Rumor: Intel CEO calls Win8 half-baked, says that’s OK

Well, I’m definitely getting flashbacks of the Windows Vista launch. According to a report by Bloomberg, Intel CEO Paul Otellini has expressed reservations about the level of polish in Windows 8. Otellini apparently wasn’t speaking publicly; his statements were made during a company meeting in Taipei, Taiwan, and Bloomberg heard about them through an unnamed attendee.

"[Otellini] told employees in Taiwan that Microsoft Corp.’s Windows 8 operating system is being released before it’s fully ready," reports Bloomberg. "Improvements still need to be made to the software, Otellini told employees."

But despite the seemingly negative appraisal, Otellini allegedly went on to say, "Releasing the operating system before it’s fully baked is the right move, and Microsoft can make improvements after it ships."

In short, while Windows 8 may not be as polished as Intel would like, the chip maker may be perfectly content to have it out there sooner than later. Perhaps that’s partly because Windows 8 is spurring the development of Intel-powered tablets. We’re already heard about a number of those, including models from Asus, Dell, and Lenovo, just to name a few. Most of them seem to be too expensive to compete with the iPad, but they’re still more compelling than the few Win7 tablets out there. (Of course, Windows 8’s October 26 release should also give sales of regular PCs a nice boost in time for the holidays.)

Comments closed
    • Dr_b_
    • 7 years ago

    a nice gui makes you want to use it. tried windows 8 on the desktop but found it clunky, non-intuitive, and frustrating. its a huge shift in the way MS has done OS on the desktop, and its not a good one.

    If it was cool, or something fluid, enjoyable or sped up work flow which it clearly doesn’t, then there would be a different story to tell. not commenting on it for mobile/tablets, maybe it works there but i dont even want to try it now after seeing it on the desktop, and the market already has decent guis from Apple and Google already, what is it that win8 tile is offering that’s so much better than those, can’t see it.

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 7 years ago

    The reality is that Windows 8 has to launch soon rather than sooner or later. If they delay too much more, they’ll have no shot at all of catching up. But releasing early is risky because the haphazard way Metro and the desktop are integrated could turn users off the concept entirely. Metro’s already had two bad starts (ie., Zune HD and Windows 7 Phone). I don’t think it can survive another bad start. It’s already dragging the whole Windows 8 bandwagon down and that’s after they deleted the Zune and Metro branding that MS spent years trying to build up.

    I don’t think they can delete the “Modern UI” thoroughly enough to wash away the stink off a failed Windows 8 launch. So it’s the right move, but it’s because they’re desperate. They HAVE to release even if it’s incomplete or unpolished. They have to get Metro out there.

      • streagle27
      • 7 years ago

      “The reality is that Windows 8 has to launch soon rather than sooner or later. If they delay too much more, they’ll have no shot at all of catching up.”

      Catching up to whom, or what?

      Their only real competitor, is themselves. And the bad part is, they’re now losing.

      Maybe Metro needed to be released now, before the zombie apocalypse.

      We’re testing for the new user base.

      Zombies don’t care if their arms hurt, or how dumbed down and inefficient an OS is.

      They’re zombies.

        • ShadowTiger
        • 7 years ago

        Microsoft wants to get into the mobile space. They are afraid that tablets and phones might eat away at the Windows PC consumer market.

        The whole point behind metro is to get people used to the Microsoft mobile interface so that when they go shopping for phones or tablets it is familiar to them. They are basically betting that any customers they lose over shipping a bad PC experience will be made up in the long run as people start buying windows tablets and phones.

        I think they are doomed with this approach but theoretically it could work.

    • Farting Bob
    • 7 years ago

    I do feel like MS could eliminate 90% of the issues people have if they just made a tick box in the settings to “start up on desktop” instead of Metro. Why they seem determined to make that hard to do i dont know. They seem to forget that most people use windows on a desktop or laptop and will continue to do so for many years, and a touchscreen-friendly interface is not only not needed for that, it’s a big limitation.

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 7 years ago

      Why? Because you have to buy all your Metro Apps through the App store, that’s why. Microsoft knows exactly what it’s doing.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      you just have to push enter on boot. i get what you’re saying, but if pushing enter ruins your life, you’ve probably got bigger fish to fry.

      • Malphas
      • 7 years ago

      “Why they seem determined to make that hard to do i dont know.”

