AMD posts Q3 loss, announces 15% layoffs

AMD’s third-quarter financial results are in, and they’ve arrived with a side order of pink slips. The firm recorded a net loss of $157 million on revenue of $1.27 billion. Those numbers are both worse than the previous quarter and worse than Q3 a year ago. AMD’s saw revenue decline for both its Computing Solutions and Graphics divisions. Interestingly, though, the average selling price was down for CPUs but up for graphics processors.

Overall, AMD’s gross margin was just 31%, a steep decline from the 45% it enjoyed both last quarter and in Q3 a year ago. The company identified a $100 million inventory write-down, made up of mostly Llano-based A-Series APUs, as a contributing factor for the drop. It also cited weaker demand for its microprocessors as a culprit.

In the coming quarter, AMD intends to axe 15% of its work force in a bid to lower costs. The firm projects the cuts will lead to $20 million in savings for Q4 and $190 million in 2013 as a whole, the company says. However, AMD also expects to incur a restructuring cost of around $80 million.

The official press release doesn’t reveal specifics about the restructuring plan or whether engineering positions will be disproportionally affected, as rumored last week. Here’s what CEO Rory Read had to say:

It is clear that the trends we knew would re-shape the industry are happening at a much faster pace than we anticipated. As a result, we must accelerate our strategic initiatives to position AMD to take advantage of these shifts and put in place a lower cost business model. Our restructuring efforts are designed to simplify our product development cycles, reduce our breakeven point and enable us to fund differentiated product roadmaps and strategic breakaway opportunities.

Intel seems to be doing a better job of following those trends—and of enduring the weak overall economic environment. The chip giant announced largely flat Q3 results a couple of days ago, but it still reported $3 billion in profit off revenue of $13.5 billion—with a gross margin over 63%.

Comments closed
    • beck2448
    • 7 years ago

    Nvidia had the same revenue but 200+ million in profit WITHOUT a real cpu division.

    • moose17145
    • 7 years ago

    how the hell are they losing money in their GPU business?!? Regardless of what the rabid NVidia fanboys claim… the 7xxx series of videocards is a solid win this round. They all came out 6 months before any of their competing NVidia counterparts, perform easily on par with NVidia, and have some nice features that NVidia still doesn’t have. This entire GPU cycle NVidia has been the ones playing catch up…

    Unless their GPU divisions revenue only went down but was otherwise still in the black. But even then… that still brings me back to my previous points. How badly do you have to screw up to lose ground like that despite having a 6+ month lead on your competitor at every price point? Even when NVidia finally did come out with their competing 6xx series products, were only on par with what AMD had, or only just a tad bit faster, but still underwhelming considering how late to market they were. AMD’s GPUs have better compute capabilities than kepler, and by no small margin, while implementing some additional technologies that are very good at keeping power consumption in check. Honestly, anyone who says AMD fumbled this round with the 7xxx series (technologically and performance wise) is either a fanboy or doesn’t know what they are talking about. And yet despite being VERY competitive in that arena still somehow screwed the pooch… it seriously just baffles me…

    Despite what people claim… I honestly think ATI would still be around, and would very likely be doing quite well right now had AMD never bought them out. But it appears that AMD wants to not only sink itself to the bottom of the ocean… but wants to drag ATI with it in the process…

      • OU812
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]how the hell are they losing money in their GPU business?!? Regardless of what the rabid NVidia fanboys claim... the 7xxx series of videocards is a solid win this round.[/quote<] Your rose color glasses need to be removed that way you could objectively see why AMD loses or makes very little money in the GPU division quarter after quarter.

      • Homeles
      • 7 years ago

      AMD had an operating income of $18 million for their GPU division.

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    Ok, now what? With AMD almost dead and Intel holding AMD by the throat ready to spill AMD’s blood, what’s gonna happen? I know AMD hasn’t been the finest and best-executing company out there, but they did what they could with what they have. They’ve gone where no other Intel competitor has ever even dreamed of going. And yet, people voted with their wallets, thinking only of the short term, which is getting a flashy Core i5 or i7, instead of trying to realize what such a choice could entail in the long run. I expect to get a billion downvotes for this post, but I’ll be the person who laughs last when all of us pays a grand for our next processor.

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      Already happening.
      Its been sooo long but I recall paying $240 for my retail Q6600 (was $800 just month earlier).
      I have been looking at the past year for the i7-3930k… $560 then, $560 now.

      So my only chance is to wait a while for them to show up on ebay.

      The market of high perform CPU competition is officially long DEAD. its a fact.
      ARM is not going to change that, at least not a chance in the next 5 to 7 year.

      So Intel is the king of hill by K.O

      For the bottom feeders.. the atom, celeron, pentium.. ARM is coming in ‘fast’.
      And Microsoft is making sure AMD dies a quick death with Windows RT, opening the city gates for an ARM invasion on the windows platform.

      By 2014 I expect the landscape to switch toward a mix of Atom/ARM SoC in netbook / tablets , ultra portables and utilitarian office PCs. AMD market share wont be able to provide for R&D expenses to keep their SoC competitive.

      AMD seem to realize that. Thats why they are switching their business away from the x86 IP.
      Its not quite official, but their new direction is clear… AMD might live on as a GPU IP block provider for SoC design. But here they are facing nVidia, Qualcomm, ARM, imagination, etc…

      I gut feeling tells me AMD will be split into many small companies and pieces.
      A bit like what happen already with their SoC design division and their Digital media chip design.
      Cray might inherit their Opteron team, etc..
      And what is left is seamicro making ARM and Atom based servers.

      Now, if AMD was on overdrive and was able to release steamroller in Q1 things might be different. But AMD roadmap is just too, too slow.

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 7 years ago

    AMD: The new VIA?

      • Meadows
      • 7 years ago

      That’s encouraging, considering VIA didn’t die.

      Not completely, at least.

      Not yet.

      I guess.

        • sschaem
        • 7 years ago

        What is the last VIA product you purchased ?

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          Hmm… that was a chipset in an AMD mobo a looooong time ago

          • FuturePastNow
          • 7 years ago

          Hmm. A USB 3.0 card with a VLI chip.

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    It’s really sad to see AMD sink deeper and deeper. Perhaps I should go out now and buy an FX chip while I still can, as a final salute to this once great company. Maybe I can put the tin box, unopened, in a glass case, for all to see and admire. It is the World’s First 8-core Desktop Processor and it is from AMD, Intel’s biggest thorn in its side at the height of the x86 CPU race.

      • jihadjoe
      • 7 years ago

      An original Athlon 64 FX will probably be a better homage. Google shopping still turns up a few stores that are selling them new.

    • RtFusion
    • 7 years ago

    Wait, this is the SAME AMD who brought us Clawhammer and Sledgehammer? The guys who actually had Intel shaking when FX-51 and FX-53 came out? Same guys who brought in the integrated memory controller, HyperTransport, and x86-64 to market? The same guys who were commanding a good chunk of the server market? The same guys who brought us godly CPUs that overclocked like mad on air?

    WTF just happened here?

