Ivy-based Celerons coming next year

Since its introduction this spring, Ivy Bridge has slowly trickled down Intel’s desktop processor lineup. It infiltrated the low-end Core i3 and Pentium families last month, and now, CPU World reports that the chip is poised to power a handful of new Celerons. Three Ivy-based Celerons are purportedly coming early next year: the Celeron G1610T, G1610, G1620.

Like existing Celerons, the new models are supposedly set to sport dual cores. They won’t feature Hyper-Threading or Turbo support, and their L3 caches will be limited to 2MB. According to CPU-World, the G1610 will be clocked at 2.6GHz, while the G1620 will run 100MHz faster. Both chips will apparently have 55W TDPs, 10W lower than Sandy-based Celerons with the same clock speeds. The Celeron G1610T will reportedly have the same 35W thermal envelope as Intel’s existing low-power Celeron, the G550T, but the newcomer’s 2.3GHz clock speed will be a smidgen higher.

All the Ivy-based Celerons will be designed to work with DDR3-1333 memory, a bump up from the 1066MHz RAM support of the Sandy-derived chips. That upgrade should help the performance of the integrated GPU, which shares memory bandwidth with the CPU cores. However, it doesn’t match the DDR3-1600 support of the Pentium G2120.

As we saw in our desktop Trinity review, the G2120 is quite a bit slower than its Ivy-based Core i3 siblings. If the incoming Celerons have lower core and memory speeds plus less cache (the Pentium has 3MB of L3), it’s hard to be optimistic about their performance. Of course, the Celerons will likely cost around $50 or less—about half the going rate for the Pentium G2120. AMD’s cheapest desktop Trinity APU, the A4-5300, offers dual cores at 3.4-3.6GHz for just $65 right now.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    As a consumer and PC enthusiast, I just don’t find uber-low end processors appealing at all, nor are they logical choices. If I were buying a complete PC, the difference between cheap processors such as Celerons and say, an I3, is only about $30-$50. A complete i3 PC will probably cost you just a little bit more than a Celeron PC but should offer much better performance, even if all the other parts are identical. This is not only true for low end PCs, but PCs up the ladder as well. Take the FX-4100 vs. Core i5-3470. The i5 will obviously run circles around the FX, but if you compare two identical systems based on these two chips, you won’t spend that much more on the i5 than you would on the FX. I guess this is one more reason why AMD really finds it difficult to sell their chips: The CPU is just one component in a long list of components, and whose price is just a fraction of the entire system. Bottomline: unless every penny counts, the Celerons aren’t really compelling. Sure, you can say that you will just run Word, but spending a few bucks more on a faster chip will likely let you use your PC a bit longer than if you scrooged out and got a Celery.

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    So a Pentium is an i3 without HT, and a Celeron is a Pentium with only 2MB of L2 cache?

    I would like at some point, somewhere, to see benchmarks of an i3, Pentium and Celeron. I suspect it won’t happen from any reputable sites since Pentiums and Celerons are about as glamourous and exciting as a bucket of chicken wings.

      • willmore
      • 7 years ago

      Uncooked chicken wings at that. But, I’d like to see that review as well. Some SB and IVB i3/Pentium/Celerons in a cagematch fight to the death!

    • Farting Bob
    • 7 years ago

    The only reason im interested in these celerons is the potential for low power for my HTPC/fileserver. Currently sporting an e-350 setup though, so im in no need for an upgrade there as it does what it needs in a reasonably low power envelope. But buying new, i’d probably combine the slowest celeron with a basic mATX board.

      • ZGradt
      • 7 years ago

      I’d choose a Trinity A6. Cheap, with hardware encryption. TDP is a little high, but they barely use any at idle, which is where my fileserver stays at most of the time. I’m fighting the urge to upgrade my E350.

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      They are great appliance cpu’s too. We use them for pfsense boxes since there is a decent selection of 1155 motherboards with good dual intel NICs on them and not some cheap crappy realtek NICs which seem to populate virtually every AMD board (and dual nics are rarely seen on those boards).

        • Bauxite
        • 7 years ago

        Just make sure those boards aren’t over $30 more than a super cheap amd board.

