Thursday Shortbread

Eight is Enough

  1. PCWorld: Microsoft launches Windows 8 with great fanfare, few surprises
  2. VR-Zone: Windows 8 is tricky, according to sample of “typical users”
  3. AllThingsD’s exclusive: Intel CEO Paul Otellini on

    Windows 8, the tablet market, and competing with ARM

  4. Electronics Weekly: Intel has no process advantage in mobile, says ARM CEO
  5. Businessweek: AMD faces looming cash crunch amid quest for new markets
  6. VR-Zone reports AMD to enter mobile in a money-

    earning way: Launching a FirePro APU tablet

  7. AnandTech’s Windows 8 RT review
  8. Halo 4 launch gameplay trailer


Thursday

  1. X-bit labs: Leading tech companies form Cyber Security Research Alliance

    and TSMC increases output of 28nm chips by two times in one quarter

  2. NY Daily News: Intel exec claims driverless cars will be available in less than a decade
  3. VR-Zone: Mini Android UG007 PC with Jelly Bean 4.1
  4. Win a Mushkin Chronos Deluxe MX 120 SSD from Big Bruin
  5. Dealzon’s deals: $700 coupon for 15.6″ Lenovo Y480 i7-3610QM /

    GeForce GT 640M, $20 coupon for 15.6″ hp Envy dv6t Quad Edition

    i7-3630QM / Windows 8, $309 off 11.6″ MacBook Air Core 2 Duo,

    and $120 off iPad 3

Mobile

  1. X-bit labs: AMD has 6 to 19 Windows 8 tablet design wins – company
  2. Ars Technica: Samsung loses another big patent case to Apple, this time at ITC
  3. Android to beat Windows in 2016: Gartner
  4. VentureBeat: Amazon is totally freaked out by the iPad mini
  5. AnandTech’s Microsoft Surface review
  6. Engadget’s Asus PadFone 2 review

Software and gaming

  1. PCPer: the Windows you love is gone
  2. Techgage reviews Windows 8
  3. Network World: Windows XP turns 11, still not dead yet
  4. Ocaholic pits Windows 8 vs. 7 – gaming performance Radeon HD 7970
  5. TweakTown’s AMD Catalyst 12.11 Windows 7 driver analysis
  6. Ocaholic pits AMD Catalyst 12.10 WHQL &

    12.11 Beta 4 – HD 7970 gaming performance

  7. Bethesda Blog: More Dishonored content on the way
  8. Rockstar Games: Max Payne 3 title update now available for download
  9. Guru3D: MOH WarFighter graphics VGA performance with 23 graphics cards

Systems and storage

  1. TechReviewSource on Dell XPS and Toshiba Satellite U925t
  2. HT4U reviews Zotac Zbox Nano XS AD11 (in German)
  3. Guru3D reviews AMD FX-8350
  4. Phoronix: Calxeda ECX-1000 benchmarks vs. Intel Atom, TI OMAP4
  5. Hardware Heaven reviews Gigabyte Z77X-UP7
  6. Hardware Secrets on Asus Sabertooth Z77
  7. PureOC reviews Gigabyte GA-F2A85X-UP4
  8. KitGuru reviews Sapphire Pure Platinum A85XT
  9. SPCR reviews Asus F2A85-M Pro
  10. The SSD Review on 480GB PNY XLR8 Pro SSD
  11. TWL reveals the truth about SSD performance numbers
  12. PCPer’s quick look at the data on Apple’s Fusion Drive

Multimedia, power, cases & cooling

  1. Hardware Canucks review 27″ Asus VG278HE 144Hz gaming monitor
  2. Benchmark Reviews on SpeedLink Kudos RS mouse
  3. Legit Reviews on 1000W Antec High Current Pro PSU
  4. OCC’s Aerocool XPredator X1 Evil Black Edition case review
  5. PureOC reviews In Win GRone case
  6. XSReviews on Corsair AF120, SP120 & AP140 fans
  7. HTL reviews Phanteks PH-TC90LS CPU cooler
Comments closed
    • Shouefref
    • 7 years ago