    Man, AMD has been around for a long time, long before I was born. They’ve been selling great CPUs for a time but things from my POV just began to slip around 2006-2007, we all know what happened there.

    Then rumours of Bulldozer were flying around and I personally thought that this would be the first step for AMD to bring itself out its own mess and climb back up. Well, we also know how that went down.

    Missed roadmap targets, financial targets, talent leaving in droves, and an EXTREMELY incompetent management. The ENTIRE BoD should be hanged for all I bloody care.

    I tried to ignore posts and comments saying that AMD is done because of the continuous f*ck-ups but I guess this is really the beginning now. I really hoped that AMD would get better. We saw some glimmers of hope that it would be. But this is just devastating news. Hell, even f*cking Read needs some other 3rd party to help him steer a sinking ship that is on course for an iceburg. You are no CEO when you can’t do your f*cking job. Even more sad that said sh*t management will walk away with gold in their pockets while witnessing the slow death of a company they helped to destroy.

    *sigh*

    Its like watching two cars crashing into each other at 100,000 FPS. You want to do something, but you can’t. You just can’t do anything but wait for the inevitable.

    It angers and saddens me to see this little giant just go like that. God knows what the founders think of this situation.

    My bet is AMD will no longer be in 5 years time. No one will buy it as it has permanently ruined its value and image. Probably end up like Nortel with pieces (patents and the like) of itself being sold off, then the rest dumped on a garbage heap.

    As another commenter has mentioned, Via and Matrox will have a new buddy to talk to in a corner table at the end of the cafeteria during lunch time.

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      Last time I remember feeling like this was during the time Commodore slowly killed the Amiga.
      It was painful to watch, and with AMD it feels like sabotage from the inside.

      I also have a long history with ATI products , I remember going to ati.com for driver and be greeted by plastic dog poop.
      I just hope the Red team get re-incarnated at Microsoft, I hope MS want to keep the windows gaming platform alive. Would be kind if lame if your only IHV is nvidia.

      Anyways. I dont care so much about AMD CPU business, but I just hope for ATI lives on one way or another.
      I’m saying this about the AMD because I think ARM will pickup where AMD left off and keep Intel churning along.
      As we just saw, Intel just accelerated product release. No thank to AMD on this.
      So its all good for CPU consumers in the long term.

      • ronch
      • 7 years ago

      That’s what happens when you (AMD) shoot yourself in the foot, again and again and again.

    • link626
    • 7 years ago

    amd should not have preannounced their earnings.

    since they did, stock price has dropped 33% to $2.20

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      I think it might have been worse if they gave us a one time surprise.

      AMD is priced at 1.5 billion because no one believe they will survive the next 12 month.
      Thats why Analyst are pricing AMD in their latest report BELOW book value.

      We just saw their CFO bailing out. He doesn’t want the stigma to be at the helm of TWO failing company going bankrupt back to back, its not fun work to be a CFO when a company is in bankruptcy proceedings.

      So what will AMD be worth when all its top talent are finally working for Samsung and Apple?
      What is AMD APU/CPU business worth when it cant make any profit and is falling behind at each release?

    • maxxcool
    • 7 years ago

    This is why management should leave geeks to do geeks work. Did Intel mgmt interfere with Banais? the ancestor to Core and the current cpu line ?

    nope… they gave the Israelis a cpu core from the **90’s**, a pentium 3, which itself was based on a pentium pro 200/233…. and let them play with it and made one of the “currently” best cpus for the consumer to date.

    Amd management is purely to blame, not the talent… oh wait… the talent left this quarter….

      • Perezoso
      • 7 years ago

      You don’t want to go there! Terms like “Pentium 4”, “Itanic” or “Rambus” should ring a bell… Intel survived its collosal mistakes because it was and it is much bigger. That’s it.

        • data8504
        • 7 years ago

        I don’t think you know what you’re talking about, frankly. To claim that the three products you mention don’t contribute to your current expectation of performance is a little silly.

        For example, Pentium 4 development yielded things such as Hyper Threading (SMT), Advanced SIMD (SSE3, etc.), and more uarch advancements than I can cite (prefetch algos, speculative execution, enhanced snooping, cache acceleration, etc.)

        Itanium gave you UEFI. It also was one of the first widely parallelizable ISAs.

        Rambus, specifically RDRAM because I know that’s what you’re referring to, and the MCH technology we developed back there is still in use today in server-class memory buffers (think next-gen FBDIMM).

        For the number of technology tentacles Intel sends out, you’d expect some would not be a market success. However to think that all that research is for nought is a little shortsighted. My 2¢.

          • clone
          • 7 years ago

          whoa, hang on, leave baggage at the door please.

          the reality is Pentium 4 lost Intel market share (AKA lost them money, hurt their reputation).

          all of the tech you mention amounts to desperate attempts to fix a bad product, that the tech is now being used elsewhere had nothing to do with the comments made above.

          the same can be said of RDRAM & Rambus’s complete failure, and lastly the same can be said of UEFI which I do not believe for a moment could only have come from Itanium….. that it came from Itanium… meh…. was inevitable.

          to be glib and say “for all of the tentacles Intel sends out for some not to be a success”…. if we were talking about minor tech or incremental feelers I’d agree but were talking about huge blunders that cost Intel significant amounts of market share and reputation.

          note: I’m focusing on P4 & Rambus DRAM & not so much Itanium because while Itanium was a sales disaster it served it’s purpose in discouraging others from entering the marketplace.

            • Waco
            • 7 years ago

            The Pentium 4 was a massive feat of engineering. Sure, it was bested by AMD in short order, but that’s only because AMD stuck with a short efficient pipeline and Intel shot for the moon with a deep pipeline that relied on the prefetcher and brand predictor.

            AMD is now pulling the same thing with BD/PD…deep pipelines and putting its biscuits on the branch predictor and other associated prefetch logic to keep things flowing smoothly. It does fare well in the server world as long as you don’t care about power efficiency too much though…but in terms of (integer) cores per box they’ve got Intel beaten handily.

            • clone
            • 7 years ago

            yep, I know, I think the online community got so used to AMD and Intel being reasonably close that they didn’t expect AMD to abandon desktop so blatantly with Bulldozer.

            I think we can all agree that we certainly saw it coming (the demise of desktop PC)… or to avoid an absolutism we all saw it playing a much smaller role in the future but I personally hadn’t expected to see AMD walk away so quickly……. I was really looking forward to AMD’s Thuban replacement and while some ppl would be silly enough to think AMD didn’t know what they were doing at all, I’m certain they knew what Bulldozer was going to be albeit they likely were betting on the new manufacturing process reducing power consumption more than it did….. it’s the only logical I can figure for going the route they did.

            • Waco
            • 7 years ago

            I don’t think they did it intentionally…there are some serious problems with the fancy mechanics that were meant to keep IPC up on BD. They don’t seem fixed with PD (on mobile anyway) but with the way people are jumping ship I don’t expect them to fix it with the next iteration either…

            • clone
            • 7 years ago

            I’m inclined to disagree, when AMD chose to go with an 8 core cpu as their flagship they were embracing server and that decision would affect every element of the design phase, to go that route their had to have been a decision made early in the process to focus more on multi threading as opposed to single threaded performance.

