Office 2013 hits release-to-manufacturing status

As we’ve pointed out before, Microsoft isn’t just refreshing its PC and phone operating systems this year. It also has a new version of Office up its sleeve. Late yesterday, the company updated the Office News blog to say Office 2013 is officially complete. The new version of the productivity suite has reached “release to manufacturing” status, meaning the final build that will show up on software DVDs (and as a download on the Microsoft Store) is now ready.

Microsoft hasn’t set a date for Office 2013’s retail rollout yet, but it says “general availability” is scheduled for the first quarter of next year. Some folks are going to get an early taste, though. ARM-powered Windows RT devices will ship with a preview build of Office Home & Student RT when they come out on October 26, and Microsoft’s Volume Licensing customers are going to get access to the RTM build of Office 2013 “by mid-November.” TechNet and MSDN subscribers will get access by mid-November, as well.

If you need a copy of Office now and don’t want to buy the old version, don’t worry. Microsoft has set up an upgrade program that will kick off on October 19. Folks who buy Office 2010 from “local retailers or resellers” after that date will get a free upgrade to Office 2013 once it’s available. That program mirrors Microsoft’s Windows 8 upgrade scheme, which has been running since June, except there appears to be no cost involved here. (Windows 8 upgrades cost $14.99 for PCs purchased after June 2, but Microsoft clearly states Office 2013 upgrades will be made available “for free.”)

Comments closed
    • rrr
    • 7 years ago

    Meh, why bother paying, when you can get LibreOffice for free without pirating? Oh right, all cool kids use MS Office straight from Torrent, only nerds use open source stuff.

    • willmore
    • 7 years ago

    Great, I’m going to share this with my wife. She came home yesterday complaining that they (corporate IT) had updated her computer to Office 2010 (the one with the ribbon). Her comment was “So, I didn’t get any work done today.”

    It made me ponder. Isn’t the reason corporate environments stay with Microsoft so that they don’t have to retrain their users–since Microsoft application knowledge is considered ‘baseline’? Well, of what value is Microsoft when they break that rule by requiring retraining of their users?

      • Sargent Duck
      • 7 years ago

      It was actually 2007 that brought the Ribbon Interface.

      And no, the reason corporations stay with Office is because its the default. Everything supports it and everybody knows it. Sure, a company could move to a free alternative like Open Office, but many business programs don’t support it. Then you have to make sure your IT knows how to properly support it. And since it’s free, Oracle could one day decide it’s not worth investing any more resources into it and just pull the plug. With Office, none of that applies.

      And user interface is subjective. I hated the menu system in 2003, but had mastered the ribbon interface in 2007 in about 5 minutes and was way more productive than I ever was with 2003. So it’s subjective.

        • Shambles
        • 7 years ago

        Free yourself from Oracle. Libre Office >> Open Office.

          • Sargent Duck
          • 7 years ago

          Haha, thanks, but I’m a huge Office 2007/2010 fan and have no problem forking over the money for Office.

      • just brew it!
      • 7 years ago

      I think OpenOffice missed a huge opportunity to grab market share. In the years immediately following the release of Office 2007 the OpenOffice project was in turmoil (eventually resulting in the LibreOffice fork); the confusion and uncertainty this created probably scared a lot of people away. OpenOffice/LibreOffice’s UI is more like “classic” MS Office than the UI of current versions of MS Office are.

      Likewise, I think Ubuntu is blowing a similar opportunity by ditching the traditional “desktop with Start menu” paradigm just as Windows is transitioning away from it too.

      People don’t like change for change’s sake. Unless the new version is clearly superior in some way, and not clearly inferior in any way, you’re going to get a lot of grumbling.

      • indeego
      • 7 years ago

      We migrated people from 2003–>2010 and there were very few issues. Nobody can imagine going back to 2003 now. (We demo’d 2007 and immediately disliked it.) Microsoft listened, I guess?

    • chuckula
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]Office 2013 hits release-to-manufacturing[/quote<] Well I think that's more than enough evidence to have Office 2013 arrested for battery before it can do any more harm.

      • dpaus
      • 7 years ago

      Oh, sure, blame the hardware!

        • 5150
        • 7 years ago

        Did you see how it was manufactured!? It was asking for it!

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    Has anyone in my position (corporate IT) tried this on users yet?

    Over the last decade, the only complaint users have had with Office is that they keep changing the bloody interface.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      its the same interface, prettied up, with more skydrive integration.

      • Forge
      • 7 years ago

      I’m continually surprised how many of my users insist that Office 2007 is no good for them, and that they want Office 2010 back (nevermind the unused 100 seats of 2007 I have, and the fully exhausted Office 2010 license).

        • ludi
        • 7 years ago

        Maybe people are intimidated by the background colors. Word ’07 is a sea of tumultuous blue, on the verge of sucking you into Narnia, while Word ’10 defaults to more traditional whites and grays and keeps the colors mostly confined to the edges of the window.

    • sweatshopking
    • 7 years ago

    I know lots of you guys hate metro, but this is the prettiest office software on the market. AND AS YOU KNOW, PRETTY IS WHAT MATTERS.

      • Geistbar
      • 7 years ago

      Are you subtly trying to tell me that I don’t matter?

        • dpaus
        • 7 years ago

        Oh, no, no, no, no!!

        He’s not trying to be subtle about it at all.

      • Diplomacy42
      • 7 years ago

      actually usable is what matters.

      vista was pretty, but it was eviscerated.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        no. you’re wrong. i’d gladly sacrifice usability for pretty

          • Jigar
          • 7 years ago

          You are trolling Apple fan-boys aren’t you 😉

            • dpaus
            • 7 years ago

            Naw, he’s just repeating what his wife says all the time.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            and she married me!!!!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This