      It’s simple and it’s been said many times why they’ve went this route. Microsoft [i<]don't care[/i<] about desktop users with Windows 8, it's all about gaining traction in tablets, they desperately need developers to make Metro apps so are doing everything they can get away with to encourage the usage of Metro. Allowing users to boot straight past it and pretend it's Windows 7 flies totally contrary to that. Despite what people say on web forums there is no way people are going to switch to Linux, so Microsoft don't have to worry about the desktop and laptop market, which they completely dominate. I'd also argue on a sidenote that touchscreen with an appropriate GUI on small laptops is actually pretty useful. I don't think the anti-Metro crowd realise that the desktop market is shrinking and the majority of PCs these days are 15" and smaller notebooks (with the Ultrabook form factor encouraging 11-13" screens in particular).

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    Otellini: “Windows 8 sucks but it’s ok because folks planning to get our competitor’s [8-core] product hoping to get better performance by going with Win8 probably won’t be enticed to do so anymore and instead stick with Win7 and our products.”

    PS – I made this up.

    • OU812
    • 7 years ago

    It’s only half baked to Intel because they have to share with ARM.

    Intel wants to go back to WINTEL only.

    • Krogoth
    • 7 years ago

    Intel is actually saying “Windows 8” is going to cause a hit in their desktop sales, because, these days, the #1 buyer of deskop systems are businesses. Businesses have little or no interest in Windows 8, because it was never its primary target. Business are still migrating towards 7 or sticking with XP.

    Intel is also worry that Window 8 ARM version will begin to eat away at their mainstream line.

      • absurdity
      • 7 years ago

      Windows 8 will have very little effect on business purchases. New systems are purchased for the hardware, not the OS. Large businesses just image new systems with whatever OS they’ve standardized on, and small businesses will either go with the flow, or just choose to purchase new systems with Windows 7.

        • Scrotos
        • 7 years ago

        It’ll have a large effect once for me once I can’t get Win7 Pro desktops anymore. I’d rather not try to image something from the ground up if I can help it. Ugh. That was partly why we started migrating from XP to Win7–couldn’t buy XP preinstalled anymore. I guess I’m a small/medium business, something like 50 workstations and 15 servers.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 7 years ago

          Windows 8, like Vista and 7 before it, has downgrade rights.

    • chuckula
    • 7 years ago

    Of course Window 8 is half baked! The solution is another hit off the 6′ bong and there won’t be any more “half” about it.

    • sweatshopking
    • 7 years ago

    i’m not sure what part of it is “half baked”. the improved performance? the incremental updates? metro seems pretty solid at this point. without knowing what he was talking about, it’s hard to agree/disagree.

      • RhysAndrews
      • 7 years ago

      Personally, I think it’s some of the redundancy in controls that are left behind in the desktop/explorer environment. It doesn’t sit well with me that there is a simple control panel in metro for all the basic stuff, then all the advanced stuff in the explorer environment. Maybe it doesn’t sit well with Microsoft yet either, and we just don’t have a solution yet.

      Microsoft wants to put the desktop environment in the backseat as much as possible, such that it’s just ‘another app’. To do that, they need to make it much less essential for everybody, and also not appear like a ‘legacy environment’ there just to help us make the transition. I don’t really know how they’ll achieve that in a way that makes the more enthusiast PC users happy.

      Other than that I think Windows 8 is great. And the lack of start menu? Doesn’t bother me at all. In fact, the more I’ve used Windows 8, the less it’s frustrated me. We may have used start menu a whole lot for our, you know, ENTIRE LIVES, but while the Metro looks different, it doesn’t operate a whole lot differently. In particular, just typing what you’re after is something Windows Vista & 7 had and it’s far more modern a way to find your apps than browsing through the start menu.

        • streagle27
        • 7 years ago

        ” In particular, just typing what you’re after is something Windows Vista & 7 had and it’s far more modern a way to find your apps than browsing through the start menu.”

        Isn’t this why a GUI was designed? To NOT force newbie ‘consumers’ to memorize a billion commands?

        This is what made linux non-user friendly, as well as DOS.

        Experienced users already know the commands, but obviously still appreciate a user-friendly and efficient desktop GUI i.e. a start menu and quick launch toolbar ala Win7.

        I guess it was technically impossible for MS developers to improve on that, or perhaps the brainiacs in charge made it impossible for them to implement them properly in Windows 8.

        While it’s a good thing to try to make a UI that is more newbie friendly so as to increase adoption and sales, dumbing things down sometimes is not the best way to go.

        If you want to use a smart phone such as an iPhone or a Droid, you’re just going to have to learn how to use them.

        If someone want to do some non-trivial and advanced graphics editing using Photoshop’s capabilities, they’re just going to have to learn Photoshop.