            BD’s modular design is certainly interesting but with Trinity AMD is proving that additional single threaded perf is elusive and will require re-engineering not tweaking…. a fundamental challenge and not born from a flaw in the architecture.

            • Waco
            • 7 years ago

            I don’t doubt there was some agreed-upon departure from single-threaded performance at the cost of all else…but I don’t think AMD intended the IPC to drop quite so much. Even server apps need individual threads to be quick in the face of branches, memory access, etc.

            • clone
            • 7 years ago

            oh I fully agree with that, Bulldozer was a disappointing chip for AMD all round…. better in server horrible in single threaded.

            definitely things didn’t work out the way they’d hoped.

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      I’m not keeping track, but I think the talent left a long time ago.

      And dude. AMD management did EXACTLY that,
      They gave the Indian division the aging star core while AMD US division built Bulldozer.
      Bulldozer is AMD P4, and Lanno is AMD ‘Core’.

        • eofpi
        • 7 years ago

        Except Trinity is Bulldozer with a few tweaks, not Stars with a few tweaks.

          • sschaem
          • 7 years ago

          Please read the thread to understand what being talked about…

      • clone
      • 7 years ago

      AMD introduced K7 with Gerry Sanders at the helm, he was a non techie, AMD failed when Hector took over, he was an engineer.

      Intel is purely to blame for AMD’s successes and failures.

        • jihadjoe
        • 7 years ago

        AMD wouldn’t even have existed without Intel.

        Remember they started off as a just another manufacturer for Intel chips like the 8088 and the 8086, up until the 386. After that they were reverse-engineering intel’s 486 designs.

        It wasn’t until the K5 that AMD really had their own completely in-house microprocessor, their own internal R&D of course only enabled by profits from making chips based on pure Intel designs.

          • clone
          • 7 years ago

          not so sure about that…. AMD would have found something to do if Intel wasn’t around to kick them in the ass.

          the market for cpu’s didn’t need Intel, Intel just happened to be the one that dominated it.

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    They are fighting the wrong battles really;

    Their budget processors are most competitive on laptops, but because laptops offer far worse performance/dollar, people looking for budget machines normally think ‘desktop’.

    Their APU’s suffer from the IGP improvements over HD3000/4000 being barely enough to compensate for the lower CPU performance, and again – people buying gaming laptops usually have enough money for a discrete GPU paired with a decent Intel CPU. Those uninterested in graphics have no reason to choose an APU in the first place.

    [b<]However, their main issue is complete and utter management incompetence.[/b<] I'm not saying I could do a better job, but it would seem hard to find people who could do a worse job: In the four years since buying ATI for $5.6B there were [b<]no AMD APUs at all[/b<]. In a single year of Intel's tick-tock cycle (roughly the time Llano was delayed for), Intel's IGP performance increased by a factor of [i<]six[/i<]. It more-than-doubled from the tick of X4500HD to Clarkdale's HD Graphics, and it more-than-doubled again for the tock that brought us Sandy Bridge's HD3000. That's right; Five years after acquiring ATI, AMD [u<]finally[/u<] managed to get Llano out onto the market and it was barely double the speed of a 9-month old HD3000? This is a competitor that wasn't even competing back during the acquisition! Along comes Ivy Bridge's HD4000 only six months later and BAM: AMD's five-years-in-the-making, $5.6B investment is already slower than IGP in Intel's mainstream products. [u<][b<]GREAT JOB AMD, YOU MANAGED THAT IMPECCABLY.[/b<][/u<]

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    Another thought: I guess the industry (and the heavens) are just waiting for AMD to close shop and wave the white flag. Hopefully somebody willing to continue the x86 race snaps them up so we don’t end up with Intel the only sheriff in town. I guess there really isn’t much hope, is there? Don’t get me wrong, I want AMD to survive, if only to keep Intel honest, but they’ve been bleeding so badly and their condition seems to be getting worse and worse ever since Core 2 came out. I think it’s time Rory knocked on the doors of companies that could be interested (IBM? MS?) in an acquisition or something. It’s bound to happen, unless Steamroller turns out to be an Intel-killer.

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    Why is it so hard for AMD to become like Intel? Intel has many top-flight engineers, marketers, manufacturing facilities and money. AMD keeps bleeding talent, crazy marketers, no fab, and peanuts in the bank.

    You can borrow money and build fabs to spread your R&D costs across more chips, but hiring talent to fill those cubicles is a bit harder because top-notch engineers are a little harder to come by especially in such a specialized industry. And the more folks they fire, the less compelling and attractive it would be for top talent to go to AMD. They gotta feed their families, after all, and buy their kids iPods and iPads.

    Intel has all the right systems in place: The right managers, top engineers, the most advanced manufacturing facilities (and a lot of it, too), gazillions in the bank… How can AMD ever hope to compete with Intel again? Sure, they’re veering away from x86, but the ARMs race isn’t a walk in the park either, and the players there are also formidable companies with top talent and money.

      • Chrispy_
      • 7 years ago

      This.

      You paint a bleak picture, but the Athlon and AthlonXP turned Intel from a slumbering cash cow into [i<]the[/i<] most aggressive and successfully executing company in the industry. AMD don't stand a chance of making a CPU comeback anytime soon and their [i<]'sinking ship'[/i<] status and frequent layoffs sure as hell aren't going to pursuade the top talent to join them.

        • clone
        • 7 years ago

        Intel isn’t the most aggressive and successfully executing company in the industry.

        Apple went from impending bankruptcy to the largest corporation in the world in 15 years… that’s aggressive, that’s execution, Apple also invented and redefined the way industries work.

        tbc I have no interest in anything Apple but I can understand their successes and they are far greater than Intel’s.

        to the 2nd point I don’t believe AMD is interested in making a CPU comeback, they left with Bulldozer, something “we” haven’t accepted yet.

          • Chrispy_
          • 7 years ago

          Uh oh, Apple is a more successful chip maker than Intel? We’re all boned!

        • ronch
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]You paint a bleak picture[/quote<] It is bleak. I have no other way to put it. That's the reality.

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      And in the SoC market the fab is becoming the great equalizer…
      If you dont have some massive IP advantage, you are going to compete on razor thing margins.

      In the growing SoC market AMD faces all the biggest industry players not just Intel.

      And with Microsoft opening the doors to ARM into the windows world and HP and all into the server world, AMD is being ask to compete with everyone at the same time.

      AMD seem to be in every segment that exist… as a company on the verge of bankrupcy, how can you afford the R&D to fend of Samsung, Qualcomm, Intel, nVidia, etc… in a head to head battle?

        • ronch
        • 7 years ago

        In other words, AMD can run (from x86) but it can’t hide. It can only diversify so much but its coffers will make sure one of AMD’s hands is tied behind its back as it fends off other big Goliaths in the ARM battlefield. Their complacency from 2003-2007 is really taking its toll now.

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      That pretty much sums it up.

      Inertia is a b*tch

    • Halnerd
    • 7 years ago

    Anyone else think Amazon or Microsoft should be in the market to purchase AMD? If Amazon buys the TI OMAP tech and AMD, they might have something cooking.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      what would MS do with amd? make intel a solid android camp?