    I’ve seen the demo’s. I’ve read the articles.
    It’s clear: W8 is not something I want.
    There are good ideas in it, but they’ve blown it by forcing things on the desktop user which aren’t suitable for the desktop user.
    I remember when W95 came on the market. I didn’t jump on the bandwagon immediately, but it was clearly an improvement.
    But since XP it’s going downhill.
    The first problem was the limited amount of activations (introduced with the XP series).
    Then came that awfull Vista (difficult to upgrade from XP, lot’s of annoying safety elements)
    W7 was slightly betteer than Vista, but still was not what it should be. That was why I didn’t buy W7.
    I hoped W8 would be the final improvement, but they turned everything upside down.
    I don’t have to use W8 to notice that.
    Maybe W9 will be good. But I even doubt that.

    I see the future like this:
    MS will loose more and more marketshare.
    The only people left, will be those who don’t have any choice but using Windows because of business reasons.
    The prices for those people will go up and up.
    In ten years time, MS products will be expensive.
    Other people will use free products on the internet, like Google Doc and the like.

    And that’s without taking into account the impact of China and India.
    What’s gonna happen when they decide to expend their current hardware factories with software production?

      • Shouefref
      • 7 years ago

      When it comes to hardware, we live in a great era.
      But when it comes to software, it looks as if all the geniuses we had in the 80’s and 90’s are long dead.

      Sidenote: in the 80’s and 90’s there was still lot of competition for software like OS’s and word processors. That’s mostly gone nowadays.
      Could that be the reason MS comes up with something halfbaked like W8?

      • xii
      • 7 years ago

      Content is taking over from software. Hardware and software will just be a locked-down, “big media” controlled jail for content to be consumed on. None of these platforms will have the freedom (and, as a long-time Linux user, note my irony) of old Windows versions running on open hardware.

      Microsoft wants the closed ecosystem that Google/Android/Play, Apple/iTunes and Amazon have. Consumers want to consume, they don’t care about an OS, it is a mere in-between step to get to content. That’s were the money is right now.

      What you see is to some extend the failure of PCs as an open platform, and the future of the walled garden.

      The question is if W9 will still allow you to install non-MS approved software at all.

      In the future, if you want freedom, you will be running Linux. That is, if Linux still runs, because I’m looking around, and I’m not seeing any truly open tablets or phones yet…

      • blargsoup
      • 7 years ago

      Sounds like you are still running XP and don’t realize how much Windows has improved.

      I run Windows 7, and when I have to use an XP machine I feel handcuffed–you should ask a smart friend who runs Windows 7. Maybe you could sit them in front of your XP and see what they think about the boot time, restoring previous versions of files, quickly opening a non-pinned application, setting up file sharing, installing a printer, connecting to wifi, updating Windows, running 64 bit, running off of an SSD or large amounts of cheap RAM, setting up backgrounds and themes, using a TV as a secondary display, security, backups, gaming performance, etc.

      I’m not sold on Windows 8 either, but it’s really still Win7 with some improvements and the RT interface on top. I think it has some dual screen improvements, and it’s a definite consideration if looking for a tablet or touch enabled notebook. It has the potential to make the ipad and company look like toys.

      You wrote that it has been going downhill, but this is not the case, it has been a gradual improvement. This reply is a favor to you to nudge you to give Win7 a go. The annoying security you heard about in Vista is found in all three popular platforms, and it’s part of many security improvements needed when ‘connected’.

    • Larson
    • 7 years ago

    Just “Thursday shortbread”? The 25th of October is St. Crispin’s Day! Should not we few–we happy few–stop to remember?

      • TheMonkeyKing
      • 7 years ago

      Is he the first person to make potato chips?

        • UberGerbil
        • 7 years ago

        And gentlemen in England now-a-bed
        shall think themselves accurs’d they were not here
        to hold their sacks of salty snacks
        while eating crispy chips!

