Windows 8 now available for pre-order

If you’re running Windows XP, Vista, or 7, you’ll be able to upgrade to Win8 for just $40 when the new OS becomes available on October 26. That’s for a downloadable copy, by the way. If you want a retail-boxed DVD, you’ll need to shell out $70. According to the official Windows blog, you can pre-order those retail upgrades starting today. Newegg is now accepting orders for the Windows Pro upgrade DVD.

What if you’re building a new system and don’t have an old Windows license lying around? The full versions of Win8 are available for pre-order, as well. Windows 8 costs $100, while the Pro version runs $140. Those are OEM licenses meant for system builders; Newegg doesn’t seem to have the consumer-friendly retail boxes available right now. It does, however, offer a “Pro Pack” that upgrades the standard version to Win8 Pro. That option costs $70, which seems pricey given the $40 delta between OEM versions of the two operating systems.

Windows 8 comes in 32- and 64-bit flavors, and Newegg has ’em both. It’s hard to imagine folks with 32-bit systems itching to upgrade their OS, though. Seems like it would make much more sense to simply offer both flavors of the OS on the same DVD.

I suspect most enthusiasts making the transition to Windows 8 will opt for the $40 downloadable upgrade. I’ve had a couple of non-techie folks ask me about it in the last couple of weeks, too, so the word seems to be circulating outside the usual nerdy circles. I’m still on the fence about upgrading my own desktop PC, however. The OS has a handful of desktop enhancements that look really sweet, but I worry that Metro will taint the overall experience.

Comments closed
    • ET3D
    • 7 years ago

    I think I’ll buy the $40 upgrade “just in case”. Probably won’t use it any time soon, but I got enough free stuff from Microsoft over the years when I was a Microsoft MVP that I think paying something back won’t hurt. The foundation of Windows 8 looks solid enough that I’m sure it will could be a worthwhile upgrade at some point. Still, I only recently moved from Vista to 7, so no point in moving to 8 right away.

    • Kougar
    • 7 years ago

    For any Windows 8 buffs out there, is there a quick way to navigate to the startup folder? Without adding a link to it on the desktop, taskbar, etc?

    One issue I’ve already run into is that users must now manually navigate through the file system just to find the Startup folder to see what programs are set to auto-start. (Which will require a google just for most people to find) The start menu used to be the only quick way to navigate to this folder and check its contents as searching for it doesn’t work.

    (Before somebody claims otherwise, msconfig -> Startup shows registry settings and will NOT show links dropped into the Startup folder)

    Windows 8 is still Windows 7 at its core. As such I suspect there are more edge cases like this one just waiting to annoy more system users.

      • sqrtpi
      • 7 years ago

      Now with Windows 8 you can enable/disable startup programs from a tab in the Task Manager, this includes registry items and shortcuts in the startup folders.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        yeah, it’s WAYYYY better than with 7. quick, easy, and clear.

          • rrr
          • 7 years ago

          Just like your mom.

        • Kougar
        • 7 years ago

        This option doesn’t appear to exist in Windows Server 2012, the startup tab is not there. This may be because Startup options are disabled by default in Windows Server 2012, however it doesn’t stop a program from dropping links into the Startup folder anyway and launching that way.

        Edit: [url=http://i111.photobucket.com/albums/n129/Chanur64/Win8Manager.png<]Screenshot[/url<] I don't see a way to show it either... so this is still a problem for Server 2012 users. I'm running F@H on an experimental Windows Server 2012 I've been playing around with.

    • crsh1976
    • 7 years ago

    Genuine question here.

    Is there a clear advantage to upgrading to Win 8 if I’m currently satisfied with Win 7?

    My main use for my Windows PC is gaming, that’s about it – aside from the typical browsing/Youtubing/etc.

      • travbrad
      • 7 years ago

      For PC gaming probably not. Windows 8 is faster in some things but when it comes to gaming the performance is pretty much identical. Win8 is a bit faster (5-10%) in web browser benchmarks, but it’s doubtful that you’d actually notice a difference in real world use. Video/audio encoding show some 5-10% gains too. The biggest difference is probably in the boot/resume from sleep times, but that’s more important on the laptop/tablet side of things than for a desktop PC.

      It is a faster OS overall, but whether it’s worth $40 and the headaches of Metro is debatable. If you primarily care about gaming then you’d probably be better off saving that $40 and putting it towards your next GPU/CPU/etc

      • bcronce
      • 7 years ago

      If it isn’t broke, don’t fix it. That being said, don’t wait for end-of-life of Win7. If Win9 has come out, it’s probably time to upgrade or switch to your favorite Opensource OS/Distro if they have better game support by then.