        • sschaem
        • 7 years ago

        Own the IP that they use in their Console/ living room devices giving them a competitive advantage.

        They also would have a line of gaming card for their windows platform.
        (MS already make mouse and keyboard)
        Maybe enabling people to play xbox title on windows8 device if you have MS GPUs?

        MS would give away the CPU business to cray, or just close it down.

        AMD is now worth 1.5 billion on the open market, for MS thats a fraction of what they spent on their console. Also – the licensing fee they think of paying AMD, thats a nice discount.
        80 million console at ~25…. wait a minute 🙂
        Microsoft would save 500 million over the next 5 year by buying AMD .

      • designerfx
      • 7 years ago

      Wha? AMD is not just a processor company since they acquired ATI. I don’t think TI has any ability to handle ATI’s graphics portion and keep it competitive – which would cede the entire market to Nvidia. No thanks.

      The ironic, but possibly interesting (even if quite unlikely) outcome would be if Nvidia bought AMD.

        • phileasfogg
        • 7 years ago

        Samsung could also be a potential buyer. They could just buy the whole thing – lock, stock and barrel and then divest away the divisions they wouldn’t want to keep. I see that ARM, Qualcomm, TI, Mediatek and Samsung are all members of the HSA (Heterogeneous system architecture) foundation, which was founded with a view to ultimately fuse together the CPU and GPU instruction-sets+ HWresources. Let’s assume that Qualcomm isn’t interested in buying out AMD and that ARM isn’t interested either (for entirely different reasons). That would leave Samsung – and there are many reasons to believe Samsung would covet AMD’s Radeon graphics division. And, AMD owning SeaMicro is an added benefit: SM has stated explicitly that their FreedomFabric architecture could be used with any CPU, any instruction set. We can be sure SM is working on, or will very soon be working on an ARM-SoC based server design — if so, whose SoC would that be? Calxeda? NVidia? Samsung? Applied Micro? (APM was first to announce a 64bit ARM CPU, called the X-Gene).

        The consulting group from BCG that AMD has supposedly hired to extricate itself from this mess will have its hands full – that much is for sure.

        Then again, it was the brain trust at Morgan Stanley (such as it was) that advised AMD to buy ATI and even loaned it $5B to fund the purchase many years ago. We know how that turned out for AMD shareholders, don’t we?

        • sschaem
        • 7 years ago

        nvidia would be at the bottom of my list.

        Here is my list of companies that can best leverage ATI assets.

        – Exclusive access to top GPU technology for SoC

        Apple
        Samsung
        Qualcomm

        At AMD current marketcap all can afford to buy AMD as a whole and just close AMD money loosing CPU business. Or maybe sell it for a few millions to Cray, or just spin off seamicro as ‘new’ AMD.

        I think the situation is that bad that if AMD continue on its going to loose more money in the coming month to the point where its insolvent. At this point, those company are going to pickup the pieces in some bankruptcy proceedings.

        And if AMD need to do another round of layoff it might be 20% next time,
        each time this kill the company just a little more.

          • phileasfogg
          • 7 years ago

          I really hope that this round of ~1800 layoffs doesn’t kill off one or more product lines entirely. I’m afraid it will though – it’s impossible that the loss of ~1800 won’t cripple one/two product teams severely. OTOH, management may have decided to swallow a couple bitter pills now rather than wait another two quarters. The ‘next gen’ Brazos chips shown on the client roadmap are Kabini and Temash, both using the new ‘Jaguar core’ and built on 28nm. (Brazos and Z-60 are 40nm chips).

          Temash is said to integrate the FCH (fusion controller hub) — maybe that’s the chip that gets the axe. ROI may be questionable – it may be wiser to just keep the FCH separate and build it on cheaper wafers. Sometimes super-integration is not the correct answer.

            • sschaem
            • 7 years ago

            AMD only expect to break even by Q3 2013.
            The layoff wasn’t a choice per say, it was layoff or filing for bankruptcy by Q2 2013.
            Yes, AMD situation is that bad.

            AMD said the road map isn’t changed, beside investing in assembly IP block for licensing.
            (licensing will make up 20% of their new business model)
            Their answer was “we will be more nimble so we can execute more efficiently”… ok.
            Maybe they should have fire 50% of the company then?

            The issue is that AMD is facing a wall. Intel will crush them with their Atom refresh at the low end.
            Intel is not fighting AMD anymore, they are done, Intel is fending of ARM.
            Intel is accelerating their 14nm migration, so 2013 will be a disaster for AMD at ALL levels.
            And ARM with windows8 RT is going to eatup their Jaguar hopes.

            AMD should have skipped piledriver and release steamroller yesterday…
            AMD is slower and slower at doing smaller and smaller incremental changes. its killing them.

            • phileasfogg
            • 7 years ago

            >>>>> And ARM with windows8 RT is going to eatup their Jaguar hopes.

            Actually, I think AMD may be somewhat prepared to counter this. Remember that they invested in BlueStacks – this software will allow >500K Android apps to run on x86 machines. (Qualcomm, Citrix and Andreesen-Horowitz have also invested in BlueStacks). Also, they’ve said that Z-60 (Hondo) has a bunch of design wins; we should start seeing them on shelves/e-tailers by November/December.

            In contrast, Win8-RT really doesn’t have a whole lot of apps that will run on it. (yet)

      • TheMonkeyKing
      • 7 years ago

      Or, another way of looking at this is to buy AMD stock @ $2 (or see if it goes as low as $1.85).

      The IP they have will be enough for a hostile takeover or acquisition by another to boost the stock to last year’s price of around $4.50. And with this price so low, you can go in as much as could stand without really losing your shirt.

      And no, Intel will not buy AMD IP. They already have alternatives and buying it to burying it is just a waste of their money. No, I think it would be another company that wants a better foothold into the computing device market (laptops, TVs, etc.)

        • link626
        • 7 years ago

        i’m 98% sure the stock will go down to $1.80

          • sschaem
          • 7 years ago

          What make you so optimistic ? From what I see AMD management will have AMD bankrupt by Q3 2013.

          Are you expecting Sony / Microsoft to be in a bidding war to get control of ATI IP for their console schedule for Q4 2013? This is a big gamble….

        • sschaem
        • 7 years ago

        This is a risky gamble. If any acquisition happen it will be most likely from bankrupcy proceedings.

      • Homeles
      • 7 years ago

      AMD’s x86 license is not valid if they are purchased by another company.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        not confirmed. since the antitrust the details of the new agreement haven’t been released.

        • sschaem
        • 7 years ago

        What make you think anyone is interested in acquiring an x86 license / business?

        AMD x86 business is a money pit, no one would acquire AMD for this.

          • Scrotos
          • 7 years ago

          What do you mean?!? x86 is highly profitable for companies besides Intel! I mean, just look at Cyrix, NexGen, Via, Transmeta, Centaur, um… oh dear. Nevermind!

