iPhone 5 complaints explored

In case you haven’t seen it yet, don’t miss SNL’s take on the pundits’ beefs with the iPhone 5:

 

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    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    Not all that funny… even by normal standards. I really don’t know how this even counts as satire when you buy a $600 phone. Seems like a paid advertisement by Apple honestly. The chinese workers do a couple of things… first the shoot down the problems of the iphone, then they make fun of the issues involving their work place problems that apple is responsible for. Overall they try to make it seem like neither of them matter and attempt to defuse anything involving Apple.

      • tootercomputer
      • 7 years ago

      You’re kidding, right?

    • RhysAndrews
    • 7 years ago

    I lol’d. It wasn’t executed very well but the actual jokes weren’t so bad.

    • albundy
    • 7 years ago

    i laughed WITH SNL 20 years ago when kelly bundy was hot. now i laugh AT them. this is horrible!

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      Don’t you think Kelly Bundy feels the same way about you?

      • Synchromesh
      • 7 years ago

      For an older lady she doesn’t look that bad although it’s probably the makeup.

      Btw, I got the iphone 5 and I find this hilarious. Despite that, I do like the new iphone. It seems to iphone just fine.

    • rhysl
    • 7 years ago

    Was that Christina Applegate hosting that ?.. wow still looking great

    Was ok take off , could have been better

    • tootercomputer
    • 7 years ago

    First, thanks Scott for posting this. As I noted on a prior post, I thought this skit was hilarious.

    Second, after reading some of the comments here, I’m thinking that someone could do a spoof on responses to a comedy show’s satirical take on technology reviewers. I mean, c’mon people, lighten up.

    • Duck
    • 7 years ago

    Give it about a 2/10 for funny. A long way to go to match UK comedy based on mockery and sarcasm.

      • shaq_mobile
      • 7 years ago

      Where’s Mr Neutron when you need him?

      • Game_boy
      • 7 years ago

      It’s like baby steps towards real satire. They’re just stating facts in funny voices and expecting that alone to be funny. (Also British)

        • Waco
        • 7 years ago

        This. SNL stopped being funny a loooooooooooooong time ago.

      • lycium
      • 7 years ago

      I’ll get me coat.

    • Welch
    • 7 years ago

    Was somewhat funny, but they tried to milk it for too long.

    • tootercomputer
    • 7 years ago

    Absolutely one of the funniest things that SNL has done in a long time. I hooted when it came on that night (the entire show that night was quite funny). Fred Armisen had just the right edge.

    • dashbarron
    • 7 years ago

    As the boys in the podcast discussed, I wonder how the change in Apple’s image from the rebel to the big company/the man (despite what they may try to sell) will effect the responses to the product, hype, sales, and criticism they receive. They did receive some gruff under Jobs but he was always great at spinning it, so we’ll have to see how Cook does in the long run.

    It seems that if they keep having product leaks/keep leaking their own products, that the secrecy surrounding an announcement of a product will greatly diminish people’s willingness to throw cash at every product’s release. But even with the details of the iPhone leaked, they’re still selling millions of them.

    • XDravond
    • 7 years ago

    I’m sorry but well funniest was “no you may not” and “aids problem” the rest was just part what’s called “modern humor” or something witch I for some reason never found really funny… Even though it’s a satire I’ll pass…

    Oh well as long as someone find it funny it might be worth the networks money…

    • trackerben
    • 7 years ago

    Countermarketing 101

    To get a marketing campaign to stumble easiest, you teach its audience how to ridicule its product. To get a big man to fall easiest, you teach him to shoot himself in the foot. To get a patient to sicken easiest, you teach him how to infect himself. To get a class to tire easest, you teach them how to mentally stress themselves. And to get a nation to be disappointed easiest, you teach its people how to treat their own Centering stories with contempt.

    You see, it’s not so hard to start a take-down of those you rebel against or refuse to follow.

      • oldog
      • 7 years ago

      Iā€™m not sure I completely follow you, but I take your comments to mean that by discrediting a central tenant of belief in any system/organization you sow the seed of its ultimate demise.

      This is a very interesting premise. Certainly one can point to the Mac v. PC commercials as the start of the fall of at least one giant.

        • trackerben
        • 7 years ago

        You’ve got it right, countermarketing is subversive when induced from within the target culture. There are fascinating cases of this activity at the national level.

