Release roundup: Big cases, big drives, and ambidextrous mice

In our look at this week’s miscellaneous product launches, we have fresh fodder from Cooler Master, Lian Li, and Western Digital:

  • Cooler Master intros Storm Recon mouse. Gaming mice are a dime a dozen these days, but not all of them are suitable for southpaws. Cooler Master’s latest rodent has an ambidextrous design that still has a wealth of gamer-friendly features, including an Avago 3090 sensor with sensitivity of up to 4000 DPI, 32KB of onboard memory for storing profiles and macros, customizable wheel backlighting colors, and support for on-the-fly adjustment of not just the DPI level, but also the USB polling rate and the mouse’s liftoff distance. The Cooler Master Storm should be available this month for $39.99.

  • Lian Li unleashes the PC-D8000. This monster of an enclosure looks more like a house than a PC case. At 15.9" x 24.7" x 22.5", it’s got room for a whopping 20 3.5" hard drives and two ATX power supplies, and its five 5.25" optical drive bays can be repurposed to accommodate another 10 2.5" hard drives or SSDs. The PC-D8000 has room for jumbo-sized HPTX motherboards, too, and you can cool the whole shebang with up to six 140-mm fans at the front and four fans (including one 120-mm spinner and three 140-mm models) at the back. This gargantuan contraption has an equally intimidating price tag: $349.

  • WD offers highest capacity My Book to date with 8 TB . How does paying $849.99 for eight gigs of storage sound? Pretty good? Then you’ll love the new My Book Thunderbolt Duo, which Western Digital touts as its highest-capacity My Book offering to date. The drive features dual Thunderbolt ports and, mercifully, comes with a Thunderbolt cable in the box. WD says you can daisy chain up to six of these babies for a total storage capacity of 48TB. If that all sounds too rich for your blood, then WD has also introduced the My Book 4TB at $249.99. That offering has a lowly USB 3.0 connection, which should still be more than fast enough for mechanical storage. Look for both of these drives at "select U.S. retailers" as well as at WD’s own online store.

I’m not crazy about colored backlighting on mice, but that Cooler Master Storm Recon looks pretty neat. I get occasional tingling in my right fingers and forearm after long Excel data entry sessions; having the freedom to switch mousing hands easily would be quite, er, handy.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    I may be especially negative on a Monday morning, but [b<]who cares[/b<] about big cases? Anyone can do big cases. The market is flooded with a variety of big, ugly, plain and garish cases from every manufacturer under the sun and they're all dinosaurs. MicroATX and MiniITX are where people are headed, if they're not already there. The entire goddamn industry is going smaller, lighter, more portable and what do we get? The imaginatively-named, 8800 cubic-inch, 26-bay PC-D8000 and its vast, overpriced expanses of featureless aluminium.

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      With such a simple design, I am sure that it cost almost nothing in R&D and manufacturing, so selling even a few will boost revenue and turn a profit. And it’s east pickings for excess-enthusiasts.

    • internetsandman
    • 7 years ago

    If you’re gonna need that much storage, why not go with a couple Fractal Arrays or Nodes stacked on top of each other and all hooked into a central server? Wouldn’t that be much cheaper, or at least not take up as much space? For an incredibly high powered workstation I can somewhat see the need for an HTPX board hooked up to 20 drives, but for a server? Idk it just doesn’t make sense when you look at rack mounts/ITX storage cases

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      Your proposal isn’t even being close to being cheaper. You would need 4 Fractals to equal just one of the PC-D8000’s, not to mention 4 MB’s, 4 CPU’s, 4 power supplies, 4 sets of ram….

    • Metonymy
    • 7 years ago

    I have a few WD dual drives (including the new ones with Thunderbolt with big drives and a Thunderbolt with Velociraptors), and while they are fast enough, they scream cheap, and get hot enough that there’s software for OS X that monitors and shuts them down.

    Granted, they’re cheaper than the LaCie equivalents, but I don’t trust them. (And wouldn’t have paid for them either.)

    • Sam125
    • 7 years ago

    Why would anyone ever need something like the PC-D8000? Slap a motor on it, have it patrol around the house and you’d have one intimidating PC. I know I’d be pretty scared if I saw one of those things slowly rolling toward me.

      • Metonymy
      • 7 years ago

      sooooooo… you do or do not think that they’ll sell based on their looks?

      • albundy
      • 7 years ago

      its not even that…i dont think it is practical to tell you the truth. you might as well set up a rack mount instead of this. looks like once its filled up, it will weigh more than an average person!

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      *raises hand*

      Right now I’m running e-sata enclosures because even a behemoth like the Cosmos II ran out of bays for hard drives.

        • albundy
        • 7 years ago

        if you run that many drives internally, your gonna need another PSU to be able to handle all of them, especially if you’ve got a medium to high end graphics card. keeping them external alleviates the power problem but creates another one since esata cannot be daisy chained. luckily thunderbolt can.

          • Deanjo
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<]if you run that many drives internally, your gonna need another PSU to be able to handle all of them[/quote<] Not all that big, 20 drives can easily be handled by a 550 with room to spare. [quote<]especially if you've got a medium to high end graphics card[/quote<] No need for a graphics card on a server [quote<]creates another one since esata cannot be daisy chained. [/quote<] eSATA/SATA, depending on the chipset used, can support port multipliers which allows you to hook up to 15 drives per port.

        • Theolendras
        • 7 years ago

        With that many drive you’re seeking troughput or storage capacity ? Seems like SSD reduce the need for that many drives, unless you need capacity. Still maxing out 13 drive case for personal use seems like a lot. Heck these days you can get up to 42 To with a case like Comos II with 3 To drives. Not that I can’t see any use, but I’m curious how you manage to need that much.

          • Deanjo
          • 7 years ago

          All media storage with 2 and 3 TiB’s. The only SSD is mini pci-e for boot.

      • rrr
      • 7 years ago

      I’m going to use it with my i3-2100 and integrated graphics. I need plenty of cooling for this power hungry setup.

    • mocliamtoh
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]How does paying $849.99 for [b<]eight gigs[/b<] of storage sound? Pretty good?[/quote<] Sign me up! You can't find higher prices even for Intel SSDs!

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      lol, obviously a typo but it still isn’t all that great of a buy. The local BB had Hitachi 7k3000 3TB drives on for $119. Just picked up 4 of them tonight.

        • Farting Bob
        • 7 years ago

        Thats a pretty good deal, 4TB drives havent really made much noise yet. 3TB have been out ages, and 4TB are still some way off from reaching a good price/TB ratio. Unless you need 4TB and only have space for 1 HDD then it just doesnt make much sense for consumers right now.

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