    • Silus
    • 7 years ago

    “Expected” is the least one can say about these results. Forgetting for a moment the past problems that brought them to this state of affairs (the biggest being paying way too much for ATI) AMD only recently announced a chip that is focused on the mobile market. Something that most competitors are already doing for over two years…this lack of strategy in growing markets that are extremely profitable shows how poor AMD’s management was and has been. Being late to the game is one thing, but ignoring the market altogether for over two years is staggering. Obviously the financial difficulties won’t help in any market, is it a new one or one that has been their bread and butter since their inception. But that’s where the errors of the past kick-in and AMD never got over them.

    • Farting Bob
    • 7 years ago

    It’s looking more and more likely that AMD wont be around in it’s current form in 5 years. There is only go long that banks and investors can pump money into them before they say “enough is enough”. They already have a tonne of debt that keeps on growing and revenue is far too low to ever realistically pay it all off or even keep it at a manageable level.

    Dark times for AMD, everything they do seems to fall flat, their GPU division is doing ok but not amazing, their CPU division has been failing for a number of years, everyone of their high level execs is jumping ship the moment they find something else.

    I hope someone else can buy their x86 licence and start making desktop chips, because my next CPU upgrade better not cost $600 and provide a 10% boost in performance.

    • Tristan
    • 7 years ago

    Let they restructure Falldozer, not people or company. With failed products they won’t conquer any new markets and only accelerate their fail.

      • Meadows
      • 7 years ago

      “Fail” is not a noun.

        • Arclight
        • 7 years ago

        “Meadows” is not a friendly TR reader.

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          he’s my friend. my special friend…

            • Arclight
            • 7 years ago

            How does that that nullify my statement? Why would you count?

            Oh snap

            • ULYXX
            • 7 years ago

            I wonder if he feels proud about that. 😀

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        It’s just about to enter the Oxford dictionary as such. Language… shall we say.. “evolves”?

          • Meadows
          • 7 years ago

          It does, but in this case it’s wasteful. There’s already a noun form for “fail”, and it’s called “failure”.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            Wasteful? “fail” has only four letters; “failure” has seven.

            • Meadows
            • 7 years ago

            I guess I should say “needlessly redundant” then, in hopes of making it 150% clear to you.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            HOW’S THIS FOR CLEAR: NEELY GOT WITH YOUR MOM.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            I wouldn’t call it [i<]needlessly[/i<] redundant. It's shorter, so it's better. This happens all the time; for instance, why say "a refrigerator" when you could say "a fridge".

            • Meadows
            • 7 years ago

            They’re both nouns. People also call bicycles “bikes”.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            Some people use the word “bike” also as a verb. What’s your point?

      • jihadjoe
      • 7 years ago

      The next one would be WinterRoller I suppose? Then maybe followed by SpringDriver.

    • Arclight
    • 7 years ago

    Well with the crap CPUs they have been putting out in the past years (well maybe except for the Phenom II which was somewhat competitive due to agressive low prices) it’s no wonder they are losing money again.

    Dang it, how can they screw up 2 architectures one after another (Barcelona + Bulldozer)?

    It’s on them.

      • A_Pickle
      • 7 years ago

      It never ceases to amaze me how people are so quick to lambast AMD for “not having competitive CPU performance with Intel.” A quick look at the difference between profits (and revenues) of Intel and AMD should dispel any notion that the two somehow OUGHT to be neck-and-neck. Intel literally finishes the year with [i<]billions[/i<] of dollars of profit. That's -illions [i<]with a B[/i<]. AMD finished 2011 with $400 million-ish dollars in profits. To suggest that both of these companies have anywhere near the same level of resources to compete with one another is just... mind-blowingly lazy false equivalence. In my mind, what AMD is doing to remain competitive with Intel is clever, resourceful, and beneficial: Despite a staggering performance detriment, they're competing effectively at the low-end. They really do need a better CPU architecture, but honestly, they need a [i<]compelling[/i<] x86 tablet product that could offer similar battery life to Atom but superior GPU performance. If they could manage that, I think they could survive with some grace to spare. I really don't want a sole competitor in the x86 market. That'll suck.

        • Arclight
        • 7 years ago

        [quote=”A_Pickle”<]To suggest that both of these companies have anywhere near the same level of resources to compete with one another is just... mind-blowingly lazy false equivalence. [/quote<] I'm sorry but you are just wrong. AMD was always a smaller company but they managed to have a few architectures that surpassed Intel, despite the smaller income. Look at the gfx devision. The 7970 is pretty competitive against nvidia's GTX 680. How does AMD's budget for discrete gfx development compare to nvidia's? I'm willing to bet nvidia has the bigger budget and yet the performance difference is not as stark as it is on the CPU side when compared to chipzilla. Bottom line is, and i'm sure a few AMD representatives admited it, they screwed up on the architecture.

          • Antimatter
          • 7 years ago

          Some would argue that some AMD’s successful products were not necessarily due to outperformance but rather missteps from their competitors (eg. Netburst and Fermi).

            • Arclight
            • 7 years ago

            Well that super argument works the other way around too. Intel is so great now because AMD had 2 consecutive missteps. nvidia was great when AMD had the massive fail HD 2000 and 3000 series which barely reached the performance of mid end cards that nvidia offered at that time.

            • Antimatter
            • 7 years ago

            Over the longer term Intel has consistently outperformed AMD and the same can be said of Nvidia more recently.

            [url<]http://scalibq.wordpress.com/2009/10/26/are-all-amd-fans-idiots/[/url<] While I don't agree with everything the above blog post, the author does make valid points. At the end of the day AMD's limited financial resources will limit AMD's relative future performance, more so considering Intel substantial lead.

    • BoBzeBuilder
    • 7 years ago

    Reason for AMDs demise:

    They abandoned us poor S939 users.

      • travbrad
      • 7 years ago

      It’s a good thing Intel doesn’t change sockets/chipsets so often.

      Oh wait..

        • Homeles
        • 7 years ago

        Intel changes sockets so frequently because they continually integrate more devices onto their CPUs. Every time they move something on-package, the electrical pin-out must change. That means they have to design a new socket.

        AMD on the other hand hasn’t moved anything on package since their very first 64bit processor. That’s excluding their APU lineup of course, which happen to be on 2 new sockets. Why’d they move to FMX? Because they moved the graphics processor on-die.

        So yes, continue to complain about the progress Intel makes with integration and exploiting that increased integration.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      I love the sarcasm.

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    More layoffs? The thing AMD needs to understand is they can’t keep on laying off people. It just gives talented people another reason not to join AMD because working for the company is like walking a tightrope where you could lose your job any time the company reports its financials. What they need to understand is that they have to make really good products, and it doesn’t matter if Rory is the last and only guy working for AMD — if they don’t make good products they won’t make money and he might as well fire himself.

    • tbone8ty
    • 7 years ago

    the FX-8120 is on sale for $139.99, thats a pretty sweet deal

    [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103961&name=Processors-Desktops[/url<]

      • A_Pickle
      • 7 years ago

      Not given it’s gaming performance, general performance, and power consumption numbers.

        • Arclight
        • 7 years ago

        Yup it’s almost better to buy a Phenom II 980, or even better just to buy an Intel chip.