    • xxxSakurachanxxx
    • 7 years ago
    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 7 years ago

    VR-Zone: Windows 8 is tricky, according to sample of “typical users”

    Here’s how you discern a detached from reality windows 8 advertisement from an actual review:
    [quote<]Windows is scheduled for release tomorrow, so you can see for yourself what you think of the operating system. Personally, I find that the "typical windows user" isn't the most computer savvy out there, so this may all be a bit exaggerated.[/quote<] Right, it isn't Microsoft's fault windows 8 is a convoluted mess, it's yours. You're bad for thinking otherwise, and you should feel bad. [quote<] Among the issues they reported back, the users had trouble staring internet explorer, and that they weren't able to discern what text fields were editable when typing emails. In addition, they often felt as if they'd lost access to programs if minimized, as there is no taskbar to organize your open programs. The users did however, admit that the new design was sleek and attractive.[/quote<] /Waves hand It's your fault.... Relearn everything.... You'll learn to love it..... The shill guilt trip brainwashing tripe seems to be about 50/50 with [url=http://techgage.com/article/windows_8_review_-_part_one_the_things_i_hate/<]honest reviews[/url<] pointing out how bad 8 is, not nearly as bad as the 100% it started out as.

      • blargsoup
      • 7 years ago

      You should try doing some tech support for some typical users, you might be surprised how dense they can be.

      The funny thing is that the RT facade of Win8 is stupid simple with touch. Can you think of a simpler OS where you have these huge rectangles on the screen, where grandma can touch email or Facebook and she’s there? Looks to me that the swipe from the sides are the only things to learn, but grandma doesn’t even need to use this.

    • blastdoor
    • 7 years ago

    “Businessweek: AMD faces looming cash crunch amid quest for new markets”

    The bankruptcy of AMD is the best case for ARM on the desktop.

    • blastdoor
    • 7 years ago

    “Android to beat Windows in 2016: Gartner”

    Microsoft has to feel pretty good about this, given how wrong past Gartner predictions have been. Aren’t we all supposed to be using Symbian phones right now or something?

    • nico1982
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]VentureBeat: Amazon is totally freaked out by the iPad mini[/quote<] If Amazon is totally freaked out by the iPad mini because they published a fair list of differences, going by the artful comparison at the keynote, Apple is scared to death by the Nexus 7 😛

      • davidbowser
      • 7 years ago

      I think Apple is/has been concerned about the Nexus 7, in that it helps to build the overall ecosystem for Samsung specifically and Android in general. The fact that it was selling AT ALL was probably the concern for Apple, because that means there was a profitable segment in which they missed, underestimated, were late to market.

      disclosure: I work for VMware, and I need to figure out how to get my signature to work in comments and not just the forums.

      • blastdoor
      • 7 years ago

      Indeed — a stupid article title.

      If anybody should be freaked out about anything, it should be amazon shareholders about the kindle fire, and google shareholders about how the only company to profit from android is Samsung.

        • grantmeaname
        • 7 years ago

        You don’t think Google has profited from Android?

    • ClickClick5
    • 7 years ago

    IX.Guru3D: MOH WarFighter graphics VGA performance with 23 graphics cards

    Bad link.
    Here is the fix:

    [url<]http://www.guru3d.com/articles_pages/medal_of_honor_warfighter_graphics_vga_performance_review,1.html[/url<]

      • Arclight
      • 7 years ago

      Call me crazy but i’m seing a orange/goldy tint on MoH like i noticed a blue tint in BF3. Reminds of CoD, def not gonna buy.

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    From “Businessweek: AMD faces looming cash crunch amid quest for new markets”

    Er, so what now, gerbils? If AMD goes down and their IP gets split between different companies, what will it be like in the x86 industry? Do we pay $500 – $1,000 for our next CPU? And if the GPU IPs go to a company that has no interest in playing in the PC segment, you can bet Nvidia video card prices will rise as well. It’s a lose-lose situation any way you look at it, whether you’re an Intel, AMD or Nvidia fanboi. And so far, there’s been no word on other companies willing to take over their x86 business, and that’s not even discussing whether the x86 license will transfer or not.

