Friday night topic: Open thread

We’re fresh out of Friday night topics, so we’re going to open the floor.  Discuss.  And behave.

Comments closed
    • Welch
    • 7 years ago

    Going to be a dad!!!

    12 Weeks 3 Days :), don’t know the sex yet.

    [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JP1X8xdUSN4[/url<] Jumpy little guy.... or gal.

      • just brew it!
      • 7 years ago

      Congrats!

        • Welch
        • 7 years ago

        Thanks, hopefully everything goes alright. Supposedly once your past week 12, miscarriage is much lower but there is always SOMETHING to be worried about. Not sure I’ve ever been this happy about something!

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          Puts all these internet debates into perspective, now doesn’t it…?

      • Arclight
      • 7 years ago

      Congratulations!

      Hang in there chief.

      • oldDummy
      • 7 years ago

      Enjoy the journey.
      Good Luck

      • shaq_mobile
      • 7 years ago

      oh and shaq_mobile is a popular boy and girls name this coming year.

        • Welch
        • 7 years ago

        Ahaha, I’ll have to keep that name in mind 😉

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      Congratz!

      And as is expected of me and my socialist tendencies: assuming you’re in the US, let me suggest you take the whole 12 weeks of federally protected bonding leave. And take it towards the end of the accepted time period.

    • albundy
    • 7 years ago

    spending some quality time this weekend trying to get a 486 DX2 40mhz with 20mb of ram to underclock to 6mhz running windows 2000. record was 7mhz! cpu isn’t even effin intel! its ST Micro’s 486! the case has an intel inside sticker, haha. those were the days. back then, there were no lamer and noob bs’ing, OMG’ing, and LOLz to worry about. there were no cheap parts…capacitors were of good quality…they didn’t leak or blow on you unlike todays disater of mobos. back then, you treated the mobo manual as a bible, then changed board dip switches after, and finally mumbled a prayer that you didn’t overvolt/superclock anything before powering up.

      • Scrotos
      • 7 years ago

      Word.

    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    Halloween party this weekend… Best way to get people to leave after the party ends and the music is off, but pretty inebriated people persist that the party is still rockin on?

      • flip-mode
      • 7 years ago

      Turn off the main circuit breaker.

        • shaq_mobile
        • 7 years ago

        thats the worst thing to do with drunk halloween partiers. just call the cops, thats what i do when i want to crash my own parties. then again, i live in a college town so the cops don’t have much real stuff to do…

        dont tase me bro!

          • just brew it!
          • 7 years ago

          Remind me to never come to one of your parties…

    • Sam125
    • 7 years ago

    I just finished my first playthrough of X-COM:EU. The main part of the game is fun but they should’ve stuck to the same ending of the original as the ending of X-Com:EU felt really subpar compared to the rest of the game IMO. However, overall the game is really [b<]fun[/b<] and although it has a lot of valid criticisms, I think it's a worthy successor to the Microprose X-COMs. My next goal in X-COM:EU is to now beat the game on Classic + Ironman mode. =)

    • derFunkenstein
    • 7 years ago

    Finished a huge recording project this week. Just got to get the replicated discs back DiscMakers. Totally stoked.

    If you love religious Christmas music, check this out. If you don’t, feel free to just downvote me instead.

    [url<]http://soundcloud.com/derfunkenstein/adeste-fideles-sc[/url<] [url<]http://soundcloud.com/derfunkenstein/come-rejoice-believers[/url<]

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      +1 I’m known to keep my christmas tree up for 3-4 months.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        My wife totally would go for that, but I like to take it down in early-mid January. My parents always took theirs down on New Year’s Day but I’m good going another week.

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<]I like to take it down in early-mid January.[/quote<] Any particular reason why...?

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            Usually the weekend after the traditional date Epiphany is observed (January 6). As to why, I just get tired of looking at the tree. lol

            • BIF
            • 7 years ago

            LOL

            And congrats on the music CD!

      • anotherengineer
      • 7 years ago

      nice

      I’ve always had a bias towards the piano, and I have listened to this one a hundred times

      [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xi7ab375XGI[/url<]

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        That was amazing. Really technical but a load of expressiveness along with it. They were so locked in with their tempos together, and it’s not like they were playing with a metronome. Great arrangement. And the surprise at the 2:10 mark was pretty slick. Well executed.

      • flip-mode
      • 7 years ago

      Will it hurt your feelings if I downvote? I don’t want to hurt your feelings.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        It takes a lot more than a minus here to hurt my feelings. Lol

    • Arclight
    • 7 years ago

    When will we get passed on the memory wall on desktop computers? If this is not going to happen then what’s the next big advance for computers? Comparable to the jump form HDDs to SSDs or single core to multicore processors let’s say.

      • rrr
      • 7 years ago

      Hmmmm, we have enough processing power due to multicores.

      We have enough storage performance due to SSDs.

      What would be needed is a paradigm shift like quantum computing. But that probably won’t happen for a while.

        • Geistbar
        • 7 years ago

        Quantum computing isn’t the computing cure-all that people like to make it out to be. In practice, I’d be very very surprised if they ever became something available to a home user during our lifetimes.

        • just brew it!
        • 7 years ago

        I’m convinced that quantum computing is way over-hyped. It does potentially have some legitimate applications (e.g. cryptography), but mostly it is a buzz word that is used by PhDs to convince venture capitalists to fund their pet projects.

      • Flatland_Spider
      • 7 years ago

      The memory wall will be broken when Intel adds a 4GB L4 cache as part of a desktop targeted SoC, and we have NVRAM as our main memory.

        • Arclight
        • 7 years ago

        But, but i want my PC to be upgradable, both in terms of CPU and memory. Why SoC? I get that the intention is to move more and more parts to the CPU for added efficiency but there are issues that haven’t been addressed yet……like no matter how hard you try you can’t get a high end CPU and high end GPU and enough RAM and GDDR to satisfy both chips on the SoC with today’s tech.

        What you’re talking about will take much more time imo (close to decades). I’m talking about something short terms (few years to half a decade). I mean we saw the advent of consumer multi core CPUs and SSDs in LESS than a decade.

      • Geistbar
      • 7 years ago

      The next big shift for memory is probably a universal memory/storage setup. Many of the nonvolatile memory technologies being worked on are about as fast as DRAM (key word: about, I believe all of them are at least somewhat slower), with similar densities to flash. It’d require a lot of changes to the computing framework to make it work, but if the rest of the system could be figured right for it, it’s not implausible that we wouldn’t have RAM in the traditional sense anymore.

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      Next big step…. Thunderbolt neural interface. 😛

    • odizzido
    • 7 years ago

    Just pull a hollywood and start remaking old friday night topics.

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      Now, in 3D!!

      • Sargent Duck
      • 7 years ago

      I seem to recall a Friday night topic concerning the Iraq war II back in 2003…

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        WANNA DO IT? I’M GAME

        Actually, no… I’ll sign off now. Gotta play some GTA4 on PS3

    • Prion
    • 7 years ago

    It’s actually a Saturday Morning Topic for many parts of the world.

    • leor
    • 7 years ago

    I like cheese.

    Cheese first!

      • Squeazle
      • 7 years ago

      What type is your favorite?

      Min is havarti with dill. Not because it’s the most amazing cheese in the world, but it’s quite good and it makes me happy. It’s also available everywhere.

      Edit: Well… everywhere in Wisconsin anyways.

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        Swiss cheese is great when it’s warm/ hot. For cold cheese, I prefer sharpest possible cheddar.
        Oh, and blue cheese/gorgonzola is good stuff.

        • Meadows
        • 7 years ago

        Camembert and trappist.

        Temperature is irrelevant. I’ve cooked [i<]pizza[/i<] before with camembert crumbles on top.

          • just brew it!
          • 7 years ago

          Oooh yeah, need to add Trappist cheese to my list as well. Wash it down with a nice glass of Trappist ale. 😀

        • dmjifn
        • 7 years ago

        Havarti with dill is very tasty, I agree.

        Currently, my favorite is cotswold.
        Previously, it was that layered double gloucester / blue stilton combo. But it started giving me heartburn.
        Been kind of burned out on the other european and american cheeses.

        • just brew it!
        • 7 years ago

        Well-aged extra sharp cheddar… or a really strong blue. Smoked gouda is really nice too.