          • Medallish
          • 7 years ago

          If you found an Intel Chip for that price I guarantee you it’s singlethreaded performance isn’t much better, and, it will be behind completely when it comes to multithreading. Not to mention that you can overclock this one, do Intel even have a k CPU in this price range?

          • Rza79
          • 7 years ago

          Are you saying that a FX-8120 is slower than an Intel i3? Because it most definitely isn’t.

            • Arclight
            • 7 years ago

            I don’t have a review at hand but i’m pretty sure that the i3 3240 is faster for desktop applications. Don’t know about niche productivity tests, but suppose that some of them will favor a quad moduled bulldozer but for the rest the Intel chip should be faster while consuming less power.

            In an ideal world i would also have wanted the Intel chips to be overclockable but i doubt that even OCed the 8120 will fare much better in single threaded applications, let alone surpass Ivy i3s…….not to mention power consumption when OCed:
            [url<]https://techreport.com/review/21848/amd-fx-8150-further-overclocked/2[/url<] Edit: [quote<]Pop over to the gaming scatter, though, and the picture changes dramatically. There, the FX-8350 is the highest-performance AMD desktop processor to date for gaming, finally toppling the venerable Phenom II X4 980. Yet the FX-8350's gaming performance almost exactly matches that of the Core i3-3225, a $134 Ivy Bridge-based processor. Meanwhile, the Core i5-3470 delivers markedly superior gaming performance for less money than the FX-8350. [/quote<] [url<]https://techreport.com/review/23750/amd-fx-8350-processor-reviewed/14[/url<] Ha! So i was right all along. Take that people who down rated my post.

            • rrr
            • 7 years ago

            You can’t OC i3, but you can OC FX. After OC, yes i3 will most likely be slower.

        • sschaem
        • 7 years ago

        What GPU & resolution do you game at that the CPU actually matters ???

        Even at 1920×1200 on the highest end GPU, CPU barely affect frame rate.

        I see conflicting numbers, but it seem to me the fx-8120 would be a better deal overall then an i3
        Not only for gaming but general usage.
        For the power draw under load, my overclock Q6600 consume more…
        For desktop, iddle power & performance / $ is my #1 concern.

    • juampa_valve_rde
    • 7 years ago

    Like Rory said they had to rush due to market change, and thats bad as they where looking for stable finances, and now they have to play safe on the bank (and not the people and development). Bad for all that people getting fired.

    In the times of Jerry Sanders they were always in trouble but always managed to pull something from the hat, now there is no such thing on sight.

    I hope the radeon development team dont get cut madly, they are performing really well since the 3000 series, building better and better tech. The exploding bomb was probably bulldozer, expensive to develop and a dog in every aspect.

    • Deanjo
    • 7 years ago

    Reading AMD’s financials lately reminds me of Old Yeller. Once a trusted friend, gets bitten, tries to be nursed back to health but eventually has to be shot.

    • StashTheVampede
    • 7 years ago

    Fire sale on Llano, PLEASE! Just want to build a low power, headless box, that will sit idle 99% of the time and will occasionally use the SSD and 8GB I want to slap in there.

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      You mean like this:

      [url<]http://www.cpu-world.com/news_2012/2012101701_AMD_to_cut_prices_of_A4-Series_APUs.html[/url<]

    • sschaem
    • 7 years ago

    Sadly this is the tip of the iceberg… (Their Q3 012 financial report is quite rotten)

    From what I can tell, AMD is in panic mode with this layoff plan because they cant finance any more debt (Half a billion on the books already) so if they dont do the layoff it mean entering bankruptcy.

    Beside the doom and gloom AMD put itself into, what I find interesting is that AMD expect 20% of its business wont come from CPU or GPU sales but from licensing IP by the end of 2013… AMD is preparing itself for a big change in its busines model.

    And its pretty much confirmed, they have the sony (and/or microsoft deal).
    And in turn we know a new console will be out before xmas 2014.

    We see it every quarter, AMD is slowly destroying its value.
    If AMD stay in AMD hands, by 2014 Via & Matrox is going to have a new competitor . sigh

    To put things in perceptive, AMD paid 365 million for Seamicro this year and AMD market cap is now 1,850 million, so Seamicro represent 20% of AMD entire market cap.
    If we take the reminder… 1,475 and assume 50% represent ATI.
    ATI is now worth 737 million…. a company AMD acquired for almost 6 billion $

    All the while nvidia is swimming in money.

      • destroy.all.monsters
      • 7 years ago

      I don’t think it’s so much that it is as long as they are their own company – as much as it is this board and management.

      I completely agree that they seem to be following Transmeta et. al. into the mere licensing arena (hiring someone outside of tech like Read would seem to be an indicator here) – and sadly likely into patent trollery. Maybe if ARM bought them and it were played out as a merger maybe they could get a breath of fresh air but I have my doubts. Otherwise short of a shot in the arm from Abu Dhabi I don’t see it.

      Good post and points.

        • sschaem
        • 7 years ago

        I never thought of this possibility… but ARM being able to gobble up ATI wouldn’t be a bad long term plan for both company.

        Edit: actually I dont see how ARM would really profit from the deal.
        Apple seem like a better candidate… unless they already have created a new GPU code themselves. I recall some of the top ATI architect defect to Apple many year ago.

        AMD sell ATI to ARM, for a couple of billion. Pay off all debt, and have about 1.5 billion cushion for advanced R&D. And focus on Opteron & growing the CPU agnostic seamicro business.

        I just dont see AMD being able to make money with their APU, and the SoC market is going to be even more brutal. I think they are wasting their time & efforts.

        A new profitable and debt free AMD, with loads of cash and free to focus on 1 core market.

        And we have ATI live on in consoles, and SoC ofl all kinds.

        Actually if AMD where to do this (just put up ATI for sale), I’m sure Apple would be interested.

          • destroy.all.monsters
          • 7 years ago

          Apple would likely be interested if they could get it for a song. We’d lose ATI entirely for gaming as a result though.

          I kind of doubt ARM would want just the ATI side (I should think that ganging up on the server side against intel or hybridized chips would be considerations) though but as it is this is all guesswork.

            • sschaem
            • 7 years ago

            Not entirely. MS & Sony might not be able to take advantage of AMD anymore, but I’m sure Apple would introduce a nice iTV refresh that would give game console some decent competition. And have decent openGL/CL support in all their mac products.
            AMD also is not that far in producing SoC level GPU, this would put Apple SoC for iphone / ipad in a unique advantage. Apple thrive for exclusivity.

            Apple will most likely make 1 to 2 billion in profit from the ipad mini before the end of the year.
            I’m sure if AMD offered the GPU division for 1.5 to 3 billion, Apple would jump on the opportunity.

            But yes, no more windows GPU.. but then MS is make this happen by fragmenting windows with windows RT anyways, so we might get to run Windows game on future Adreno .
            See ATI GPU are back on the PC for gaming 🙂

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<]AMD sell ATI to ARM, for a couple of billion.[/quote<] And where do you think ARM would get that kind of money? ARM's annual revenue is less than $1bil, and annual profit less than half of that. Don't be fooled by the "market cap". It's not real money - it's a speculative bubble.