        If you want to run a nuclear power-plant, you’re just going to have to learn a whole mess of new things and acquire those skills so that you don’t blow yourself up along with everyone else in a several mile radius.

        With technology, sometimes people just have to learn it to be able to use it.

        If people want to be able to type faster than they can with just one or two fingers at a time, they’re just going to have to learn to touch-type.

        So now MS is forcing people to memorize commands, AND be able to type.

        Nice!

          • Malphas
          • 7 years ago

          Typing the first few letters of the application you want to launch is not memorising commands, streagle.

            • streagle27
            • 7 years ago

            Are you serious?

            How do you propose someone new to Windows will find out what to type in the first place, if there is no start menu?

            Oh wait, there’s those huge tiles on the desktop. Oh wait, there isn’t, because that’s the exact reason the user needs to know what to type.

            There’s no tile for it.

            Maybe the user should scroll through several screens of tiles on his 24in touch screen, 8 hours a day, and develop deltoids the size of coconuts so as to maximize their user ‘experience’.

            • streagle27
            • 7 years ago

            “Maybe the user should scroll through several screens of tiles on his 24in touch screen, 8 hours a day, and develop deltoids the size of coconuts so as to maximize their user ‘experience’.”

            One might attempt to counter the coconut-deltoid argument above, by suggesting MS simply make those tiles smaller and smaller, and ensure that every app and command has a tile associated with it.

            But then there are too many tiles, and the deltoids are now the size of watermelons!

            I can’t see my desktop wallpaper, my whole desktop for several screens is covered in tiles!

            My arms hurt!

            Someone suggests.. Let’s use a mouse!

            And let’s make the tiles even smaller, and easier to access, and efficient!

            Let’s make a Start Menu, and implement a Quick Launch Toolbar for the most oft-used apps!

            GENIUS!

      • bcronce
      • 7 years ago

      Win8 is architecturally sound, it’s the UI that is having issues.

      If the UI is “better”, less of the issue and the fact that is it VERY different and being forced. Not to mention the inconsistencies where some of the “old” UI is used in part of Win8 and Metro in others, in non-predictable ways.

        • Malphas
        • 7 years ago

        “If the UI is “better”, less of the issue and the fact that is it VERY different and being forced. Not to mention the inconsistencies where some of the “old” UI is used in part of Win8 and Metro in others, in non-predictable ways.”

        For the same reason the old MSDOS mode was carried on into Windows 95, 98 and ME. It’s a legacy issue.

        I know all the Windows 8 haters think it’s going to fail dismally (as they wrongly believe Vista did) and Windows 9 is going to go back to their comfort zone, but they’re sadly mistaken, it wont. Windows 8 is bound to have teething issues, that happens whenever a major overhaul is undertaken, but it’s finally going to get Microsoft some sort of foothold in the growing ARM/tablet sector and introduce a bundled Microsoft “app store” into the Windows environment, and those are their two major goals with this version. Expect Windows 9 to be even more Metrofied, much more consistent and polished, with the old Desktop mode being pushed even further behind the scenes.

          • Spunjji
          • 7 years ago

          I’m amazed by the amount of negative votes a lot of sensible posts like this one are getting.

            • DarkUltra
            • 7 years ago

            Because in Windows 7, you could search for three different items at once, programs, files and settings when pressing windows key. In Windows 8, you need to press down, down and enter before you could search for files. This is a big, and utterly unecessary step backwards for desktop users. You also can’t drag and drop items from the start menu to open programs or folders; the thing takes up the whole screen.

            It is also no longer possible to press windows key, right arrow and enter to shut down the computer. If they are going to make something new, it must truly be better. I’ve used Windows 8 for half a year, and I still don’t use a single Metro App; I actually don’t even look at the tiles but use it only to search-start programs because the start screen does not auto populate with recently use programs. Another way to marginalize the desktop user by Microsoft. The calendar, email, tweetro, ie and picture apps are so pixel bloated and feature deprived I will never use them, but have the desktop equivalents all open at once, besides each other showing the same information, on my desktop.

            I do enjoy very much the improved dwm rendering on my 120hz monitor, though. In Windows 7 animations and window movements often only rendered at 60hz:

            [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ScFAvPN7aJM[/url<] And yup, 120hz also greatly improves desktop mode 🙂 - The ASUS VG236H was my first exposure to 120Hz refresh displays that aren’t CRTs, and the difference is about as subtle as a dump truck driving through your living room. anandtech.com/show/3842/asus-vg236h-review-our-first-look-at-120hz

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]metro seems pretty solid at this point. [/quote<] No, no, no there you go getting things confused again. Solid is a KDE technology. [url<]http://techbase.kde.org/Development/Tutorials/Solid/Introduction[/url<]

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      The improved performance is invisible. How often do you cold boot you PC?
      I had windows8 and 7 on th same system, I saw no performance improvement worth mentioning.