      Go Steam on Linux!

      • moog
      • 7 years ago

      Maybe. Also Win8 will continue to improve (rollouts of features faster).

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      the netflix win 8 app is ballin

      • rrr
      • 7 years ago

      No. If you’re satisfied, that would be unnecessary waste of money.

      • BIF
      • 7 years ago

      If you only game and browse the web, I would say you don’t need to upgrade. In two years, my answer will be different, but right now you’ll be fine on Windows 7.

      If you are planning to buy a new PC next year or beyond, then you’ll probably get Windows 8 with the new system.

      • Malphas
      • 7 years ago

      There are some advantages yes, generally it’s a bit more reliable, boots and runs faster, generally improved, has Ribbon (which I personally think is superior to the File Menu) in Exporer etc., expanded Task Manager, and more modern hardware support built in like USB 3.0, UEFI, etc. So all in all, at the least you can consider it a sort of Windows 7 SP3, whether you feel that’s worth paying for to upgrade though is personal opinion I guess.

      As far as killer features go it all depends on what your usage patterns are like. The big ones are:

      Metro (Modern), obviously. Debatable as to how good/bad this is. Personally I think it’s not hugely useful on Desktop, but hardly the nightmare some idiots pretend it is either. In some ways it’s good but it’s still inconsistent right now, with requiring to flick back to the old desktop for most programs. On a tablet or small laptop, or with an entirely Metrofied ecosystem it will be good though.

      Microsoft Account Integration. – Long overdue, similar to how Android works for instance, let’s you maintain your preferences across multiple machines and such.

      App Store – Also overdue, similar to Android/iOS again or like repositories on Linux. Will take time before the transition from traditional disc/downloaded software to having a managed, automatically updated account with all your applications takes place though. Long term this is going to be a huge improvement though.

      Hyper-V – big feature for some people, irrelevant for others.

      Storage Spaces – Like being able to chuck hard drives into your machine and have a built-in Drobo. Usefulness will depend on what your existing backup/storage setup is like and how big a deal storage is to you.

    • Jakubgt
    • 7 years ago

    Great OS, great performance tweaks, and looks visually stunning. Windows 8 would be a true successor to Windows 7 if they included the start menu. Separate the OS for a tablet edition and one for desktops and you’ll have a successful product in the end.

      • tay
      • 7 years ago

      So…. not so great then?

        • indeego
        • 7 years ago

        Shell apparently sucks. Everything else under the hood is fine.

      • moog
      • 7 years ago

      I think it’s great. Complaints about the Start menu hot corners is overblown.

        • BIF
        • 7 years ago

        This is an unfair characterization.

        It is NOT overblown for people to say if something just doesn’t work for them. Not everybody likes driving a car with a manual transmission. I imagine that there’s a percentage of people couldn’t learn it if they tried. It would be unfair to just write them off by saying that their complaint is overblown.

        Windows without a start menu DOES suck, for me anyway. I’ve been using “menus” in some form or fashion for much of my adult life, so that works for me. I would not be able to cope with it Windows 8 sans menus, but luckily for me there are alternative options available.

    • glynor
    • 7 years ago

    I’m a little confused…

    Are these OEM licenses the System Builder licenses, or something else? I want to grab at least one System Builder Pro license, to throw on a VM until I decide what to do with it (if anything).

    Also, I’m pretty darn sure that there are no boxed retail copies of Windows 8, just upgrade and System Builder: [url<]http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-33642_7-57471786-292/windows-8-the-end-of-the-full-retail-version/[/url<] The System Builder license is, by far, the best option for people like us (the DIY crowd). It is licensed for personal use (so you no longer have to "sell it to yourself" to be legit), and [url=http://www.zdnet.com/how-the-new-windows-8-license-terms-affect-you_p2-7000003028/<]you are allowed to transfer the license[/url<] to new motherboards, and from VM to physical or the reverse, for personal use. [quote<]You may transfer the software to another computer that belongs to you. … You may not transfer the software to share licenses between computers. In other words, you can remove the Windows 8 upgrade from an original PC and then install it on another PC, assuming the new PC has a license that qualifies it for an upgrade. Likewise, you can completely remove the PUL System Builder software from a self-built PC, a VM, or a partition and then install it in a new physical or virtual PC.[/quote<]

      • glynor
      • 7 years ago

      To be clear, you can also transfer the upgrade license, if the machine you’re transferring to is licensed for Win XP-7 beforehand (but that doesn’t apply to new builds). However, more importantly, they closed the Clean Install with Upgrade Media loophole.

