Google unveils new Nexus devices

Although Hurricane Sandy caused Google to cancel the media event it had planned for today, the company has updated its blog with official details on the latest additions to the Nexus family. Let’s start with the Nexus 10 tablet, whose 10″ screen offers a 2560×1600 display resolution—the same resolution as 30″ desktop monitors, and about 32% more pixels than a Retina-equipped iPad. The Nexus 10 has a pixel density of 300 PPI, which is notably higher than the 264 PPI of the iPad and roughly double that of Windows tablets like the Microsoft Surface RT and the Asus VivoTab RT.

Unfortunately, the official blog post announcing the Nexus 10 is a little short on technical specifications. There’s no confirmation of rumors that the display uses AMOLED rather than IPS technology, and Google doesn’t say what SoC is under the hood. Samsung partnered with Google on the device, so the ARM Cortex-A15 processor mentioned on the Nexus 10 product page probably bears the Exynos name. Samsung’s involvement also lends credence to the AMOLED rumors.

We do know that the Nexus 10 measures 8.9 mm (0.35″) thick and weighs 603 grams (1.3 lbs). The battery is supposed to be capable of fueling nine hours of video playback and 500 hours of standby time. Interesting, the tablet’s stereo speakers face the user instead of being buried on the back panel. Support for MIMO Wi-Fi has been integrated, as well.

The Nexus 10 will start selling on November 13. Two versions will be offered: a 16GB model for $399 and a 32GB one for $499. Those prices put the Nexus 10 between the iPad and the 8.9″ Kindle Fire HD.

To do battle with smaller tablets like the iPad Mini and the 7″ Kindle Fire, Google has added a 32GB model to its Nexus 7 line. The new device will sell for $249, bumping the 16GB model down to $199. There’s also a $299 version of the 32GB variant with HSPA+ broadband built in. The 8GB Nexus 7 appears to have been discontinued.

On the smartphone front, the new Nexus 4 combines a quad-core Snapdragon S4 processor with a 4.7″ 1280×768 display that boasts a pixel density of 320 PPI. Inductive charging is supported, but it’s unclear whether a charging mat is included. LG was Google’s hardware partner for this puppy, which will cost $299 for the 8GB version and $349 for 16GB. Like current Nexus phones, both models are unlocked.

All of the new Nexus devices will run Android 4.2, an updated version of Jelly Bean with support for multiple users. Apparently, you’ll be able to switch users instantly from the lock screen. Android 4.2 also features a Swype-style gesture keyboard and an updated camera with a panorama mode. Google Now has been updated, too, with new cards that track flight information, restaurant reservations, and shipping details.

The Nexus 10 is the most intriguing device of the lot, and I’m really curious to see how the screen stacks up against the iPad’s Retina panel, which has become the benchmark for tablet displays. I can’t help but feel a little jilted by the pricing, though. On the Nexus 10, jumping from 16GB to 32GB costs an extra $100. The same increase in capacity costs only $50 on the Nexus 7.

Comments closed
    • Freon
    • 7 years ago

    I can’t believe they left out an SD slot. It’s really inexcusable. I was shopping for an Android tablet a few days ago and was about to pull the trigger on a Nexus 10 until I saw the lack of SD. I want a nice fast full Google Play Android (i.e. no thanks Fire 8.9 HD) device with a high res display.

    The whole reason I want a true Android tab is that Google has historically tended away from doing silly things like this as opposed to Apple. There’s just no reason to leave out an SD slot.

    Cost? Bull****. They’re probably just pushing cloud services or something. I just don’t get it. Not that I’m opposed to cloud necessarily, but I want portability and the ability to yank a card and choose how to use my data.

    Now looking at the Asus TF700 instead…

    • deruberhanyok
    • 7 years ago

    This is great and all, but, Google, would you consider a nexus phone with a smaller screen? When I saw “Nexus 4” I expected a “4 inch screen” not “almost 5 inches”.

    Give us something smaller and it will help with battery life – you can use that as a selling point! Sell it for $199/$249 and see how that affects prices on the market.

    Also, a microSD slot would be nice. Or at least 16GB of storage standard – we can’t all live in the cloud.

    I think the lack of LTE is really not that big of a loss – HSPA+ can be plenty fast. Being an older technology it may end up not draining batteries as much as LTE would.

    It bothers me that the only place to get an unlocked phone that isn’t subject to carrier-restricted updates only sells one model at a time.

