition for me as I have some light gaming in mind too.

      • Derfer
      • 7 years ago

      Ditto. I was amazed at the lack of mini-itx boards for fm1. Obviously the best form factor for this platform. Hopefully they catch on this time around.

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 7 years ago

        Stick a Micro-ATX motherboard in a Silverstone Grandia GD05 case to start your HTPC build. Having four PCIe slots instead of one can be a big help.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 7 years ago

        I’m thinking desktop Trinity was just a bit hot for a mainstream mini PC. 65W to 100W is a lot for a small space, and small market. That said, I did look for one at one point.

          • heinsj24
          • 7 years ago

          I still view TDP arbitrary and near pseudo-science. T Junction Max – now thats a rating for concern.

          If Trinity is anything like Bulldozer, the default cpu configuration can be tweaked enough to make those TDP ratings meaningless.

      • chuckula
      • 7 years ago

      Excellent point. Considering that HTPC is exactly where Trinity has the greatest advantage over i3/i5 parts, I’d really be interested in seeing those sorts of solutions.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 7 years ago

      Yay for mini-ITX! Or better, [i<]mini-DTX[/i<].

    • LocalCitizen
    • 7 years ago

    DigiTimes reports that desktop Trinity is coming OCT 1
    [url<]http://www.digitimes.com/news/a20120917PD220.html[/url<]

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      And it’s DigiTimes so it’s got to be true! /sarcasm

    • derFunkenstein
    • 7 years ago

    Tell me why they’re going with a new socket again? They’re not even upgrading the chipset to a new re-marketed model number like they did the 900 series when BD launched.

      • Vulk
      • 7 years ago

      My understanding is that Trinity doesn’t have the same pin out. It’s closest relative Bulldozer doesn’t integrate graphics and has a radically different weave for the clock timing, and it’s not in the same family as Llano so that doesn’t seem shocking to me. I can easily see how the chipset integration might not change despite the socket change.

        • chuckula
        • 7 years ago

        Basically AMD had to bite the bullet and jump to FM-2 after only 1 year with FM-1 due to those differences you described. The talk seems to be that FM-2 will be around for a while (at least through Kaveri), but it does limit options for existing desktop Llano owners.

      • jensend
      • 7 years ago

      Llano’s “Turbo Core” could only use thermal headroom to boost CPU clocks. Trinity’s “Turbo Core 3.0” (Bulldozer was 2.0) can boost GPU power and clocks instead, improving performance in GPU-limited situations. Though there’s of course no official word from AMD, various sites around the web have claimed that the resulting difference in power delivery requirements is why Trinity’s pinouts had to be different from those used in FM1 and FS1.

      That Trinity wouldn’t use FM1 isn’t exactly news; it was confirmed roughly a year ago. If you’re still whining about it now, it’s because you’re looking for something to whine about.

        • flip-mode
        • 7 years ago

        Good post until the last sentence ruined it. What if he was just asking instead of whining?

          • derFunkenstein
          • 7 years ago

          To be whining I think would require me to actually own a Llano desktop, which I don’t. I’m just very surprised, given the lack of chipset differences.

          • jensend
          • 7 years ago

          Then maybe he would have satisfied his curiosity sometime in the past year, or he could have googled the answer or (*gasp*) bothered reading an article or review, rather than coming here to “ask” about it a year after the fact and then spend 2/3 of his post complaining about last year’s chipset model numbering.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            AMD fanboi is mad.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            +1

            • jensend
            • 7 years ago

            Oh, how cute! derFunk learned to make schoolyard taunts! Pretty soon he’ll be making adolescent remarks, and before you know it, our little troll will be all grown up!

            • flip-mode
            • 7 years ago

            I think he did the efficient thing and posed the question to a group of people where someone probably knew the answer.

        • chuckula
        • 7 years ago

        As an AMD fanboy, are you going to be completely honest and fair-minded by loudly and repeatedly screaming that turbo-boost should be turned off during any benchmark of Trinity because it is an evil marketing feature put in by [s<]Intel's[/s<] AMD's marketing department to cheat consumers? Or.. are you going to say that Turboboost is great and that AMD really invented first but Intel stole the idea from AMD because Intel hates consumers and puppies? I'm just curious.

          • heinsj24
          • 7 years ago

          Turboboost should always be turned off when comsuming puppies. Amtel says so.

          • jensend
          • 7 years ago

          You’re not curious. You’re just trying to pick another stupid schoolyard fight. You’re pathetic.

          I never objected to Intel’s use of Turbo Boost, and I’m not an AMD fanboy.

          I’m just sick and tired of the inanity around here where every single article has to turn into a “ZOMG AMD IZ TEH SUXXORZ” immaturity fest. Seemed plain to me that derFunk was trying to play that audience with his year-old complaints, like telling old tired stand-up lines, rather than trying to discern the facts.

      • heinsj24
      • 7 years ago

      Kind like when Intel went from LGA1156 to LGA1155… it’s better because they said so. Hell, at least AMD hasn’t changed their desktop heatsink mount since 2006.

      The A85X chipset is new. It supports 8xSATAIII (vs. 6) and supports RAID 5.

    • flip-mode
    • 7 years ago

    It is completely beyond reasonable how long it is taking Trinity to get to the desktop (not that I’ll be seeking it out when it does).

      • tbone8ty
      • 7 years ago

      they want to mask the launch of vishera fx with trinity desktop

      rumor is that fx-8350 is a waste of silicon (10% boost in performance and 10% increase in power consumption over bulldozer) lol fail

      I hope they discontinue the am3+ platform so they don’t get laughed any more

      kaveri is there only hope

      • heinsj24
      • 7 years ago

      Yes, it is.

      Supposedly, it was so AMD could clear Llano stock; but why buy a Llano when Trinity is available (soon).

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    Deja vu.

    Edit – I’m not sure folks here understand why I said this before thumbing me down. Ok, here is is, gerbils:

    This situation is not so different from when boards for Bulldozer were already out but the CPUs themselves were still MIA (Missing in Action). Now it looks like Trinity-supporting boards are starting to trickle out but the Trinity chips are still nowhere to be found except perhaps ES’s in the hands of the OEMs, but obviously that’s a different matter. If you’re a consumer who wants a Trinity chip you still can’t buy it from Newegg or Microcenter.

      • Alexko
      • 7 years ago

      Since we’re throwing French words around, I wonder if the guys from Etron (the company that provides the auxiliary USB controller) are aware that [i<]étron[/i<] is French for "big turd".

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