    • sschaem
    • 7 years ago

    By the end of the year Apple will most likely have over 130 billion in cash to ‘spend’.
    Apple said they keep that money for a big move… what do you expect Apple will do with that money?

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      Kegger with pizza.

        • Squeazle
        • 7 years ago

        For the planet.

          • Arclight
          • 7 years ago

          iGlob has a nice ring to it. Nahhh, it would take more than 0.13 trillions to buy even the U.S.
          Guess they could buy a couple of 3rd world countries at a nice discount though. They might throw in another one as a bonus.

      • Meadows
      • 7 years ago

      They’re going to build the Axiom and shoot all of the world off into space. Or at the very least, they will patent Mars and sue NASA.

      • Flatland_Spider
      • 7 years ago

      They’re going to get Adam Reed and Matt Thompson to write the second season of Frisky Dingo.

      • oldDummy
      • 7 years ago

      Buy Microsoft

    • KWReid
    • 7 years ago

    With Windows phone 8 launching soon. Seriously, and realistically, what would it take to make it a successful 3rd place contender within the next 2 years?

    Is it possible?

      • trackerben
      • 7 years ago

      Sure it is possible. Any newer ecosystem and its wider partners alliance must be maximally affordable yet available so that the maximum number of people can globally exchange messages and gifts and transact purchases, with delivery and fulfillment of physicals within 72 hours. Any system which perfects this ancient requirement is a top candidate.

      • mcnabney
      • 7 years ago

      An asteroid the size of Texas

    • NeelyCam
    • 7 years ago

    Would it make sense to try to make an 8k display using four 1080p projectors?

      • chuckula
      • 7 years ago

      No, because they could only make a 4K display.

      More seriously, you’d need a pretty big wall/screen and some good cabinets to get that setup in a way where you don’t see noticeable borders between the edges of the images.

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        Ah, you’re right. I misunderstood what the K stood for in 4K..

        The setup would be tricky.. I’d use ceiling mount, so I could place the projectors wherever they need to be for the screen size… I have a 100″ screen now, but I could increase it by about 15% in both dimensions. Even then, I think the projectors would likely have to be pretty close to the screen.

        Meanwhile, I don’t think it would be too difficult to adjust the projectors so that the edges would line up pretty much perfectly. Even in my cheapo $1500 1080p projector, the lens can be moved up/down/left/right, and the zoom is also easily adjustable.

        I do think that with a huge screen like that, it’s pretty important to put the speakers behind it and use an acoustically (near-)transparent material. Otherwise the sound would just come from the “wrong place”

      • mcnabney
      • 7 years ago

      No, and I’ll give you the same reason that I gave the dweebs at AVS forums.

      The pixel density on an 8K display is so high that the viewing angle required to see the full resolution pushes over 100 degrees. Nobody but stupid teenagers want to deal with such a massive screen. For movies or games you would be constantly turning your head and you would only be able to keep a tiny bit of the image in the highly focused and detailed area of your eye (fovea).

      4K is awesome enough. Don’t push it.

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        You sound a bit arrogant, calling people “dweebs” and “stupid”

        [quote<]The pixel density on an 8K display is so high that the viewing angle required to see the full resolution pushes over 100 degrees.[/quote<] Are you implying that every single person on earth has the same exact ability to distinguish pixels from each other? Or what math/biology are you basing that statement on? [quote<]For movies or games you would be constantly turning your head[/quote<] Eyes move, you know

          • Meadows
          • 7 years ago

          Only moving your eyes [i<]that much[/i<] creates an awkward feeling, so you'd keep moving your head as well.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            True.

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 7 years ago

            The point of that huge of screen would be to simulation peripheral vision. Which renders the whole conversation moot.

          • jihadjoe
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<] Or what math/biology are you basing that statement on?[/quote<] Going by biology, the human eye has about 120 million photoreceptor cells, so until we get to 120 megapixels the resolution isn't high enough. Even if we only consider the central part of our vision, we'd still need way more pixels than 4k, or even 8k screens can give us.

        • bhtooefr
        • 7 years ago

        Although NHK has done experiments on this, and found that there’s benefits to resolution well beyond where the pixels go indistinguishable.

        [url<]http://www.nhk.or.jp/strl/results/annual2010/2010_chapter1.pdf[/url<] I'll note that 30 cpd, where they started their experiment, is roughly equivalent to 60 ppd, or Apple's metric for what a "Retina display" is.

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<]Apple's metric for what a "Retina display" is.[/quote<] Apple's metric is not static, and varies wildly from phone to laptop.

        • dpaus
        • 7 years ago

        Hey, dweeb, we did it for an Emergency Operations Centre, where it was used to show a huge, high-detail map of the city. And (once set up, which took a whole day) it worked beautifully.

        Next up: a 3×3 array 🙂 (no, seriously…)

      • anotherengineer
      • 7 years ago

      Hmmm Now you have me thinking of an 3-way eyefinity projector setup with no bezels mmmmmmmmmmm

    • chuckula
    • 7 years ago

    I’m getting a GTX 560 for a very very reasonable price (free). It’s going to be an upgrade for my almost 5 year old GT 8800 that I use on my desktop. Any games you would recommend that can run with this setup? (Oh, and I’m using Linux, what you though this would be easy?)

    (CPU is a Core 2 Duo @ 3.6 Ghz, next year is upgrade year).

      • druidcent
      • 7 years ago

      Are you me?? I’m doing the exact same thing .. except I’ve got a core i7-3770K

        • chuckula
        • 7 years ago

        I envy your quad-core awesomeness! Yeah, my Dad is a big folding fan and he had a 560 that he wasn’t using so it’s being shipped over here. I’ll probably use it in this PC + the new one (Haswell barring an Intel disaster) for a while and eventually do another GPU upgrade.

    • lilbuddhaman
    • 7 years ago

    What kickstarter games are you looking at?

    Do you think the ones you’ve recently funded are going to deliver?

    One interesting one I followed was Sealark, a few borrowed elements, but all around a unique enough entity to be called “original”. The dev seems to actually be an “indie” wanting to get a break. [url<]http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1338986832/sealark-an-oceanic-adventure-game[/url<] edit: And no, I'm not particularly "into" cutesy anime girlie games, but the premise doesn't degrade from the funding + attention it's gotten.

    • jdaven
    • 7 years ago

    I’m planning to write a science fiction novel. Any ideas?

      • chuckula
      • 7 years ago

      Wacky half-scifi half-fantasy setup where a modern soldiers from the real world get sucked into a medieval dimension with the standard medieval weaponry (and dragons to make it interesting) vs. a technologically advanced but numerically inferior force. Would always be interested to see how that would play out.

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      Write about somebody suddenly realizing that (s)he has telepathic abilities, and noticing how (s)he can actually control people. Unlike every other story in the world, she is trying to use those abilities to prevent a nuclear war from happening… only to realize towards the end that there is somebody else who is better in mind control, and instigates the war for his benefit

        • Meadows
        • 7 years ago

        *cough* X-Men First Class *cough*

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          I know.. so many good scifi stories are already written.

          (That was my favorite in the X-Men series, btw)

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 7 years ago

      Take the story of Yojimbo and put it in a space opera setting.

      • mutarasector
      • 7 years ago

      I’d like to see a new TV series based on the ‘Flint’ character from the classic Star Trek series episode “Requiem For Methuselah”. Roddenberry’s plan for the episode was originally it was supposed to be a pilot for a Trek spin-off series. Another episode he wanted to do this with was “Assignment: Earth” where the Enterprise intentionally goes back in time via the old sling-shot around the sun maneuver, ends up in Earth orbit in 1969, and intercepts an intragalactic transporter beam beaming a character known simply as ‘Gary 7’.

      I’ve always found the ‘Flint’ episode an interesting concept for a series, and even worked up a rather short treatment of my own for it. Basically, it’s Highlander meets James Bond(or another Roger Moore character ”The Saint’), but is set in canvas of the Star Trek Universe. The basic conflict element of the series would be an ongoing conflict between the immortal Flint character and a rogue shadow organization known as Section 31 (originally introduced in ST:DS9), and during one of Flint’s previous lives/aliases, he unwittngly has a hand in actually creating).