    ARM is gaining traction lately but they are relevant only in mobile devices, specifically phones and tablets. Unless you plan to ditch your desktop or laptop I don’t think you have a choice but to keep buying x86 CPUs… from Intel.

    I suppose this is the time when people who mock AMD fanboys can at least shut up. I admit I do like AMD but only because AMD stands for something. AMD stands for lower x86 CPU prices as well as the last man standing in the non-Intel x86 CPU market, and yeah, a credible alternative to Intel (at least their CPUs are good for many things and are actually available, unlike the third brand out there).

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      Cheap CPU pandora’s box has been opened. It won’t be closed even if AMD shuts down. With ARM a real threat the pace of innovation from Intel won’t slow terribly, it will just be even more focused on low power markets than it is now – it’s already shifting that way anyway.

      I’d worry more about the GPU side because there is no substantial threat for NV like there is for Intel, however until the next generation of consoles it doesn’t matter anyway. That side of AMD’s business is the one in which it’s more possible to compete and doesn’t have the x86 license issue so it’s more likely someone will pick it up, if only for HPC application.

      note: “AMD stands for lower x86 CPU prices” – only when they aren’t competitive. They had plenty of expensive CPUs when it was Athlon vs P4.

        • ronch
        • 7 years ago

        As I’ve said, ARM is relevant only in the mobile space. When the time comes to upgrade your x86 CPU you can’t count on ARM’s presence the way you can’t expect lower server processor prices just because there are desktop processors out there. Intel may price their products intended to attack ARM’s markets aggressively but the desktop space is a wholly different matter. They know x86is deeply embedded in the world of computing and they’ll take advantage of that.

        PS – I’m using my ARM-based tablet to post this, and boy is it driving me nutsoy!

          • Arclight
          • 7 years ago

          Yup, short term, before we get an alternative, our wallets will be in for a raping.

          • MadManOriginal
          • 7 years ago

          I’m sorry if you don’t realize that Intel is taking ARM very seriously as a threat. There’s a reason they want to push Haswell to sub-10W and want to use their best process node for Atom in the future when they haven’t for 5 years. It’s not because of AMD that’s for sure, it’s because they see consumers spending on gadgets instead of desktops or laptops and ARM talking up servers. It’s not like a switch will be flipped and x86 will die off instantly, but Intel knows they need to act now in order to prevent it from becoming marginalized over the long run.

          You’re right, the desktop space is wholly different – it’s becoming less important as time passes and is getting to be third wheel beside the couple of sexy mobile and rich server.

            • ronch
            • 7 years ago

            No, I do know that Intel is more cautious with ARM than AMD, but I am talking about x86, something that WILL stay with us for a long time. The fight with ARM is a different matter.

      • Arclight
      • 7 years ago

      Maybe the alpha chips the Chinese been playing with will get some traction. If we have a monopoly in x86 market, people will just stop buying in such high volumes and opportunity for other companies will arise. We already saw Microsoft willing to shift their OS from the traditional x86…..

        • ronch
        • 7 years ago

        MS’s willingness to make an OS for ARM is definitely a good sign and a move towards the right direction. Given a choice, I’d rather have ARM and its partners dominate the computing landscape than Intel having the x86 pie all to itself. It’s somewhat a ‘reset’ of the computing landscape akin to the 70’s when everyone was scrambling to establish themselves. I hope ARM doesn’t become like Intel and try to lock everyone out and keep the arch to itself.

        However, x86 will be difficult to unseat as the dominant computing platform because of the installed base of users and applications already available for it. It may eventually happen of course, but until then it’s gonna be the dark age of computing.

        • Narishma
        • 7 years ago

        Alpha? Did you mean MIPS?

          • ronch
          • 7 years ago

          I’m not sure if I’m referring to the same news here, but I think the Chinese are being courted by Alpha, MIPS and (ARM or PowerPC) for some kind of government-wide project. Take this with a big mound of salt though.

    • Arag0n
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]AnandTech's Microsoft Surface review [/quote<] One of the best reviews, but there was tens of reviews for surface yesterday.