            • Diplomacy42
            • 7 years ago

            ever heard of a “cash and stock deal?”

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            Sure, but that works only if the “stock” is actually valued reasonably. P/E>60 is not. Would AMD go for it at ARM’s current “market value”? I doubt it.

            • sschaem
            • 7 years ago

            I agree. the idea that ARM would and could acquire ATI technology and integrate into their IP portfolio is unrealistic.

      • BaronMatrix
      • 7 years ago

      And of course Intel has been playing fair… BaronMatrix says you all should be ripped off by them…

      They even crapped on a NON-PROFIT… I’d burn their HQ down if I thought I could get away with it…

      They make the Free Market look REALLY BAD…

        • chuckula
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]I'd burn their HQ down if I thought I could get away with it...[/quote<] Don't worry Baron, after you packed all of your CPUs in Styrofoam and slid them 30' across a shag carpet, it turns out that none of them were functional for you to lookup the location of Intel's HQ. Oh, and pro-tip: Dousing yourself in gasoline and lighting yourself on fire in the parking lot won't burn down the HQ, but might be very entertaining.

          • JumpingJack
          • 7 years ago

          +100

          That episode is still, to this day, unbelievable. Hehehe, I still laugh at it!

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        uhwhaaa?

    • NeelyCam
    • 7 years ago

    [url<]http://allthingsd.com/20121018/amd-confirms-job-cuts-of-15-percent-swings-to-quarterly-loss/[/url<] [quote<]"Read has brought in a team of business consultants from McKinsey & Company and BCG (the former Boston Consulting Group) to advise the company on how to fix its business model. McKinsey’s role is said to involve identifying and handling the job cuts. BCG’s role is said by people familiar with the situation to be consulting on what has been described as a “grand strategy” to take the company forward."[/quote<] This is like straight from Office Space.. Just don't take the red stapler

      • shank15217
      • 7 years ago

      Amd has no chance in retaining talent unless they get in the black, if that means laying off half its workforce that’s fine. They ate their own shoe trying to compete with Intel in the apu space. Trinity turned out to really hurt them. They should have sold their llano chips to break even before introducing trinity. Loosing 100mil to inventory write off is just sad. These chips get placed into the most budget laptops manufacturers can device anyways. Amd has the best chance in the server space, mobile space, and GPU. They should abandon the consumer laptop and desktop CPU race or highly consolidate it. AMD still has a lot of respect from the console market, time to push that as far as possible.

        • destroy.all.monsters
        • 7 years ago

        Given how they’ve treated their top talent and the brain drain since removing AMD fellows and the like (from the last round of layoffs) and installing what seem to be more Read yes men (with the exception of Dr. Su) I’d argue that they’ll never be able to retain talent as long as this management team is in place. Apple’s only a couple miles away, intel and Nvidia are too, better to work for them.

          • shank15217
          • 7 years ago

          How do you mean? How do you know that they treated their top talent bad? AMD spends over 1 billion in RnD per year. For a company that is perpetually in the red that’s pretty amazing to me.

            • destroy.all.monsters
            • 7 years ago

            [url<]http://www.engadget.com/2012/07/24/amd-exec-behind-wii-and-xbox-360-graphics-jumps-to-nvidia/[/url<] [url<]http://www.brightsideofnews.com/news/2012/8/17/anand-mandapati--david-wang-key-console-and-desktop-gpu-architects-leave-amd-.aspx[/url<] It isn't proof as such, and it's arduous trolling through fora but there is some reason why so many talented people keep fleeing - this has been going on ever since the first round of layoffs - and since Read took over. Treating Fellows as expendable isn't a great way to show that you value engineering talent - or that you've got a vision or a long term view of maintaining the company as it is. It's certainly inarguable that tons of high level talent has left since Read came in. If it were merely that AMD were in the red there would have been a larger exodus during the Ruiz and Meyer years than there is now. Here's another take - [url<]http://www.extremetech.com/computing/137796-amd-executives-have-forgotten-how-to-run-a-company[/url<]

            • shank15217
            • 7 years ago

            AMD has a strong culture of taking on goliath,, there is nothing wrong with that attitude from an engineering point of view, however they were losing the fighting trying to take on two giants in the PC industry at the same time. Read wanted a competitive AMD that made money for its investors and that’s what the board wants. AMD is turning out to be another DEC or SUN and Read is trying his best to avoid that. AMD needs to make money now and when AMD gets back on its feet they can hire that talent back. This is a gamble and people will lose out but hopefully the company stays relevant years down the line.

            • destroy.all.monsters
            • 7 years ago

            ” Read wanted a competitive AMD that made money for its investors and that’s what the board wants. ”

            And Meyer didn’t? I’m not sure what your point is here.

            “AMD is turning out to be another DEC or SUN and Read is trying his best to avoid that. ” – How? I don’t see how AMD is like either of those companies. They don’t have their own OS, build they’re own computers and don’t have vertically integrated businesses.

            “AMD needs to make money now and when AMD gets back on its feet they can hire that talent back. ”

            That strikes me as wishful thinking. If he’d stated clearly that there would be no bonuses for management until they were able to rehire them – which would show their solidarity and willingness to share the pain as well as show engineers how valuable they are to the firm I might agree with you. What it looks like to me is management taking the money while the money is good.

            “We under-estimated the speed of change in our industry. We expected to have several years to transform the AMD business,” Read said. “We must diversify beyond the traditional PC market and become a leader in fast-growing and adjacent markets.” From :

            [url<]http://www.marketwatch.com/story/amd-finally-wakes-up-to-grim-reality-2012-10-18?siteid=yhoof2[/url<] Didn't Read say from the get he was going to change AMD and focus it? To diversify away from the traditional PC market place? Numerous products were killed when he came on board so why didn't this change happen sooner? If he and the board "under-estimated the speed of change" then what was Seifert doing for 8-9 months after Meyer was supposedly fired for this very reason. Overall I'm not sure why you are optimistic particularly when it looks like the board and CEO don't have a direction (and proving it by hiring consultants). Cleaning house seems to be the only real possibility of saving this company in my view.

        • sschaem
        • 7 years ago

        Server? AMD drop off the map with their latest architecture. Even after 5 year of well funded R&D under Dirk Meyer, the result is almost a complete flop.

        Mobile? You think AMD can compete against qualcomm, Apple, Samsung, Nvidia, Intel in that market… this market require very aggressive R&D pace, and everyone got a 3+ year head start.

        Console? they already have ‘all’ the contracts. what more do you want them to do ??

        Short of a miracle AMD is going to continue to shrink for the next 18 month.

        Next quarter, AMD expect to drop revenue another 9 to 13% sequentially. You might think “bha 10% drop in revenue, no big deal” But that after a 28% drop.

        So AMD Q4 will have ****41%**** less revenue then last year AND lose 15% of its workforce AND have a 80 million charge. + all the usual “1 time charge”

        no server, mobile, console focus will help… only a miracle.