      I also had the idea of weaving a story around Flint and Gary 7. The series concept has so much potential to do stories in the Star Trek Universe, but without being Starfleet-centric, or always tied to a specific Starship or Space Station. Furthermore, the canvas broadens the Star Trek universe accross the entire Human history as several of Flint’s previous lives/aliases are discovered by Spock as Flint actually having been famous historical figures such as Alexander The Great, Brahms, etc. Not only a great canvas to paint stories on, but loads of paint colors with historical characters.

      Another idea I have is to do a crossover story between Star Trek and Stargate SG-1 series. I think I’ve found a rather nice way to ties them both together beautifully.

      EDIT:

      I forgot to mention one particular little difficulty I did run across with my crossover concept between Trek and Stargate is Stargate’s 200th episode where one part of the episode was a parody of Star Trek. It was rather humorous the way they did it, especially the parody of “Farscape” as well.

      • Voldenuit
      • 7 years ago

      Write a proper ending for Stargate: Universe?

      Please?

      Pretty Please?

        • mutarasector
        • 7 years ago

        I had a difficult time getting into SG:U. Too slow moving story arcs <shrug>… Although, I’ll give it this much – it was closer to being more like Roddenberry’s ‘Wagon Train To The Stars’ and Horatio Hornblower than any Trek series was. I’ve always loved the way they fleshed out a grand unified religion theory on which to base the whole series. What does kind of irk me, however, was how the Stargate series basically ripped off just about every technological vehicle it had from the Trek universe. (But then Trek ripped off Dr. Who’s ‘Cybermen’ with the ‘Borg’). I mean the G’uald snakes were obviously borrowed from Star Trek’s ‘Trill’ species, The Stargate itself is borrowed from either the Iconian gate Picard discovered, or even further back than that, the classic Trek series episode “City on the Edge of Forever” and the ‘Guardian of Forever’ portal. Stargate’s ‘Replicators’ were a clear rip off of the Borg nanobots, and SG’s ‘ring’ transporters and Asgard transporter beam were merely cosmetically redressed transporters.

      • JohnC
      • 7 years ago

      Write something about “Massively Multiplayer Online Virtual Reality”, there’s a serious lack of good novels dedicated to this topic (and yes, I’ve already read and greatly enjoyed “Ready Player One”).

      • sunner
      • 7 years ago

      I’m planning to write a science fiction novel. Any ideas?

      Congrats. Thats a worthy project.
      Maybe you’d be interested in developing your Sci-Fi novel on this.
      You could turn it into a killer Sci-Fi story involving time travel both ways.
      I heard 2 strange stories, alleged to be true….

      About a 100-150yrs ago in South America’s endless Amazon Jungle, the various tribes in different locations said there were giant Anaconda snakes in the remotest parts, and they swam the mighty Amazon River, occasionaly coming down to human habitations. But no War party dared follow them when they left. The natives said the monster snakes inhabited the country “way up North but we no go there”.

      Story#1….
      A steampowered Paddlewheel Ferry boat of about 150 Tons was passed one night on the Amazon River, by a giant snake so huge the Ferry “rocked from the waves” it created. The night crew was terrified, but the giant thing, its head higher than the ship’s bridge just ignored them and passed upriver and was gone. They guessed the sukka had to be hundreds of feet long.
      Imagine that thing loose in a modern countryside and reproducing. And what other things from prehistory might live in the thousands of sq. mi. of remote Amazon interior where even natives were afraid to go.

      • lilbuddhaman
      • 7 years ago

      Rewrite the SW prequels.

      • Flatland_Spider
      • 7 years ago

      In the future they’ve found a way to “dual boot” humans. When people think they are sleeping, they are actually being someone else. One guy meets a girl on a Internet forum without realizing it’s his alter ego. He tries to find the girl, and he finally realizes it’s himself.

      Ultimately it would be a cautionary tale about self-obsession and egotism with social commentary about how we are in a caustic feedback loop of information (garbage in, garbage out).

      Hmmm… That’s kind of like Fight Club.

      Just riff on Milton’s Paradise Lost. That is just a classic work of literature.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      you could write one about a guy who runs a sweatshop, and then finds out that he has super powers, and as such, becomes a king.

    • oldDummy
    • 7 years ago

    Personal observations, thoughts:
    This has got to be one of the most dishonest elections …ever.
    Is business that corrupt that king rat can claw his way to the top unencumbered with truth?
    Being born on third base doesn’t constitute a triple.
    How can loyalty be expected or experienced if all that binds is fear tinged with lies?
    Our government let us down by not protecting we the people from institutions.
    Corporations are not people.

    EDIT: 1- added “s” to election, 2- added EDIT

      • Ari Atari
      • 7 years ago

      I used to be a pessimist like you, then I watched My Little Pony and everything changed.

      Yes, the government and everything surrounding it has major problems right now. If they are to be changed, we as a people must stand together to fight against it.

      Educate people on why the government is so bad and why they need to change it. Putting the effort into making it dead stupid easy for people to follow you will help them follow.

      I know this isn’t possible for everyone, myself I can’t make a good argument for which cereal to eat for breakfast, but I’m sure something can be done.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        That first sentence is quote of the year.

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          Yes it is. I just watched some MLP today.. it really brightens your day. Even the clouds went away – it’s sunny now!

      • oldog
      • 7 years ago

      I take this to mean you would rather have someone who was a community organizer manage your $3.5 trillion organization than someone who has run a $4 billion asset management fund.

      I beg to differ.

      But I will say that the Prez is definitely cuter.

        • oldDummy
        • 7 years ago

        ha, you must like foreigners.

        Business people make poor POTUS’s, especially during a depression. History tells us this.

        Only one candidate has not lied over and over again. Integrity must count for something. That being said; In our country today little is gained or lost to everyday people due to who wins this election.
        Only the moneyed elite stand to gain many billions of dollars depending on who triumphs. This is a cause for concern in and of itself but is a symptom not the actual malady.

      • mutarasector
      • 7 years ago

      “Our government let us down by not protecting we the people from institutions.”

      And just who protects us from our own government? It sure as hell isn’t the SCOTUS or the Constitution any longer….

      “Corporations are not people.”

      Then neither are labor unions, particularly public sector unions.

        • oldDummy
        • 7 years ago

        1- Agreed. Our government has morphed into a tool for the highest bidder. Major systemic problems have evolved from this.

        2- Mostly agree. See #1

      • chuckula
      • 7 years ago

      I am intrigued by your copied & pasted clichés and would like to subscribe to your newsletter for my bird’s cage.

      Why are you so against Obama BTW? (since your rants are all obviously applicable to him)

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      Who would want to expose the Ugly Truth, when you could talk about the Beautiful Lie?

      Brought to you by Your Supreme Court.

        • oldDummy
        • 7 years ago

        One of our justices should be in prison for the way he treated his female workers.
        Now he decides what is right or wrong; Whatever.
        SCOTUS was the everyday persons last line of defense and it has been breached.

          • Ragnar Dan
          • 7 years ago

          Clinton was a president, and history’s worst traitor while there. Not a Supreme. Also molested at least several dozen young teenage girls with his brother and the use of drugs as AR governor, on account of being shortchanged one assumes.

          If you mean the disproven slander of Clarence Thomas, get your facts straight before you libel someone, worm.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            Fine example of Republican fantasies. Good job.

            • oldDummy
            • 7 years ago

            “Clinton was a president, and history’s worst traitor while there. Not a Supreme. Also molested at least several dozen young teenage girls with his brother and the use of drugs as AR governor, on account of being shortchanged one assumes.”

            “….get your facts straight before you libel someone, worm.”

            How quaint: a proven idiot in less than a page.
            Have a good day.

    • brucethemoose
    • 7 years ago

    How about revisiting some previous “rumor” articles?

    Almost spot on:
    [url<]https://techreport.com/news/13587/ultraportable-mac-notebook-coming-in-january[/url<] [url<]https://techreport.com/news/14592/rumor-get-ready-for-12-core-opterons[/url<] Sorta close. [url<]https://techreport.com/news/15177/macbook-touch-to-merge-macbook-iphone-concepts[/url<] Nope. [url<]https://techreport.com/news/14000/rumor-mill-abuzz-with-amd-ibm-merger-partnership-talk[/url<] [url<]https://techreport.com/news/15529/updated-could-google-purchase-valve[/url<]

    • Trident Troll
    • 7 years ago

    Maple is the most pretentious of woods.

      • UberGerbil
      • 7 years ago

      But its sap is the tastiest.

      And I think mahogany or teak, especially in non-maritime contexts, beats it on pretentiousnes.