      • Voldenuit
      • 7 years ago

      I liked Ars’ [url=http://arstechnica.com/features/2012/10/windows-8-and-winrt-everything-old-is-new-again/<]in-depth coverage of WinRT[/url<] and [url=http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2012/10/windows-reimagined-a-review-of-windows-8/<]Windows 8[/url<]. The dichotomy and sheer lack of interoperability between WinRT apps and x86/Win32 apps is very disheartening to hear, though.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        The only dichotomy is that devs haven’t run regular Windows apps through the conversion tools yet. That will at least get WinRT desktop apps.

          • Voldenuit
          • 7 years ago

          From the Ars review of Win8:
          [quote<]Where it falls down, hard, is when you try to mix and match. Microsoft has done precious little to bring the Metro environment and the desktop environment together. They're two separate worlds. The charms, in particular, are off-limits to desktop apps. The Search charm won't search the foreground desktop app. Desktop apps can't share or be share targets. Desktop apps don't know about devices, and don't store their settings behind the Settings charm. This makes a mix-and-match approach deeply flawed. I can't even send an e-mail via Outlook from the Metro world. Outlook. Probably one of the most important business applications of all time, and Metro doesn't even know it exists.[/quote<] By design, Metro apps have very limited ability to communicate between themselves, and have no ability to communicate with desktop programs and devices. From the WinRT article: [quote<]The WinRT application model is far more constrained than the Win32 environment of old. WinRT applications will be constrained to sandboxes. They will be isolated both from each other and the operating system: WinRT applications won't in general be allowed to communicate each other, whether for good reasons (such as plug-ins) or bad (such as spyware). They will have only limited access to the file system: by default, they will only be able to open or save files that the user has explicitly picked. Applications generally won't be able to run persistently: the system reserves the right to suspend or kill any application in the background.[/quote<] and [quote<]Chief among them is that WinRT has no mechanisms for interprocess communication (IPC). Normal Windows applications can communicate between one another in all sorts of ways; they can send messages between one another to simulate mouse and keyboard input (and more), they can use the clipboard, they can create local network connections, they can share pieces of memory, they can use certain COM-related technologies; there are lots of options. The problem with all of these systems is that they tend to be quite susceptible to various kinds of attack, and as such, all of them are off-limits to WinRT applications, except for the clipboard, for which there's some support. This is all nice for security and isolation, but applications that can't communicate with one another at all are far from ideal. We want to be able to do things like open a photo in a photo app and then send that to Twitter, or Facebook, or attach it to an e-mail. For these kind of communication tasks WinRT has a number of related, structured communication channels that Microsoft has called contracts and extensions. ... There is, however, a substantial downside to the contracts. As is this case with most of WinRT, contracts aren't usable in desktop applications. This means that, for example, a desktop e-mail client such as Outlook can't be used as a share target. Opening up these contracts to desktop applications would require a bit more plumbing on Microsoft's part, but would greatly enhance the experience of using a mix of WinRT and non-WinRT applications.[/quote<] As it stands, WinRT is highly managed to the point of losing key functionality that developers and users have expected for over a decade. I'm not sure if the hypothetical gains outweigh the negatives.

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      I found this very telling :
      “In Word, it’s relatively easy to pull 30% CPU utilization when typing quickly. Anand saw up to 40% on Surface”

      To me this seem like a very costly and slow ‘netbook’ platform alternative, with the main big advantage is that you can detach the keyboard ?

      Not a bad platform overall, but it seem like a step sideways instead of of a step forward in the ‘netbook’ segment.

        • Arag0n
        • 7 years ago

        But an incredible step forward in the tablet segment. We are judging it as laptop replacement but I think it’s more fair to compare it with an iPad replacement, a device that won’t substitute your desktop (at least not yet) but can keep you on the move without so much problems to work, keep using the web, answer emails, etc without drive you crazy using the on screen keyboard for everything and the consequent real state of usable screen reduced to half.

          • ratte
          • 7 years ago

          Is it really a step forward? I think most tablet buyers will look at the hybrids and think “netbook”.