      The upgrade install will not proceed (based on your license key) without having been launched from an existing, working, copy of Windows. Therefore, if you buy one of these cheap upgrade licenses, and you want to clean install later, you’re going to have to install Windows 7 FIRST, and then immediately “upgrade” it to Windows 8. When you do this, you can have the Windows 8 install wipe the disk first, but it won’t work if the disk is already blank. It has to have been launched from within Windows.

      Much different from Windows 7, and much more annoying.

        • BIF
        • 7 years ago

        Although I can file two discs or install ISOs away just as easily as I can one disc, the upgrade process can be a real hassle. I’ve decided that sometimes it just might be worth it to buy a full license, especially for a machine that I’ve built and will continue to rebuild in the years to come.

        The question that Microsoft hasn’t answered for me is whether or not you can perform the install/upgrade process on a new computer down the road.

        I have several full licenses for XP and one upgrade license for Vista; some are currently installed, others are currently unused. I’m not really in need of either OS at this time, but I’d like to preserve the use of those licenses for upgrades, even if it’s just a one-time use.

        The laptop seems like it might be the one with the most potential for being troublesome. It’s a one year old Asus G73. I’m concerned that I could do the $40 upgrade now and then later (in a few years maybe) I might want to do a fresh install (for a new hard drive or SSD, or before selling or gifting it, for example). Would the fresh install even work? Or would I have to fresh-install Windows 7 and then “re-upgrade” Windows 8 on top of that?

        I don’t know, and Microsoft hasn’t been helpful on that. Nor do I know if the “re-upgrade” would even work. It’s possible that re-upgrading to Windows 8 on the same machine would end up failing a hash code or something, and MS could tell you that your “one-time upgrade” has already been used, or maybe your hardware license keys don’t match, and now you’ll need to visit the Microsoft Store to purchase a new full license for Windows 8.

        THAT is what would be annoying.

    • ludi
    • 7 years ago

    Carp as we may about Win8’s “features,” at least this represents progress on the pricing front. I remember when OEM CDs of Win9x cost around $35 in the late 1990s, which is about $45-50 in adjusted terms.

    • elmopuddy
    • 7 years ago

    I’d tried to use it a few times, set up a dual boot.. it has issues connecting to my 2008R2 server, tried a few “fixes” but I lose patience pretty quick.

    • oldDummy
    • 7 years ago

    Have been using it for awhile and find it OK.
    Windows 8 is Windows 7 with a Metro wrapper.
    I’m in the process of downgrading out of a Droid X, so metro does nothing for me.
    While I understand the marketing aspect of it; it’s still annoying.
    Maybe if I ever use a tablet….well, maybe.

    • danny e.
    • 7 years ago

    Windows 8 has an option to “pre-order”? Windows 8 is something that should have the “post-order” option. .. which means “let me know when Windows 9 ships with the fixes to your horrible decisions and then I’ll send you my order for that.”

      • Sahrin
      • 7 years ago

      >Windows 8 has an option to “pre-order”? Windows 8 is something that should have the “post-order” option. .. which means “let me know when Windows 9 ships with the fixes to your horrible decisions and then I’ll send you my order for that.”

      They should also include a “FUD Filter” for those of us with the mental fortitude to handle change so that we don’t have to put up with this nonsense bullshit for the next three years.

        • BIF
        • 7 years ago

        I like your concept of the “post-order” option!

        • Malphas
        • 7 years ago

        Exactly. I’m so bored of the tiresome anti-Windows 8 BS shoehorned into every article relating to it in some way by kids that have grown up post Windows 95 and never seen a significant change in GUI’s before like the rest of us have (moving from text based to graphical bases interfaces, Windows 3.1 and earlier to Start Menu, etc.).

    • Omniman
    • 7 years ago

    I already have the upgrade coming for my laptop for the 15 bucks or what not. I’m contemplating getting it for my main desktop as I seem to have misplaced my windows 7 key to rebuild it 🙁

      • tviceman
      • 7 years ago

      You can easily identify the key you are currently using via downloadable programs. Google is your friend.

        • Omniman
        • 7 years ago

        I’ve tried a few previously but they always seem to fail to give the correct key 🙁

          • Scrotos
          • 7 years ago

          Magic Jelly Bean!

            • BIF
            • 7 years ago

            I don’t know what that means.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This