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        Mahogany is a “poor mans” luxury wood. Teak with a nice Scandinavian oil job is by far my favorite (which would explain the home decor).

        Teak is nearly 4x the price of mahogany with the same grades. Maple is pretty cheap too. Then you have Satin and Black Walnut that is nearly as expensive as Teak.

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          So, are you saying “luxury” in wood is determined entirely by its price?

          I’ll sell you the most luxurious wood you’ve ever seen: my fig tree from the back yard. Only $100k per cubic foot.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            It’s not solely price but also the grain and oil and other qualities of the wood. Mahogany is a fairly “course” hardwood. It doesn’t weather well and unless varnished requires tons of maintenance.

            Disclaimer: Father was an IA teacher and we built hundreds of fine custom cupboards and cabinets for people in our “off work” hours.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            You must know way more about wood than I do.. could you please explain to me what are the most important characteristics of wood, in terms of how they affect the lifetime, durability, strength or other practical measures of quality for wood products?

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            I only know that mahogany is cheap because Epiphone uses it in their lower-tier Les Pauls. And I’m all like “the pickups are magnets, the wood doesn’t really affect the tone, right?”

            • Flatland_Spider
            • 7 years ago

            I’m a drummer, so the wood does matter to me. Is it different guitarists?

            Mahogany has a bassier sound then Maple or Birch, in drums.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            It’s a big deal in acoustic guitars to be sure, but in electrics there are two schools of thought where it matters a ton or it matters so little as to not at all. I can’t tell a difference and there has been no scientific study that I know of where people who claim to know the difference could actually tell a difference.

            • just brew it!
            • 7 years ago

            Seems to me that even an electric guitar can be affected somewhat by the physical properties of the wood. The wood has an effect on how the strings (and pickups!) vibrate in response to the strings being plucked/strummed. At the very least, I would expect a heavier/stiffer wood to result in longer sustain.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            In terms of maintaining the resonance, I agree – if the wood is resonant that would help sustain tone. But from what I’ve read the timbre isn’t affected much if at all. There’s a niche of bang/buck enthusiasts dedicated to buying the cheapest guitars they can and replacing the pickups and wiring with good quality stuff, and it sounds fantastic.

            Me, I’m just happy with my made-in-Mexico Telecaster.

            • mutarasector
            • 7 years ago

            Everybody uses Mahogany in guitars, and not just in cheaper guitars either. Not everyone uses the rarer tonewoods (because of politics). And yes, different woods definitely affect tone.

            • mutarasector
            • 7 years ago

            Ask Gibson guitars about how the socialist leaning Obummer boys seem to think it’s important enough to confiscate…

            • Ragnar Dan
            • 7 years ago

            As you can see, my evaluation below is will illustrated. Desire for value without wanting to offer value in return. Yeesh.

      • chuckula
      • 7 years ago

      “There is unrest in the forest,
      There is Trouble with the Trees,
      For the Maples want for Sunlight,
      And the Oaks Ignore their Pleas”

      • Flatland_Spider
      • 7 years ago

      It has my favorite EQ out of all the woods used to make drum shells. I would like to try some mahogany toms and a bass drum, but the last I heard, it was getting scarce.

    • sweatshopking
    • 7 years ago

    who would win an arm wrestle? me or l33t??

      • Deanjo
      • 7 years ago

      Justin Bieber

      • atryus28
      • 7 years ago

      Your mom!

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      You, based solely on your handles. You’re a king! He is but a lowly gamer computer nerd which implies zero muscle. You could have any of your royal subjects take your place, assuming they’re 8-year-olds from Malawi.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        Well said!

      • mutarasector
      • 7 years ago

      Honey Boo Boo…

    • codedivine
    • 7 years ago

    Why does Google not allow installation of userscripts.org scripts directly from the website in Chrome even though technically they are compatible?

    • Ari Atari
    • 7 years ago

    Hmm… a topic… If you were making a game, how would you go about selling it? Like would you use the “new” Free to Play way by giving the game away but charging for extras, or would you try the old fashion method and just sell it for some price? Would you do DLC?

    Me, I think I’d find someway to do Free to Play like Team Fortress 2. Giving randomly dropped items and selling any specific item. Don’t know what I’d do for extra content though. You’ve got to pay the developers somehow… Maybe some sort of kickstarter paid DLC.

      • KeillRandor
      • 7 years ago

      Well – my *main* game idea is pretty specific in how it works and functions, which also affects how it would be sold/licensed (since it’s an MMORPG).

      Think of a fairly typical ‘RPG’ system – but with the experience points players earn for their character being able to be DIRECTLY spent on improving the character (though still limited and linked with the characters overall level for what can be improved and by how much/far) – (no having to wait a full level to develop anything etc. – (was it Dungeon Lords that worked in a similar way? I can’t remember…)) (Note: my game idea is really old, and pre-dates Dungeon Lords – I came up with it after playing Diablo II then Everquest (1).)

      There are three main ‘versions’ of the game:

      The free version simply develops the character on rails, depending how the game is played – i.e. the more you do something, the better the character gets at it – what I would call ‘adventure’ mode, since, IMO, it’s not an ‘RPG’ – (it’s an adventure game with ‘RPG’ elements) – and there’s no way this particular version can be considered to have the same gameplay as the the other two versions, which would be considered to be ‘RPG’s’. In this version all experience points would be automatically allocated based on the character’s skills that are being used, with no manual input except in the basic gameplay – (action adventure, probably, though it doesn’t have to be).

      The next (balanced mode) version would allow the player to manually allocate half of the experience points earned – this would be paid for a month at a time.

      The full (advanced) version would force the player to manually allocate all experience points earned – and is what I would consider to be a ‘proper’ ‘RPG’. This would also be paid for, for a small amount more than the ‘balanced’ version (though not too much).

      Any time a person stops paying, it reverts to the basic version – (i.e. changes from manual to automatic character (gameplay) development).

      Note: I consider the term ‘RPG’ itself to be a really big problem for this gameplay mechanic, since it has nothing to do with ‘role-playing’ at all. (This type of game mechanic can be used with almost any type of basic gameplay, from FPS’s to racing games etc., which shouldn’t be too surprising since that’s what we’re seeing with such systems anyway, just not in this particular manner).

      And since both systems are still considered to be the same type of game at this time, however, (regardless of it’s label), we have problems – (though if people had the two different types of systems within the same game, maybe they’ll realise they’re actually quite different? Different enough to be defined and labelled as two different types of game? I.e. the difference between an action adventure game with ‘RPG’ elements, and an ‘RPG’ with action adventure (basic) gameplay).

      Whether or not such a type of game would make enough money to be profitable – I don’t know…

      To be honest, I’m surprised I haven’t seen such a system already, but then it seems not many people are viewing ‘RPG’s’ in such a manner?

    • Deanjo
    • 7 years ago

    Retired today! w00t!

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      Congrats!

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        Thanks, and tomorrow… the big 4-0….

          • codedivine
          • 7 years ago

          In which base? Hexadecimal?

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            Hell in hex I’m only 28. Sadly, according to science, even at that age I’m well past my sexual peak.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 7 years ago

          Well happy birthday – what did you retire from?

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            Working as a software engineer although through out the years I’ve done many things many at the same time. Served my country in the airforce, ran a few retail stores (all in the computer field), installed and build custom home theaters and car audio systems, worked in fibreglass building and designing boats and other products, IT consulted, cabinetry building, tax preparation, accounting, welder, construction labourer, and farm.

            Farming I will still do, since it is a grain only farm now days and I will never be cured of the itch to go seeding or harvesting and I’ll be building the new house out there starting next spring.

      • oldDummy
      • 7 years ago

      Great Stuff.
      Keep Busy.
      Good Luck.

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        Got lots to do. Finally got time to do all those personal coding projects I’ve been meaning to do or finish.

      • chuckula
      • 7 years ago

      Congratulations! You have finally earned the right to do this: [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NelBNtNm8l0[/url<]

        • shaq_mobile
        • 7 years ago

        excellent.

      • dmjifn
      • 7 years ago

      That’s pretty awesome. I guess you now have plenty of time to devote to your new [url=https://techreport.com/news/23735/interested-in-writing-for-tr<]TR column[/url<]? 🙂

      • oldog
      • 7 years ago

      I too am retired. I recall a patient of mine who, when asked what she did in her retirement, said: “Any damn thing I please”.