            • UberGerbil
            • 7 years ago

            I don’t know — I look around coffee shops and I frequently see iPads being used with keyboards. Not as frequently as full laptops, and not as frequently as I see iPads [i<]in other contexts[/i<] being used without a keyboard, but for the people who do work in coffee shops and own a tablet, the "tablet plus keyboard" concept definitely has traction. And presumably if they wanted a netbook they would have one, but that's not what they're using. Maybe they're iDevice die-hards and nothing else would tempt them, but it seems that "tablet plus keyboard" is a definite niche. Whether it's as big as Microsoft clearly hopes it is, is a separate question.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]IV.Electronics Weekly: Intel has no process advantage in mobile, says ARM CEO[/quote<] "Basically, we are lucky Intel isn't using their cutting edge process for mobile, YET, and so I'll only mention process node size as if that tells the whole story about power draw, but we may be f'd when Intel does use their most advanced process for mobile" is what he should have said. disclosure: I own shares of both Intel and ARM. [quote<]II.NY Daily News: Intel exec claims driverless cars will be available in less than a decade[/quote<] I can't wait to live this scene from Total Recall! (the real one) [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74HdbWi28-g[/url<]

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      TIme to sell those ARMH shares – the party’s over

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        Yeah, they’re doing terribly.

        Oh, wait…[url<]http://www.forbes.com/sites/ericsavitz/2012/10/23/arm-holdings-q3-revs-edge-estimates-shares-on-the-rise/[/url<]

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          The past quarter is already baked in into the price, as are the next few ones based on that ARM folks expect continuous growth.

          The real kicker is how Intel is disrupting the marketplace – already the 32nm chips are at beating ARM 28nm chips in power efficiency and performance (RAZR i vs. RAZR M). And with these statements from Warren East, I’m wondering if this is just pure marketing BS or if he actually thinks Intel doesn’t have a process lead.. if it’s the latter, all the predictions he’s making about a sustainable growth are questionable.

          I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: Intel will take the lead in cell phone chips. 22nm will beat the ARM chips cleanly in power efficiency when they come out, and 14nm (15nm?) chips are the nails in the coffin. ARMH is a bubble that [i<]will[/i<] burst sometime soon. The question is, do you want to sell high, or be the one left holding the shares when it's all said and done.. Remember what happened to AMD.. ("AMD can't possibly go below $10". "I meant $5.." "What I really said was $3..")

          • sschaem
          • 7 years ago

          Revenue of $227.9? Thats really abysmal, specially considering that they have margins like AMD in the 45%. (edit: relative to their 15 billion market cap)

          The risk with ARM is that they have everything to loose. When you own 98% of the market
          and a competitor like Intel paint a target on your back…
          Intel is building a new GPU architecture, new mobile CPU architecture, 14nm manufacturing .

          When already a singe core legacy Atom on 32nm crush the latest and best of the best ARM SoC,
          the situation for ARM is dire.

          I cant predict when, but this stock will do a netflix. And PE will drop to market average. (~11)
          That mean ARM stock will settle to ~$5 by late 2013 early 2014.

          PS: A big reason for the extravagant PE for a company that makes so little money is from the hope of an acquisition… but ARM cant be sold anymore.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            First off, I’m not sure why you two didn’t get that I’m saying Intel is looking good long-term and that I was mocking ARM’s CEO.