      Incremental updates? windows8 is a downgrade. What took 2 click is now done via multi layer hidden hot spot menu.
      Full screen Flashes when starting desktop apps, and yes, the metro apps are half baked.
      Just look how you scroll touch based app with a mouse… cant grab the page with a mouse click, like you would with your finger. no you have to use an auto hiding scroll bar at the bottom of the page. etc..

      Windows8 does feel half baked. like a freak monster of a tablet OS and a desktop badly integrated.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        i boot multiple times a day. i don’t leave my computers running pretty much ever.

          • Meadows
          • 7 years ago

          A terrible habit that you should break.

          • End User
          • 7 years ago

          Why?

          My main Windows 8 rig wakes from sleep by itself so I have been powering it off until I find a solution.. I can’t stand powering off and on – such a backwards way of doing things.

            • Krogoth
            • 7 years ago

            Have you check to see if Wake-on-LAN is on?

            It could also be your keyboard and mouse is acting up as well. You can disable wake-up for them via the control panel or device manager.

      • NewfieBullet
      • 7 years ago

      The `half baked` part is the horrible `Metro bolted onto desktop` UI. Metro may be great for tablets and phones but it is a schizophrenic mess on the desktop.

    • mganai
    • 7 years ago

    Dear Microsoft: Please create a desktop mode for non-touchpad peeps.

    Dear Intel: Please don’t lag, or skimp, on the desktop parts. (Or repeat the $100 hyperthreading tax. It’s just the principle.)

      • Krogoth
      • 7 years ago

      It is already there.

      Use Windows Key +D to get access to the classical desktop. You can recreate the standard icon suite (My Computer etc) under a few minutes.

        • sschaem
        • 7 years ago

        How do you stop those full screen flash when using the windows key?
        How to you recreate the start menu?
        How to you get rid of those silly hidden hot spot multi-layer menu ?
        etc.. etc..

        Windows8 adds NOTHING over windows7, it just eliminate the smooth keyboard/mouse workflow.

          • Krogoth
          • 7 years ago

          Start Menu became the “Start Screen” which is default area that you log into. >_<

          I don’t see the problem with “hotspots”. It is just an evolving of clicking the mouse on a certain area of the screen to bring-up a certain menu. I suppose that muscle memory and habits build from previous UIs are hard to break. The differences between Windows 7/Vista UI to 8 is like the jump from 9x to XP or Windows 3.1 to 9x. You even have the same complains from users who didn’t like the new layout of UI.

          History is just repeating itself.

    • jdaven
    • 7 years ago

    “…Microsoft can make improvements after it ships.”

    Yeah, it’s called Windows 9.

      • jackbomb
      • 7 years ago

      God I hope so. I really don’t want to switch to Linux.

        • Malphas
        • 7 years ago

        You’d switch to Linux (entirely different architecture, different third-party software, and a different GUI anyway) because Windows 8 requires you to launch applications slightly differently (Start Screen vs Start Menu) or make a single mouse click to get back to the UI you’re used to? Absolute hyperbole and idiocy.

          • jackbomb
          • 7 years ago

          I would definitely consider it.
          The constant switching between the desktop and Modern interface just makes Win8 feel rather unpolished and half-baked. I just can’t get used to it. It’s just like the “newbie friendly” software that Packard Bell and Compaq used to run on top of Windows 95…except that Microsoft’s newb-friendly interface can’t be uninstalled.

            • Malphas
            • 7 years ago

            If you’re easily upset by Metro, which is a minor irritation at worst then there is no way in hell you’re going to cope with using Linux daily.

            • faramir
            • 7 years ago

            I have Kubuntu 12.04 LTS set up on my laptop and KDE looks pretty much like Windows – a hybrid of WinXP and Win7 features. For instance: I prefer the full program names in taskbar (XP) over lone icons (7) but I do like the app preview when switching (7). Start menu is similar, window behavior is similar/same, etc.

            I’ve been using Slackware since 1995, NetBSD for 5+ years. I am used to CLI but the way Kubuntu looks nowadays is a huge step forward and I don’t think any regular Windows users would have problems adapting to it.