      Have fun.

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      You know, maybe we should talk about if you deserve to be retired. Have you contributed enough to the common good? Or are you retiring solely on the back of your lucky bet with dollar?

      Moving dollars around to “make” money doesn’t really earn you the ‘right’ to retire in my book. Of course, if you plan to do something good with your millions, then I will shake your hand and wish you a fulfilling future.

        • chuckula
        • 7 years ago

        I think what Neely is trying to say here is: “Can I have some?”

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          I admit that – I would love having the freedom from work to pursue other things.

          But I’m serious about the “deserving to retire” thingy in a way. I’ve been thinking about what is one’s purpose in life. The chase for “stuff” is interesting and appealing, but when I get stuff, the joy doesn’t last long, especially when I see a disturbing documentary or a movie (like “Machine Gun Preacher”).

          What gives me the right to drive a fast car that burns a ton of diesel to get to an air conditioned home, when kids around the world are dying because they don’t have food? Then I take a look at Zeitgeist The Movie, and it really hits home how messed up things are in this world, and how they could (should?) be..

          For a long time I’ve had zero respect towards bankers, investors, wall street jockeys and anyone else I consider not doing anything useful or productive. But then I look at myself, my income, and wonder why I deserve the comfort I have when the guy cleaning the toilet I use at work doesn’t have it. I deserve it more than the bankers deserve theirs, but there are others who deserve it way more.

          But I know I can’t do much alone – to get a real change going, there needs to be a major attitude change in the whole society. I doubt it can happen in this “individualistic” greed-based society that is the USA, though, and that’s why I do nothing.

          That’s also why people like SSK are my heroes.

          So, Deanjo – please, tell me that you’ll do something good during your retirement.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]So, Deanjo - please, tell me that you'll do something good during your retirement.[/quote<] The same thing I have done all along. Take care of family, continue my charity work through the service clubs, continue teaching "Computers for the Paranoid" and working with Computers for Kids and enjoying the fruits of my years of labour.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            That sounds good.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<] That's also why people like SSK are my heroes.[/quote<] I don't think you're being sarcastic, and i have to ton of respect for you, so i take that as a heck of a compliment, though i don't think i deserve it. great post, btw. but "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has." - Margaret Mead Be a force of good in the world. Shout for justice from the roof tops. Never give, nor take offense, and we'll have this world sorted out before long! I have lots of love for you guys. The last few years have been one heck of a good time.

            • Geistbar
            • 7 years ago

            I agree with your sentiment, though I lack the optimism. I think many people share my pessimism, just the issue is that they take it as a reason to give up instead of to try harder.

            • just brew it!
            • 7 years ago

            Bankers and other denizens of Wall Street aren’t completely useless. The problem is that they’ve lost sight of their original purpose and now spend most of their effort making money for themselves instead of providing useful services for anyone outside their circle. [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_frequency_trading<]HFT[/url<] is a perfect example of this.

            • juampa_valve_rde
            • 7 years ago

            For the a-holes that give a -1 to this comment, all of you deserve to live in the third world, the world who is paying your bills with their sweat and blood amongst other things. I agree with you this time Neely.

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        Newsflash, my investment had next to nothing to do with my ability to retire. Those are just the “gravy”. Worked two full time jobs for most of my life and managed a farm. It’s called money management and working your ass off for what you want and not trying to blame others for misfortunes.

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          Did you have people working for you at your farm? Did they work as hard as you? Did they get proportionally good compensation? Or did you get way more because you were the “manager”?

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            Had 3 people working on my farm usually , me, myself, and I. When it came to harvest or seeding I would hire another person to help out for those periods. Usually a neighbor, my Uncle, or my cousin that could use the extra money. They were more then fairly compensated. To top it off, it isn’t only me that reaps the benefits of the farm. My two sisters are also equal share holders (family farm purchased from our parents) in it although they do not do much other then come out a weekend or two a year to visit (and maybe help paint a building or two when needed).

            The newest piece of equipment on my farm is a 1976 IH 1066 tractor. The combine is a year older. During the 80’s when the times were good, a lot of the neighbors stupidly got into buying new equipment that they did not need just to basically one up each other. In the 90’s when times got tough those payments caught up with them and many had to declare bankruptcy. A lot of them blamed the banks for giving them the money in the first place. Meanwhile here I was, farming with my old but immaculately maintained 40 year old equipment that is likely to go for many many more years.

            • jihadjoe
            • 7 years ago

            I can smell the jelly from here.
            Can’t we just be happy that at least one of us is doing well?

          • Geistbar
          • 7 years ago

          Not to rain on your parade — an honest congrats on getting to enjoy an early retirement — but your success isn’t something that you can attribute solely to managing your money and working hard, as if it’s something that anyone could accomplish. I doubt that opportunity to manage the farm was presented to many people (did you own it? family, friends?), and generally such management offers an outsized reward on your time investment. Even having the opportunity to work two simultaneous full time jobs is not offered to many people; you have to live somewhere where there are two jobs compatible with your skill set in reasonably close proximity, work in a field that allows hours that are compatible with such, have bosses that are accommodating to any difficulties that might arise (e.g. if you have to work later at one place for whatever reason). You’d have to maintain some rather good health to keep up with that schedule too, and that’s more than just eating healthy and exercising; your genetics and childhood environment (both outside your control) will play a large factor, not to mention luck.

          I don’t doubt that you have worked very hard, but you shouldn’t be so foolish as to assume that others are only less successful than you because they’re too busy “blam[ing] others for their misfortunes”.

            • BIF
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]...but you shouldn't be so foolish as to assume that others are only less successful than you because they're too busy "blam[ing] others for their misfortunes". [/quote<] Actually, I see precisely that happening a lot. No assuming required. What is with all these posts telling him "you didn't build that!" Shame on every one of you!

            • Geistbar
            • 7 years ago

            Would you say that every single last person that isn’t able to retire at 40 is only held back by a lack of hard work and being too busy blaming others? I have no doubt that there are many people who could cross that success threshold with just working more and harder. We’re not talking about small subsets though, we’re speaking of [i<]everyone[/i<]. Do you honestly believe that everyone -- every last person -- who isn't well enough off to retire at 40 (or whatever) is held back solely by not having worked hard enough? [quote<]What is with all these posts telling him "you didn't build that!"[/quote<] People tend to attribute too much of their success and too little of their failure to themselves. Deanjo is doing just that, and it's a bad way to look at things -- causing a rather inappropriate bit of disdain for others that aren't as successful. As I said, multiple times, I do not doubt at all that he put in that very hard work to get there, and I do not begrudge his success; if all that was at issue was whether or not he worked hard and got success, then all would be dandy. However, you can't claim that the [i<]only[/i<] thing separating the successful from the less successful is hard work. I know and have known people who work 60+ hours a week at well paying, skilled jobs, and they'll never retire that early. I know other people who work at least just as hard at less skilled jobs, some of whom would have gotten more skilled jobs if not for bad luck (one man I recall got his life derailed after getting drafted for Vietnam and then becoming a POW). "Hard work" isn't the only thing separating the successful from the rest, and it's outright stupid to think it is.

            • BIF
            • 7 years ago

            Okay, I can see that you’re just going to keep adding ingredients and little anecdotes about how deanjo shouldn’t enjoy the results of his hard work because “this person working 60+ hours” and “that person who became a POW”, or “how dare you be happy when there are starving kids in Africa or people with cancer in the world”.

            None of this extra noise was part of the original issue. The guy just said he retired, woot! We should woot with him, not scold him.

            What the hell is the matter with us? Where is our empathy and human kindness? Can’t we just congratulate him and be done with it? Why does every bit of good news have to be countered with depressing thoughts?

            And the depressors keep insisting that their way of thinking is the right way; the “only” way. I reject that, and I think we really should stop focusing always on the negative. Sure, bad things happen in the world, but if your first thought upon hearing somebody’s good news is to say something depressing or negative, then maybe you should really think hard about your own self and how you might be subconsciously hurting your own life opportunities!