        Dual port intel server grade nics are $30 all day every day on fleabay. Sometimes you can get lucky and find a good quad under $100 too.

        I like intel chipset boards in general, but for dual intel lan I don’t see many cheap ones. My current “goto” boards, DQ77MK or KB, are ~$140 and great but those cheap FM2 A55 boards are down near $50 already.

        (also often the second nic is 82579LM for iKVM, this chipset has been out for awhile but still not supported very well by *BSD or ESXi)

          • Deanjo
          • 7 years ago

          I can grab DQ77MK’s for $100, and the 82579LM is actually well supported in the latest versions of BSD and ESXi. Zero issues with them at all running pfsense 2.0 and ESXi 5.1.

            • Bauxite
            • 7 years ago

            Sorry but that makes 3 cases of either very liberal stretching of the truth or just plain old BS, have to call you out on it.

            $100: Nope

            ESXi 5.1: [i<]still[/i<] does not have a driver from vmware, sure you can hack in the standard linux one but have fun explaining that in a real work scenario: [url<]http://www.vmware.com/resources/compatibility/search.php?deviceCategory=io[/url<] 82574L = yes 82579LM = no Current stable pfsense 2.0.1 (aka for production boxes) = FreeBSD 8.1 82579LM support = 8.2, meaning build your own [i<]beta[/i<] 2.1 from the nightly snapshot. This nic is probably the most common one people have asked about on their forums in the past year, other than the usual realtek questions by people that don't know any better.

    • vargis14
    • 7 years ago

    The current sandy celerons have a bit of pep in them. Paired with a low power discrete gpu they make fantastic HTPCs. Considering if you buy a decent motherboard and at the time of purchase you cannot afford the gaming CPU you really want for 50$ it is a helluva good CPU to use until you can swing a i5 or i7 1155 CPU.

    If yout making a HTPC just for watching tv/videos The high end Trinitys are looking pretty good but with the a10 5800k costing 120-130$ with a 100watt tdp. I would rather spend 145$ or so for a 1155 chip you can upgrade along with a hd7750. Down the road a i5 or i7 1155 CPU will mop the floor with trinity and give you some real power to convert videos, gaming or whatever u need lotsa CPU power for.

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      Weird argument 100w is to much but you suggest an i3-3220 + hd7750 that got an even higher TDP and higher iddle consumption.

      And do you realize you doubled the price of the component and increase fan noise ?
      The main issue is that you are comparing a $125 APU to a $220 CPU/GPU solution.

      This is what I’m looking for in an HTPC. I dont care if its 55w or 100w under load.
      [url<]http://www.fanlesstech.com/2012/10/amd-celebrates-trinity-in-silence.html[/url<] So what I want is low idle power & enough GPU power to do Console level gaming. Intel cant provide this at any price. You need a discreet GPU and your power and noise go up. And down the road socket 1155 is being phase out, while FM2 is still on AMD roadmap 3 years from now. So most likely people will be able to get 28nm steamroller + next gen GPU (assuming AMD is alive) Isn't LGA1150 replacing lga 1155 as early as next year ? So good luck on your upgrade path.

        • faramir
        • 7 years ago

        That is correct – there will be no upgrade path (apart from moving up the Ivy Bridge ladder). What vargis14 posted makes absolutely no sense.

      • Waco
      • 7 years ago

      The only HUGE drawback to the current Celerons and Pentiums based off of SB is that they CAN’T USE SMART RESPONSE.

      I understand market segmentation but come on…SRT is one of the best reasons to go Intel over AMD at low price points and they’ve effectively murdered that segment with this restriction.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        Huh, I didn’t know that SRT was disabled on these chips, I thought that was all chipset-based. Thanks!

          • Waco
          • 7 years ago

          I didn’t either till I tried to use a G530 in my HTPC with SRT. Only i3, i5, and i7 chips are supported.

          It’s so convoluted even the Intel reps I talked to (3 of them on the phone) couldn’t figure out what was wrong. Every one of them said if I had a Z68 chipset I’d be able to use SRT. It took 45 minutes on the phone for them to figure out that you can’t use anything branded less than an i3 after telling me to update my BIOS 15 times. That was after telling them it worked fine if I swapped in my 2600K. They were convinced it was a motherboard problem…

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            Why would you use SRT on a HTPC? Use the SSD for boot and the platters for media since SRT is not going to benefit the loading of media.