            To illustrate the business side of things *until* Intel is truly competitive, I give you this: [url<]http://finance.yahoo.com/echarts?s=ARMH+Interactive#symbol=armh;range=6m;compare=intc;indicator=volume;charttype=area;crosshair=on;ohlcvalues=0;logscale=off;source=undefined;[/url<] I used 6 months because June was the last retrenchment to a bottom, but the important part is the direction of the two stocks. ARM making 10 year (post dot-com) highs, Intel 52-week lows. ARM is probably a bit high for now and Intel low, but that's the direction they've gone. As Neely says, the stock market looks forward, and for now it sees a rocky 6-12 months for Intel. (Since you mention P/E...ARM is one of those stocks that just seems to be able to maintain a high P/E despite broader market conditions. Doesn't mean that will last forever but nothing does. *edit: ex - Amazon has had a pretty outrageous P/E for quite some time now.) Things may look very different once Intel releases 14nm Atoms and they have time to permeate to OEM designs. That time is not now however, and when it does come there's this neat thing called 'selling a stock.' Finally, I would say that there's no requirement that they can't both grow and prosper as this market gets bigger. At the rate mobile and low power applications are growing, they could both do very well going forward. A company doesn't need to be a monopoly to make money, if said market grows 2x and share goes from 100-0 to 50-50, the former 100 still has the same absolute market size.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            cause it’s sschaem? his posts never make sense.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]First off, I'm not sure why you two didn't get that I'm saying Intel is looking good long-term and that I was mocking ARM's CEO.[/quote<] I got it, and I was mocking ARM CEO, too - my point is that ARM is overpriced compared to its future prospects.

            • Hattig
            • 7 years ago

            “When already a singe core legacy Atom on 32nm crush the latest and best of the best ARM SoC,
            the situation for ARM is dire.”

            “Crushes” meaning that in a very x86 optimised test – Javascript performance, that also happens to be very single-threaded, a single core Atom ekes out ahead of a single/dual/quad core ARM.

            Exynos 5 is already posting better Javascript benchmarks than the phone Atoms btw.

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]Exynos 5 is already posting better Javascript benchmarks than the phone Atoms btw.[/quote<] You mean a quad-core vs. single-core? x86 can come with multiple cores too, you know Note that, for phone processors, performance/watt is king, and - surprise surprise! - in power efficiency Atom is better at 32nm. I wouldn't call it "crushing" yet - that comes at 22nm. EDIT: the Exynos 5 Sunspider benchmark was for a dualcore: [url<]http://www.androidauthority.com/exynos-5-dual-benchmarks-125134/[/url<] Chromebook (dual-core A15): 668.5ms RAZR i (single-core Atom): 1086.6

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        Man, you gave me deja vu, you’ve been saying that for what seems like years now!

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          Yeah – I fully expected to be called on it when ARM surprised with the latest results and the stock price jumped up by 10%..

      • blastdoor
      • 7 years ago

      Did you read the EW article on Intel/ARM?

      It talks about the fact that Intel will eventually move mobile to the front of the line for the latest process, but that by the time that happens, the foundry guys may be nearly caught up.

      Intel may find itself yearning for the good old days when all they had to worry about was AMD with its pesky 64 bit, dual core processors.

      AMD is dead, long live ARM.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        Yes, I did read it. The article has a lot of misleading half-truths. It mixes 14nm production and 14nm ‘mobile’ production without being clear. Also, this line is what I was referring to about process node size “we’re sceptical about this because, while the ARM ecosystem was shipping on 28nm, Intel was shipping on 32nm. So I don’t see where they’re ahead.” Well, they’re ahead because Intel’s 32nm process is better than GF’s and TSMC’s 28nm. Process node size is a gross oversimplification of power draw and even die size. Then there is stuff like this “Jean-Marc Chery, CTO of STMicroelectronics points out that the drawn gate length on Intel’s ˜22nm” process is actually 26nm.” The same could be said for GF’s “14nm-XM” which is a mix of 14nm and 20nm. Intel will also be the first to use 450mm wafers which helps margins.

        Then there’s execution, where Intel typically outperforms in both timeframe and yield, and others do worse.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      YOU OWN SHARES?!?!?! ARE YOU A MILLIONAIRE?!

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        No, I’m just not a fool who spends as much or more than I make. I haven’t had the [s<]luck[/s<] foresight to have a stock that is up 60x yet either.

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<]I haven't had the luck foresight to have a stock that is up 60x yet either.[/quote<] Oooh... that was rough. I didn't take you to be one of those meanies who bully retirees. I just bought INTC, right after the earnings announcement when the stock took a dip. Because Intel can't possibly go below $20

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            I am no age-ist, I bully everyone equally!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This