            • Geistbar
            • 7 years ago

            Either you need to improve your reading comprehension or you’re just really bad at attempting redirection during a discussion.
            [quote<]Okay, I can see that you're just going to keep adding ingredients and little anecdotes about how deanjo shouldn't enjoy the results of his hard work because "this person working 60+ hours" and "that person who became a POW", or "how dare you be happy when there are starving kids in Africa or people with cancer in the world". [/quote<] Can you find any instance of me saying he shouldn't enjoy it? Can you even find an instance where I didn't acknowledge that he worked hard to get what he has? I've repeatedly stated that I do not doubt his hard work at all. What I've said, from the very start, is that people with success like Deanjo are not separated from people without that same level of success solely by hard work. That would never had to come up at all, were it not for Deanjo's derision for those less successful and implications that the only thing holding them back is them blaming others, as in this quote: [quote<]It's called money management and working your ass off for what you want and not trying to blame others for misfortunes.[/quote<] [quote<]What the hell is the matter with us? Where is our empathy and human kindness? Can't we just congratulate him and be done with it? Why does every bit of good news have to be countered with depressing thoughts?[/quote<] Where is anybody doing this? My very first reply to him offered my congratulations. All I've been doing is saying that you don't get that successful solely off of hard work, and claiming otherwise (which you have implied) is stupid, foolishly egotistical, and just flat out incorrect. My mentioning of those people that I have is not to say "hey you should feel bad for these people" but to say "these people worked extremely hard too, so you can't dismiss those less successful than you as lazy whiners".

            • Bensam123
            • 7 years ago

            I think this is exactly what Neely was getting at, but wasn’t nearly as articulate with their wording.

            There isn’t simply a ‘working hard’ task in life to which everyone can fill the gauge and retire well off at 40.

            Capitalism is all about pushing those down around you in order to get on top of them. Others have more money to spend because there are those that are worse off then them.

        • oldog
        • 7 years ago

        Neely using your logic, someone that cleans toilets in the local pub hasn’t given enough for the “common good” to ever retire. I once believed that doing “important work” was the most important thing in life.

        I have changed my mind. All honest work is good and important work. We are all connected. The doctor needs someone to bag her groceries when she’s not performing open heart surgery. Neither is more important. Decent people deserve respect.

        They are compensated based on a perceived value to the public as represented by money. This is the absolute fairest way to determine value.

        My advice, retire when you damn well please and offer no apologies when you decide to write poetry that no one will likely ever read (personal anecdote).

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<]Neely using your logic, someone that cleans toilets in the local pub hasn’t given enough for the “common good” to ever retire[/quote<] How so? Cleaning folks are doing incredibly important work [quote<]The doctor needs someone to bag her groceries when she’s not performing open heart surgery. [b<]Neither is more important.[/b<] Decent people deserve respect. [/quote<] If they are equally important, how do you explain the [i<]massive[/i<] difference in "compensation"? [quote<]They are compensated based on a perceived value to the public as represented by money. This is the absolute fairest way to determine value. [/quote<] That's free market capitalism - not the "fairest way". That system is 'unstable' in the engineering/science sense of the word, and will result in all the "money" in the hands of the select few (in the purest sense, in the hand of one). That system doesn't assign any value to people in general - just what they can provide to the "system". The maxima of this system represent the largest amounts of "money" or rate of accumulation of "money" - whatever "money" may mean. That's the system where moving "money" around generates value. In what way, exactly? The stock market is a betting game, where those who bet better (and who have more "money" to bet) "make" more "money". None of that actually [b<]makes anything[/b<]. It's a distraction from actual work that generates something (be it manufacturing labor, scientific research, producing food from solar energy - you name it).

            • Xylker
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<] That's the system where moving "money" around generates value. In what way, exactly? The stock market is a betting game, where those who bet better (and who have more "money" to bet) "make" more "money". None of that actually makes anything. [/quote<] Wrong. Some number of businesses cannot exist without the capital input provided by going public. As such, the stock market does in fact make things. Sure, it is not a direct link, but without the stock market, the ability of the creator to buy tools (for instance) is diminished or impaired to the point of being uneconomical.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            That was the original idea for a stock market (or banking system), but what we have now is a severely deformed version of that. It doesn’t work now like it was supposed to. Now companies can’t get loans to fund “creation” because the system got screwed up by the speculation, greed and insanity.

            The act of “moving money” gets a disproportionate reward compared to the actual creation.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            Almost every industry is built on speculation. If you are a retailer, you are speculating what is going to be the hot product, if you are farmer, you are speculating what to grow and invest into the land to reap the the best rewards, etc.

            The only profession that doesn’t “supposedly” carry speculation is a fortune teller.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            I wouldn’t say all industries are built on speculation. Some are based on real human need, like farming. Speculating on what [i<]kind[/i<] of food will have most demand and highest profit margins may be part of it, but the basic idea is that people need food, and that's not speculation. Those who build houses do it mainly because people need roofs over their heads to protect them from rain, and walls around them to keep them warm. Speculating on where it makes sense to build and how big the houses should be may be part of it, but it's the need for shelter that this industry is built on. Computer industry was built on the need for more computational power for scientific research, industrial control and such. The recent speculation for what kind of computing devices people might [i<]want[/i<] (such as PCs, tablets, smartphones) and how to make high profits with these is now part of it, but the industry wasn't built on that. I'd argue that most industries are [i<]not[/i<] built on speculation.

          • Xylker
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<] All honest work is good and important work. We are all connected. [/quote<] I wish I could give 42 thumbs up...

          • shaq_mobile
          • 7 years ago

          yessss +1

        • mutarasector
        • 7 years ago

        Neely, I’m really trying to get my mind wrapped around your thinking here, but I have a fundamental problem with your premises “maybe [we] should talk about [if] deserve to be retired” and “contributed enough to the common good”, or even “lucky bet with dollar”.

        1> Who are “we” to determine one if one deserves to retire? This has a ring of highbrow elitism itself. What if one’s physical health demands retirement? Is not retirement then a genuine need that can only be individually determined?

        2> Just what constitutes “enough” and towards >what< common good? These are rather vague and nebulous terms which carry a seemingly weighty and morally absolutist imperative.

        3> Why is there an automatic presumption that a risk of capital loss which results in profit just a ‘lucky bet with a dollar’?

        ‘Moving dollars around’ requires considerably more work than you seem to be willing to acknowledge. To do so *intelligently* requires time, research, market knowledge in order to capitalize on the timing aspects of doing so. There are those of us who believe in the old axiom that ‘luck’ more often than not has little to do with anything other than when planning meets preparation. Both of these are just as much part of being ‘work’ as the guy that scrubs toilets for a living. There’s nothing wrong or immoral about maximizing one’s productivity from their own resources even if it means the toilet scrubber doesn’t get a raise…

          • Geistbar
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<]'Moving dollars around' requires considerably more work than you seem to be willing to acknowledge. To do so *intelligently* requires time, research, market knowledge in order to capitalize on the timing aspects of doing so.[/quote<] There's a saying that I'm fond of: "To turn $10,000 into $20,000 takes a lot of hard work, dedication, and isn't guaranteed. To turn $1,000,000 into $2,000,000 is inevitable." The general idea is that once you have a large enough amount of capital available to you, it no longer actually takes that much work or risk, comparable to your returns, to make it grow. [quote<]There are those of us who believe in the old axiom that 'luck' more often than not has little to do with anything other than when planning meets preparation.[/quote<] Luck plays a rather enormous part of the extent of an individuals success. I used him as an example earlier, but just look at Bill Gates. The deal that put Microsoft on the map and lead to Gates making his fortune was a deal with IBM to get MS-DOS on the IBM PC. They didn't go to Microsoft originally though, and Gates didn't know of the project before they approached him (so he couldn't have tried to convince them to choose him in the scenario of them never approaching him) -- they first went to [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gary_Kildall#IBM_dealings<]Gary Kildall[/url<]. It's not that implausible for them to have chosen his software instead, and then Gates would likely not have become the billionaire that he is today (he probably still would be rich, just not billionaire rich). Luck plays a huge part -- just it isn't the only part. Outside of some really extensive luck (e.g. being Sam Walton's child), all the luck in the world won't be enough to make someone successful -- they'll need to work hard, and smart, to capitalize on it. On the same flip side, all the hard and smart work in the world won't be enough to make someone successful either.