        Sometimes it is openly practiced against adversaries, in this instance by wise US statesmen
        [url<]http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/washington/2011-01-23-ronald-reagan-leon-aron_N.htm[/url<] Many times it is engendered internally by disloyal members sympathetic to a countering cause [url<]http://www.humanevents.com/2005/03/22/arthur-millers-other-legacy-stalins-little-helper/[/url<] [url<]http://hnn.us/articles/2731.html[/url<] And in other cases, it is disinformation preparations by enemy agents [url<]http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/206206/seeing-red/ion-mihai-pacepa[/url<] [url<]http://www.pbs.org/redfiles/prop/deep/interv/p_int_vladimir_pozner.htm[/url<]

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    I like how America is learning to outwardly laugh at itself more.
    Some of the best comedy the UK produces mocks the British stereotype.

      • indeego
      • 7 years ago

      SNL is 37+ years old and has always mocked America. This isn’t a particularly new phenomenon either. Tonight show did it decade before.

        • Chrispy_
        • 7 years ago

        Yeah, SNL is a legend, but it’s about the only example I can think of which has America mocking itself directly. We get bucketloads of your dramas and sitcoms, but almost none of your satirical comedy on this side of the pond.

        I’m still catching up on Community and HouseMD: TV is pretty low on my priorities list these days!

      • I.S.T.
      • 7 years ago

      Welcome to Stuff That’s Been Going On Since The 1800s. the US has pretty much always satirized itself, please don’t stereotype us. After all, we have 300 million people. Far too many to put into one mind set.

        • Chrispy_
        • 7 years ago

        You don’t stereotype all Americans. That’s not funny and it’s about as out of place as racism these days. What you stereotype is the corrupt businessman, the racist, the chauvinist, the politician, the control-freak…. These exist everywhere.

        Lest my comment be taken out of context, it used to be rare for non-Americans to see this stuff aired outside of US networks. More and more of these shows are making their way to other countries now, and not just because of the internet – they’re hitting tv channels too. Whether that’s because workforces are more multicultural than ever before, or whether it’s because your sense of satire and dark humour is getting better is anyone’s guess šŸ˜‰

          • I.S.T.
          • 7 years ago

          You should try watching a lot more American comedy. It’s quite common. 30 Rock is RIFE with it, as is South Park, and it happens throughout most other long running comedies for the last 20 someodd years as well(Exceptions given to Friends and anything by CBS because they currently do lowest common denominator humor. Oh how I wish they’d do something as intelligent as All In the Family again…).

          • holophrastic
          • 7 years ago

          I think you might be forgetting what a stereotype is. It’s not unjust to label 300 million based on 100 million. Similarly, a stereotype that fat people over-eat doesn’t attempt to say that every single fat person over-eats. It, and quite correctly I might add, says that if you meet a fat person, you’re better off betting that he over-eats rather than betting that he’s got a thyroid issue. And since the thyroid issue is under 5% (I’m fabricating numbers here) and the over-eat is 10%, then you’re better off betting on the 10%. There can be a hundred different reasons for the fat person, lack of exercise for example, but if over-eating is the highest percentage, even if it’s no where near 50%, it’s still the best bet. That’s a stereotype.

          And stereotypes are good things. They act as cognitive heuristics. The error is to take someone else’s stereotype and continue to bet on it despite your own evidence to the contrary. So if my grandmother, or my neighbour, says that black people steal, it might be right, it might be wrong, it might be statistically valid in their lives. So I’ll take it with a grain of salt and see if it appears statistically valid to my life. If it doesn’t, then I’ll dismiss it from my own judgement. If it does, then I’ll maintain that stereotype as being correct in my life. I won’t force you to follow it, but I will let you know that it’s true in my circumstance. And certainly until I verify it in my life, I won’t hinder someone else’s life as a result. But I will afterwards.

    • BIF
    • 7 years ago

    Love the erhu. Can’t watch the video until I get home tonight, though.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 7 years ago

    It was amusing to start, but in the middle it kind of got drawn out too long.

      • Shambles
      • 7 years ago

      I thought it was clear at the top of the article that it was an SNL skit.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        ha! +1

      • cjava2
      • 7 years ago

      That’s kind of all SNL is. Take something remotely funny, beat it like a dead horse.

    • NeelyCam
    • 7 years ago

    So funny! FIRST world problems…

      • homerdog
      • 7 years ago

      Lice are best!

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