          • shank15217
          • 7 years ago

          Well certainly not your doom and gloom preaching. AMD has a stronger server product than desktop including a stronger platform than their desktop. They also have the channel support and vendor support. They can come back in the server space with much better margins, piledriver should address bulldozers weaknesses.

            • sschaem
            • 7 years ago

            piledriver is not addressing BD weakness. The cache is still not functioning right and the memory control is still busted. From what we know you get 15% better power efficiency at best.

            Steamroller is the BD fix. But it seem AMD pushed that back to 2014.

            So far AMD sever market is shrinking, it less then 5% now ?

            No way piledriver will reverse this trend. With intel Introducing 14nm server chip next year and HP and other focusing on ARM for low power server, I would expect AMD to become total irrelevant before steamroller is even announced.

            Sorry to be so negative, but AMD give us no hope of reversing the trend they put in place years ago.

            I actually find Trinity to be a great product, but that window is closing thanks to MS and windows8 RT (pun intended) So AMD is going to face more, no less competition.

            Ok. realistically. what is AMD future ? I mean what product on their road map (that is not delayed) will increase their margin and sales? I see nothing. Thats why they are shifting their business to IP licensing VS product development.

            Its freaking sad, but what do you want me to say?

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]With intel Introducing 14nm server chip next year and HP and other focusing on ARM for low power server[/quote<] I don't think you got the timeline right. Next year will bring Ivy Bridge and possibly some Haswell based server stuff: [url<]http://forwardthinking.pcmag.com/none/302571-intel-discusses-22nm-xeon-haswell-chips-for-data-center[/url<] Even 14nm Broadwell consumer chips aren't coming next year, and server chips have been lagging consumer chips by a year or two for a while now

            • Action.de.Parsnip
            • 7 years ago

            I would agree with all of that except:

            “piledriver is not addressing BD weakness. The cache is still not functioning right and the memory control(ler) is still busted.”

            I don’t think the memory controller would even be No.3 on the list of ‘what needs doing again’ on bulldozer, let alone No.2.

            If I remember correctly Anand said the issues were:

            1) L1 caches (way) too small, L2 cache too slow,
            2) Not enough instruction decoding capacity,
            3) Branch MISS-prediction penalty very high.

            But you’re right, Piledriver doesn’t change any of these, it’s just a ….. quick and dirty fix. The potentially unfolding tragedy here is that Kabini get’s pushed forward and Kaveri, with the unified address space for CPU + GPU, re-engineered L1 + L2 caches and dual decoders per module gets pushed back to 2014, as per a very recent rumour, instead of 2H 2013.

            I don’t think it’s stretching the imagination that the next revision of Bulldozer, the one that targets the two greatest weaknesses of the architecture as it stands now, would be the one that *potentially* makes those CPUs something with real merit in buying, even against Haswell et al. I think too we all have a good idea what sort of improvement Vishera will be over it’s predecessor, that is a slight one, but that would be appropriate to the changes made in Piledriver, which correspondingly were slight too. If Steamroller really does have a more well developed cache system and a decoder per integer core, then it’s very reasonable to expect that IPC would grow considerably, especially for client (i.e. desktop) workloads. Games in particular.

            Alas, by making a point that Kabini is on target for it’s intended launch date while not saying the same for Kaveri, I think AMDs revenue prospects for the medium term are at risk of being kicked down the road like the proverbial tin can.
            I heard from somewhere, sorry I can’t remember where, the Kaveri has already completed the ‘design phase’ and has moved into validation and the development of initial prototypes. I can’t help but feel a relatively small amount of investment now would be the money spent that would make all that was spent before it in developing this new CPU architecture something remotely worth embarking on it all in the first place.

      • destroy.all.monsters
      • 7 years ago

      I have to be blunt – if you need someone else to do your strategy then you’re not a CEO you’re a placeholder. The only reason to give the exorbitant pay is because the person holding the job has a vision (not one that hires a firm so they can escape stockholder revolt).

      I plus one’d you despite how upsetting this is. It’s a good article.

        • Peldor
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<] if you need someone else to do your strategy then you're not a CEO you're a placeholder.[/quote<] Ouch. I'd like to see the look on R. Read's face if someone dropped that line on him at a board meeting.

    • destroy.all.monsters
    • 7 years ago

    🙁

    I can’t speak for Texas or Ontario but in a state and region where the cost of living is as high as Manhattan this is terrible news. I feel for these folks and hope that they actually don’t give out bonuses to those doing the cutting (a truly heinous practice in my view).

    I have to think that there is or was another alternative.

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      I hope they give out decent severance packages. These are people with families relying on them.

      And looking at all the insane compensation R.Read and all the other incompetent executives have enjoyed all these years really pisses me off.

        • quasi_accurate
        • 7 years ago

        In the past, severance has been 2 months of pay and benefits.

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          Regardless of how long they’ve been employed? Doesn’t seem decent to me… It’s hard to find a job in two months in this market. (Those who can, they either don’t get fired, or have left already)

            • designerfx
            • 7 years ago

            There’s no rule or even a requirement for severance, actually. It’s entirely up to the employer. The good news is, these people probably knew there was a possibility and have had time to search for other jobs (hopefully) + having a 2 month cushion.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]There's no rule or even a requirement for severance, actually. It's entirely up to the employer.[/quote<] Yeah, I know... I just like to think that employers would have a bit more respect towards their soon-to-be-ex-employees' past contributions than what two months represents... Also, the word on how they treat employees during layoffs gets around, and will affect their hiring later. As a comparison, Nokia gave 6-12month severances (maybe more, but that's the range I heard from people I know) during layoffs, and with the recent one they even had a transition program, giving ex-employees an extra 25keur to set up tech startups

          • destroy.all.monsters
          • 7 years ago

          Still there? Hope you’re not on the chopping block.

        • chuckula
        • 7 years ago

        LMAO… somebody downthumbed Neely for actually caring about the people being fired. Apparently some of the AMD fanbois are so religious that they consider the fired employees to be evil heathans who should have been burned at the stake as a sacrifice to the AMD gods or something.

        EDIT: Ahh.. I see BaronMatrix is trolling the thread, he [b<]is[/b<] enough of a religious whackjob to think that 15% of AMD's workforce were a bunch of traitors or something stupid like that.

          • internetsandman
          • 7 years ago

          A comment showing caring and hope for others amidst difficult and unfortunate times gets downvoted….I can’t even come up with a semi-decent witty comment towards that

            • Meadows
            • 7 years ago

            I simply have a hard time believing NeelyCam is honest. I did not give him the minus, however. (Not yet.)

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            you know he’s a bleeding heart liberal. i’m sure it was honest.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            It was honest. Not just because I’m for the people and against corporate evil, but also because I’ve been fired once in my career, and remember it being a pretty awful experience.

            And I have a couple of friends that were fired in the last three years, and one couldn’t find a new job for two years.

    • sweatshopking
    • 7 years ago

    gg amd

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      I grant you “Frist stop” even though the spambot beat you. He’ll get duke nuked and your record will be adjusted to reflect the difference.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        thank you sire!

      • Arclight
      • 7 years ago

      no re?

    • aim18
    • 7 years ago

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