          • just brew it!
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<]'Moving dollars around' requires considerably more work than you seem to be willing to acknowledge. To do so *intelligently* requires time, research, market knowledge in order to capitalize on the timing aspects of doing so.[/quote<] I don't think he was trying to claim that it doesn't require intelligence or skill. The issue is that in many cases these days, it produces nothing of value -- no product, no service. It just exists for its own sake. Take my HFT example. It's just a high-stakes financial arms race for the already rich and powerful. HFT firms fight over who gets to put their server room physically closest to the exchange's servers (even microseconds count!), and churn the market with millions of trades a day, holding individual stocks for a few seconds at most. HFT activity currently accounts for most of the trading volume in the stock market. HFT proponents claim that they're performing a valuable service by "adding liquidity" to the market, but there's no way anyone other than the HFT traders themselves need liquidity on a microsecond time scale. What HFT effectively does is skim profits off the top of the stock market at everyone else's expense. And when the systems go haywire, you end up with messes like the "flash crash" which undermine confidence in the markets and cause collateral damage to legitimate investors.

            • shaq_mobile
            • 7 years ago

            hmmm i wish i understood this stuff better.

            • just brew it!
            • 7 years ago

            The more you understand it, the more it just “feels wrong”.

      • BIF
      • 7 years ago

      Way to go, you made it out alive and you can take care of yourself. That rocks.

      I’ve seen jobs kill people; some were my friends. So in my opinion, anybody who says you don’t deserve it doesn’t know a damned thing. You deserve it.

      And if you are like my friends who did make it over the razor wire alive, you will soon find out that you’ll be MORE BUSY than at any other time in your life. As long as you have your health, you’ll love every minute of it.

      Enjoy. But please, no thank you to cute cat videos; You Tube has too many already, and if you start posting those, we’ll have to ask you to go back to work. 😀

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        Thanks, yes I know all to well about the hazards of life and work. I’ve survived floods (1), fires (2), tornadoes (2). The last fire 5 years ago burnt nearly all my possessions and house and put me in the hospital with 3rd degree burns to the hands (which really sucks by the way trying to accomplish anything in the bathroom when you have two huge gauze mitts covering your hands). Thankfully, I had a plastic surgeon (a boob man none the less) that was putting in his emergency room hours that day and he took me on as a patient. He did an awesome job of taking care of my hands and there is nearly no visible scarring anymore. I’m also grateful that when he took off the bandages eventually that I didn’t see a nipple. ;D

          • trackerben
          • 7 years ago

          I’ve had my share of close calls but what you’ve been through sounds pretty bad, you have my sympathies. Am glad you’ve made it to this day with apparently less damage to your character than your limbs. I recently suffered small 3rd degree burns to my hand while cooking, and the strirring pain such burns bring is amazingly awful.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            Not looking for sympathy at all, such is life. A person can’t dwell on the past and move forward. The phrase “S**t happens, learn and move on with your life” couldn’t be any truer because when it all comes down to it, nothing can change the past.

      • Arclight
      • 7 years ago

      Watch out i heard they put something in the pension money…..

      • trackerben
      • 7 years ago

      With all the best. And give thanks for what you have.

        • Meadows
        • 7 years ago

        To whom? He worked for it.

          • Geistbar
          • 7 years ago

          To the people, system, and opportunities that enabled him to do that work and get rewarded for it in the first place? Nobody is an island. You have to work hard to get your success — most successful people have worked very hard to get there — but there are a lot of people who work just as hard who don’t get that success. It’s foolish to assume that you succeed [i<]only[/i<] off of your hard work; that hard work is a necessary component, but it's not the only such component.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            Oh hard work is not the only way to achieve success, nor is it the only requirement to achieve it but nobody succeeds by trying to lay blame on others for lack of success. Ultimately it is the individual that decides what avenue to take to achieve that success and if something impedes that success, replan and reroute to get to that goal. Don’t depend on others to make your life better because if you do, you are going to be that much more disappointed and further away from your goals.

            • Geistbar
            • 7 years ago

            I’m glad you agree, and perhaps it’s just the way you phrased it or the way I interpreted it, but your earlier statement (“newsflash […]”) seemed to indicate that you believed that the only reason others weren’t as successful was because they traded hard work for blaming others. I think the important thing to realize is that it’s not just overcoming people that are obstacles — a lot of success isn’t from overcoming obstacles, but through maximizing the opportunities granted to you, and getting those opportunities in the first place. Such as the farm you mentioned — it’s not hard to imagine someone in a similar position to you not getting that opportunity to manage it, and that’s not an obstacle to overcome so much as just how things worked out.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            The farm is not a huge money maker, never has been. For the most part it pays for itself and not much more. It would be hard for one person to make a living off of it with it being the sole source of income. It’s farmed more for the love of farming, the lifestyle, and keeping the land in the family and maintaining the heritage.

            • Geistbar
            • 7 years ago

            Well you mentioned the farm amongst the money makers instead of the investments, so I was only basing it off of what you said. Even then, having a hobby that pays for itself plus maybe a little bit extra on top is still an opportunity. And then there’s going into how you got the farm — “keeping the land in the family” would seem to indicate that you inherited it, and if so that’s a huge opportunity that most people don’t get.

            Maybe a good example point for what I’m going for would be to look at Bill Gates. He worked really hard, and is a very bright person, so in the sense of having worked for his money, he earned it. On the flip side, he had quite a few special opportunities available to him: he was starting his career at just the right time due to the growth of the computer industry, and he managed to convince IBM to use his OS. He probably still would have been a wealthy individual no matter what due to his intelligence, hard work, and good financial starting point, but he had a good number of opportunities (that he worked quite hard to make work in his favor!) that enabled him to become one of — and for a time, the — wealthiest individuals alive.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]Well you mentioned the farm amongst the money makers instead of the investments, so I was only basing it off of what you said.[/quote<] No I mentioned the farm as to being able to still manage time for it. I never said it was a reason that provided for my retirement. [quote<] "keeping the land in the family" would seem to indicate that you inherited it[/quote<] No it was purchased by me and my two siblings from our parents, just like how my parents bought it from my grandparents. We don't want to see the land get sold and taken over by corporate farmers who rape and pillage the land. [quote<] On the flip side, he had quite a few special opportunities available to him: he was starting his career at just the right time due to the growth of the computer industry, and he managed to convince IBM to use his OS. He probably still would have been a wealthy individual no matter what due to his intelligence, hard work, and good financial starting point, but he had a good number of opportunities (that he worked quite hard to make work in his favor!) that enabled him to become one of -- and for a time, the -- wealthiest individuals alive. [/quote<] And Bill made all those opportunities happen, he was the one that did all the leg work. Gates, Jobs, and Woz virtually created the industry that nobody had interest in pursuing. They were not given the market, they created it.

            • Geistbar
            • 7 years ago

            Your original phrasing most definitely does indicate it was of financial help:
            [quote<]Newsflash, my investment had next to nothing to do with my ability to retire. Those are just the "gravy". Worked two full time jobs for most of my life and managed a farm.[/quote<] It is logically joined with the jobs as your counterpoint to the investments. Maybe you didn't intend it to come across that way, but the way you worded it does indicate that. [quote<]And Bill made all those opportunities happen, he was the one that did all the leg work. Gates, Jobs, and Woz virtually created the industry that nobody had interest in pursuing. They were not given the market, they created it.[/quote<] I don't think you understand what I'm saying. He made those opportunities [i<]work[/i<] for him -- it was his work that made those opportunities amount to what they did. But those were opportunities that other extremely hard working people didn't have. If Gates was just 10 years older or younger, he wouldn't have been able to start his business at just the right time: that was a factor 100% outside of his control. His opportunity with IBM was provided by them, not by him -- they approached him about a project that he couldn't have known about otherwise. They could easily have decided to approach someone else, and instead we'd be talking about [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Paterson<]Tim Paterson[/url<] making his billions in Gates' place. He didn't create those opportunities, he "merely" worked to make them work out for him. EDIT: Or maybe [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gary_Kildall<]Gary Kildall[/url<]. Or [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ROM-DOS#ROM-DOS<]Roy Sherrill[/url<]. Or...

            • BIF
            • 7 years ago

            As each of us comes into this world, we plays the hand we’re dealt with.

            As it was designed, and as it should be.

            • Geistbar
            • 7 years ago

            By your own logic there, nobody has earned anything — it was all “designed” for them in advance. You’re rather logically inconsistent.

          • BIF
          • 7 years ago

          I suggest giving thanks to God. But it’s only a suggestion…

            • Meadows
            • 7 years ago

            Thought so. Hence my caustic, civilised remark.