            (oh and I couldn’t be bothered with the stock Ubuntu thanks to their imbecillic decision to stick the “dock” thing to the vertical edge of the screen rather than allowing users to position it anywhere they want to)

            • Squeazle
            • 7 years ago

            Unless you’re hitting the games real hard, there is really not much of a hassle in switching to Linux. Just figure you spend in time what you save in money on researching the right programs and version, and it’s quite a simple conversion process.

          • Krogoth
          • 7 years ago

          I don’t get all of the hate either.

          Windows 8 simply doesn’t offer anything compelling over Windows 7/Vista other than the “Metro” app store front-end.

          You can go back to the classical desktop by using Windows Key + D and recreate the standard icon suite under a few minutes.

            • A_Pickle
            • 7 years ago

            I actually rather like the new Windows Explorer and the new Task Manager.

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 7 years ago

            And you can run [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Process_Explorer<]Process Explorer[/url<] (free) on all Windows 9x-W8, replacing the default task manager. The new task manager IS Process Explorer LITE, and that is not a valid reason to like windows 8. Same thing with the Explorer, as there are various [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_file_managers<]alternative[/url<] file managers available. Microsoft's new GUI is looks and feels like PlaySkool made it. Whomever likes it is just admitting their level of intelligence and actual computer experience, which is little or none. Truthfully, the explorer in XP was the best one Microsoft ever made, with the most features. Tons of options have been removed since Vista, and 8 just takes that same interface and plasters a short bus GUI with big buttons all over it.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]Microsoft's new GUI is looks and feels like PlaySkool made it [/quote<] and yet EVERYBODY is copying it. google did with the play store, valve did with big picture mode, the new my____ is pretty metrofied, the list goes on. if the fact that the UI was ugly and unusable, i doubt EVERY company would be cloning it. the fact that the metro language is usable, sexy, and fresh is the reason it's being cloned.

            • Scrotos
            • 7 years ago

            Wait, everyone is copying Microsoft? Or was Microsoft jumping on the bandwagon from other companies and tablet/phone OS makers? Wasn’t there some prior art brought up in the Samsung trial that shows this type of UI has been around far before MS tried to make a tablet-orientated OS? (yes, even that XP version)

            Oh, no, wait, my mistake. I guess Microsoft does have some old IP that covers big, clunky icons: [url<]http://www.guidebookgallery.org/screenshots/win101[/url<]

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            No. metro is undisputed Microsoft. you can pretend it looks like that, but it’s a clear UI, that looks great. the overhauls to livemail vs outlook are gorgeous.

            So to answer your first question, everyone is copying MS.

            • Chrispy_
            • 7 years ago

            I know it’s off topic, but your link had me nostalgically looking at the file manager in Windows 3.11.

            I think 1993 is the last time Microsoft shipped a file-manager that was usable in its default state!

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      A.K.A Windows7 Pro

      • Vhalidictes
      • 7 years ago

      Interesting. I guess there are people out there who have never used Windows XP without service packs.

    • Decelerate
    • 7 years ago

    Sometimes I hate the advent of patches; more specifically the [i<]taken-for-granted[/i<] part of it...

    • indeego
    • 7 years ago

    Microsoft recognizes this, hence the cheapo pricetag.

      • Rand
      • 7 years ago

      It’s cheap so they can push people over to Metro sooner, the potential revenue from Metro app sales far exceeds the revenue from OS sales.
      MS is probably far more concerned about how many people use Metro primarily/exclusively then how many people use Windows 8 as a whole.

      If everyone on earth buys Windows 8, and no one uses Metro then I don’t think MS would consider Windows 8 a big success even if that meant it was the fastest selling OS in history.

      When you can get a 30% chunk off every application anyone uses, you can sell advertising in all those apps, you have built in apps focused on selling to your Music/Video/Game store and heavy integration with XBox/Windows Phone there is vastly more potential income from Metro then there ever would be from OS licensing.

      You’ll even get money for purely free applications with no advertising built in from the developer paying you to put it up on the Metro store.

      And even all of that is ignoring the fact that Windows 8 is their first real viable tablet OS, opening up an entirely new and rapidly growing market for them.

      • Krogoth
      • 7 years ago

      No, they want mainstream to get hook onto Metro a.k.a app store front-end.

      They figured that they will easily make-up the difference through time with microtransactions.

      The future of commercial software is micro-transactions, whatever you like it or not.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        no comment meadows? you’re going to let that slide?

    • Ari Atari
    • 7 years ago

    I think it’s a problem of the chicken and the egg. The touch capable hardware that makes windows 8 nice won’t be produced unless windows 8 is already out, but windows 8 will fail because nothing in the past had touch capabilities, as in desktops or most laptops. Then there’s the things that they seem to want to shove down our throats…

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