    • sschaem
    • 7 years ago

    So, does this set the bar for AMD for the next 6 month in that market? thats not very high.

    I know not everyone read benchmark result the same, but from I can tell AMD dominate the sub $140 APU market with Trinity. So not much will change for the next 6 month unless Intel does a price drop.

    • jdaven
    • 7 years ago

    IB = longest rollout ever

      • link626
      • 7 years ago

      slow economy, dying pc sales + no AMD competition = intel is gonna drag this one out.

      they probably have excess inventory of IB, plus a crapload of leftover sandy bridge i3’s.

      you notice how stores are still selling core i3 SB laptops ?

        • pedro
        • 7 years ago

        Apple are still reppin’ SB iMacs. It’s been 553 days since they updated those.

      • travbrad
      • 7 years ago

      They are trying to beat Nvidia (Kepler) for longest roll-out ever.

    • csroc
    • 7 years ago

    Whoa the better one is a whole 100MHz faster! Daaaayyuuuummmmmm!!!

    • Shambles
    • 7 years ago

    Who on earth is buying Celerons still over the Pentiums that are still released?

      • UberGerbil
      • 7 years ago

      OEMs and whitebox builders, especially in “secondary” markets (or whatever they’re calling the non-US/Europe/Japan majority of the world these days).

        • Shambles
        • 7 years ago

        Good point. Sometimes I forget that I’m not the centre of the universe.

      • rrr
      • 7 years ago

      Those who can’t afford Pentiums?

    • Crayon Shin Chan
    • 7 years ago

    If they keep this up, they’ll run out of things to disable and wind up disabling execution ports or out of order execution. Just to make it clear that you get only what you pay for.

      • Bauxite
      • 7 years ago

      Once they get there, can wear a hooded robe and sneer at us from the throne:

      “Now witness the firepower of this fully armed and operational [s<]death star[/s<] monopoly!" For OOO, they already have atom for wasted space on wafers or whatever. ("enjoy your table scraps")

        • trackerben
        • 7 years ago

        Hehe, that was a little harsh.

      • UberGerbil
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]wind up disabling execution ports or out of order execution[/quote<]They've already done that: it's called Atom.

      • trackerben
      • 7 years ago

      Or they could just launch minimalized micro-ITX boards with the Celeron and 4GB of DDR3 soldered on and with an included sticker for a download license for Windows 7 Starter. Then Intel can market it as, say, the BookPC as in the 1990s concept.

        • LocalCitizen
        • 7 years ago

        i won’t mind something like this. better than atoms, for sure.

      • LocalCitizen
      • 7 years ago

      maybe they’ll disable a mem channel… not giving them any ideas…

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      Only if they feel the need to move even further downmarket, which I don’t see happening for socketed CPUs. The important thing isn’t absolute performance, it’s relative performance, and features, to the rest of the lineup.

    • flip-mode
    • 7 years ago

    The ‘brace yourselves’ meme is totally appropo for this announcement.

      • Bauxite
      • 7 years ago

      ignore, reply fail

      • flip-mode
      • 7 years ago

      why not: [url<]http://www.quickmeme.com/meme/3rcod3/[/url<]

        • Arclight
        • 7 years ago

        Browsing the memes there i found this one:
        [url<]http://www.quickmeme.com/meme/3r8zlc/[/url<] My reaction was :O ..................O M G!

    • Voldenuit
    • 7 years ago

    It always amazes me how much performance intel can trim off to produce these Celerons.

      • bittermann
      • 7 years ago

      Maybe they are just trying to match Bulldozer performance. 😐

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 7 years ago

        They’d better get out the big shears if they plan on that much trimming.

          • Duck
          • 7 years ago

          You guys are so mean! lol

    • MadManOriginal
    • 7 years ago

    Intel is pretty gangsta, with the slow rolling out of these chips.

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      Kinda like watching [s<]grass[/s<] ivy grow, isn't it?

        • Bauxite
        • 7 years ago

        Ivy grows helluva faster than grass, just ask any groundskeeper.

          • dmjifn
          • 7 years ago

          Not for me: Spidermites!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This