            • dmjifn
            • 7 years ago

            “I am Meadows’s caustic, civilised remark” would make a good forum sig. Someone should snatch that up!

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            Hmm.. I gotta watch Fight Club again. It’s been over a year since the last time

          • trackerben
          • 7 years ago

          To whom? To whomever he believes has fathered his success and brought worth in his eyes. Like most I thank my natural parents and remember those who taught me well. But in newfound faith I further and firstly thank the God of my Christ for all he has said and done that we don’t have to.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            Who do I thank? My parents who taught me the value of money, the rewards of hard work, the importance of family, moral values, and the knowledge that it is up to the individual to decide their own fate.

            • trackerben
            • 7 years ago

            I couldn’t have said it better. In what matters, the choice is ours alone.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            Sounds like they also gave you a share of the farm… something most people won’t get from their parents. Is your retirement not largely because of that?

            My parents were/are poor. I will never inherit anything worth much monetarily. It could easily be argued that whatever I have, I truly deserve. But I disagree; my success should be attributed to the educational policies of Finland. I got a good education for free – good enough that it got me a free ride to a grad school in one of the top universities in the US, which scored me a high paying job.

            Most people in the world, or even in the USA don’t get such opportunities.

            • dmjifn
            • 7 years ago

            So now I’m wondering if all this railing on Deanjo about deservedness is really about your feelings of guilt.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            I do have feelings of guilt. But I have those feelings because I think some people in our westernized society tend have more than they deserve (and I happened to become one of them). That opinion is the reason I am wondering about Deanjo (or any other person) “deserving” to retire at 40 – not the guilt itself.

            • dmjifn
            • 7 years ago

            OK. On this topic, I am sincerely curious – what do you suppose people “deserve”? Also, I’m making an assumption that, if you view such individuals as having more than they deserve, it’s at least in part due to comparing with people who have less than they deserve. How do you arrive at your determination of what people deserve?
            I’ve thought about this and I don’t have a very good answer for this personally.

            • Geistbar
            • 7 years ago

            I’m not Neely, but since I harbor similar thoughts, I’ll offer my shot at this. I don’t know if this is the same meaning as Neely intended of course, I’m not psychic.

            I think deserve in this usage is not referring to a specific quantity of opportunities, material wealth, etc. — I think it’s referring to quality of living relative to others. People born in developed countries don’t “deserve” to have the vastly superior quality of life that they have compared to people living in other parts of the world (compare the life of a peasant in North Korea to members of the [url=http://articles.latimes.com/2012/jul/18/business/la-fi-mo-walmart-heirs-20120718<]Walton family[/url<]), when the only real reason for those differences is where you were born and who your parents were. I was born in and live in the US, and I don't deserve the markedly superior quality of life that has given me over the average person living in, say, Liberia (where [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_percentage_of_population_living_in_poverty<]95% of the population[/url<] lives on less than $2 PPP/day ). I'd say that everybody deserves to have that great starting position for quality of life, but nobody deserves to have such a vastly superior starting position to others.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            i think this is what Neely was getting at. the belief that you deserve something based upon a random birth. When i was in malawi, running the sweatshop, i had people that worked harder than i’ve ever seen a north american work. i’m sure a north american somewhere works as hard, but i’d honestly be surprised. we’re talking finishing a shift, then spending the night in the hospital with cerebral malaria, then back at work the next day. people almost dying, literally, at work, but sticking it through. hard work is important, even necessary for society to grow, and we should all focus on things that profit us, and humanity. that doesn’t mean what i do happens in a vacuum.

            • just brew it!
            • 7 years ago

            That’s the other extreme though. Police, firefighters, military volunteers? They signed up for potentially life-threatening duty to provide an essential service, and they have my gratitude. But a shift worker in a factory? Nobody should feel compelled to do that to the brink of death; other peoples’ lives are not at stake. A society that implicitly condones that sort of thing is not a humane society.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            I don’t disagree. I’m merely saying that everything has context, and hard work alone doesn’t get you retired at 40 in a vacuum.

            • just brew it!
            • 7 years ago

            I don’t disagree with that either. *Nothing* occurs in a vacuum unless you’re a hermit living out in the wilderness. But for a smart person with modest needs, no dependents, a strong work ethic, and a bit of luck, I think retiring at 40 is not an unreasonable goal (and there’s really no need to feel guilty about it).

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            I never said he should feel guilty. otherwise, i think you’re right.

            • just brew it!
            • 7 years ago

            The “guilt” thing was actually a reference to NeelyCam’s post (#143).

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            In neely’s case, it’s guilt from compassion. I would agree with you that as long as you’re responsible, just, and doing what you think is right, you shouldn’t feel guilty. In neely’s case, he seems to think he has a greater responsibility to society and mankind. I don’t think that’s wrong, i just think it varies depending on the individual.

            • just brew it!
            • 7 years ago

            Agreed. And assuming that compassion leads him to help those less fortunate in some way, all the better. I was just noting that being successful is not something a person should be ashamed of or beat themselves up over.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            <3

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            It’s interesting to see how I was mostly at + over the weekend, but as soon as Monday hits and the greedballs return home from their Hamptons mansions, downthumbs start raining. They decided to downthumb everything I said, regardless what it was

            Good to see that NeelyCam Hateclub is alive and well. We’ll have some good times ahead! <3

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            I’d say don’t take it personally, but it likely is. Don’t worry about it though. I get lots of – too, no matter what I say. The reality is that this isn’t really an environment to discuss such matters, even though we do it periodically. This site is good for “AMD IS BETTER”, “NO INTEL IS BETTER” , but for deeper discussions on things that aren’t of that nature, this medium, and group often fails. I include myself in that. If you’re going to discuss such things, you have to take ego out, and consults in a spirit of unity and focus on the BEST outcome. But that’s a hard thing to do when we can’t even agree on what the best outcome is.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            Don’t worry – I don’t take it personally. I just though it was interested how the swing from + to – happened.

            I’m profiling my “fans” – soon I have a stereotype all figured out.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]But that's a hard thing to do when we can't even agree on what the best outcome is.[/quote<] If everyone agreed on that, then I'm not sure there would be much room for discussion... and that's the fun part!

            • trackerben
            • 7 years ago

            Being successful is not something a person should be ashamed of, though he is better for being thankful for it. Feeling guilt about others less fortunate in life is common but is fruitless absent compassion for their travails, which in turn is fruitless absent intent and action towards providing for those in need.

            Guilt is a remedy with little effect on others.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            only if it stays as guilt. many people turn that guilt into a impetus for change. it’s not always fruitless.

            • trackerben
            • 7 years ago

            Yes, as guilt alone is only best at presenting a posture of impeccability. The goodness in a person blooms when his guilt turns compassionate, spurring him to act with consideration and kindness for those around him. This goes beyond corresponding with one’s self-image which is what guilt entails.

            Getting to know your neighbors and doing what you can for those in need reflects the highest love, and our conviction here not only demonstrates greatly that we each can be responsive. It also teaches those whom we’ve helped to provide virtuously for others in turn, bringing the redeeming country where those wracked with guilt may find peace.

            • Deanjo
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]Sounds like they also gave you a share of the farm...[/quote<] No, us kids bought it from our parents (and at market value), just as how our parents bought it from theirs. If you are looking for a silver spoon, there is none. It's not a huge farm, just a section.

      • dpaus
      • 7 years ago

      Congratulations! Now you’ll have time to meet for a coffee on my next trip out there (likely mid-November)

        • BIF
        • 7 years ago

        I’m telling you, retirement is a busy time for a lot of people. He’ll probably be building a house, so you’ll have to meet him at the work site. Bring the coffee in a Stanley. And bring tools; nobody gets to sit down while there’s work to do. 😀

      • lilbuddhaman
      • 7 years ago

      very jealous

      • Ragnar Dan
      • 7 years ago

      Congratulations, and don’t let the Luddite parasite(s) trouble you. Unthinking fools who imagine substituting violence for voluntary exchange will leave them unharmed know not what they’ll reap. But they’ll deserve every last drop of it.

      • anotherengineer
      • 7 years ago

      retired already, you have a govmint job, or just lucked out financially?

      • TurtlePerson2
      • 7 years ago

      It’s amazing how this statement sparked sub-threads about economics and philosophy. Congratulations.

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        It ended up being The Friday Night Topic

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