    • mcnasty72@gmail.com
    • 7 years ago

    My question is why would anyone purchase an android based phone not created by Google’s smartphone department Motorola? At this point they Google has COMPLETE control of the hardware & software, same as Apple.

      • Ethyriel
      • 7 years ago

      Because we haven’t seen anything decent out of them yet. Google seems to be, rightfully, more interested in their patents and maintaining relationships with other manufacturers. I’m hoping they open up the Nexus branding some more, and start pushing out some killer Motorola phones. SO far, I’m not impressed.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        probably because they know they’ll get the patent hammer right on google. I think they’ll take their time making sure MS can’t attack them any more than possible.

    • Sam125
    • 7 years ago

    The specs on the Nexus 10 looks pretty good. 32gb for $500 sounds really attractive to me.

    • link626
    • 7 years ago

    too much bezel !!!!

    • no51
    • 7 years ago

    Google will be making a big mistake with both this and the Nexus tablet if they are only doing this in order to slap their brand on a device that is made by somebody else. It’s not just that their brand isn’t worth much — it’s that they would be missing the advantages of vertical integration while creating consumer confusion and alienating their OEM partners. So it would be all cost and no benefit.

    The only way it makes sense for GOOG to make its own devices is if GOOG decided to fully embrace a vertically integrated business model. Otherwise it’s an empty, useless gesture.

    • xxxSakurachanxxx
    • 7 years ago
    • BoBzeBuilder
    • 7 years ago

    Behold. My future phone and tablet. Very near future.

      • squeeb
      • 7 years ago

      +1

    • Anarchist
    • 7 years ago

    … dang, … google needs to hire industrial designer quick …

    • derFunkenstein
    • 7 years ago

    The lack of LTE isn’t a huge deal considering the (domestic, at least) carrier they’re working with. T-Mobile’s 4G is 42mbit HSDPA+, rather than LTE. So if you live in a T-Mobile 4G area, you should still get really good up/down speeds. Depending on where I am in town, I get between 800kbit (at home, inside) and 3mbit (at K-Mart, near a tower). If I go across the river into Peoria I’ve seen 7-8mbit. For what I want out of a phone, even the 800kbit is doable and 3mbit is plenty. In real urban areas it should be much higher. I’m on wifi wherever I go frequently.

    If there’s a CDMA version of the phone coming, it’ll have LTE, I’m sure. Verizon will require that. And it’ll be more expensive, most likely.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      Would have been nice if they’d gone with DC-HSDPA at least. Even if only for specs showing 42Mbps, and it would have helped in the real world too.

        • DancinJack
        • 7 years ago

        Does MDM9x15 include DC? If so, it’s got it.

          • MadManOriginal
          • 7 years ago

          Specs page says HSDPA 21Mbps.

            • DancinJack
            • 7 years ago

            Link please. I’ve seen contrasting reports.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            I decided to be nice and not LMGTFY 🙂 although that would have been some good irony

            [url<]https://play.google.com/store/devices/details?id=nexus_4_8gb&feature=microsite[/url<] *It says HSPA+, I was writing HSDPA, not really sure if there's a difference but the 21Mbps is the important info.

            • DancinJack
            • 7 years ago

            HDSPA and HSUPA are classes under HSPA and HSPA+. D for downlink and U for uplink.

            Thanks. I was looking at the actual Nexus page and not the Play Store page. Other places had reported 42 though.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            Thanks. The mobile tech acronyms and meanings confuse me more than computer stuff. I didn’t keep up with it as it was evolving, and there’s just so much more variation.

      • DancinJack
      • 7 years ago

      Don’t get your hopes up. Google talked about why they didn’t make LTE an inclusion.

      Linky: [url<]http://www.theverge.com/2012/10/29/3569688/why-nexus-4-does-not-have-4g-lte[/url<]

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        Like I said, the announcement today is more than enough for me – I don’t intend to get an LTE device until it’s on T-Mobile

          • MadManOriginal
          • 7 years ago

          Is your current phone HSPA 21mpbs or 42mbps? If the latter, would 21mbps be slower, even if it’s sufficient?

            • DancinJack
            • 7 years ago

            He just got a One S. I imagine he’s pretty well set on the phone thing for a while.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            I hope you mean a Galaxy Nexus :p I thought that thread was ludi, not derFunk.

    • gmskking
    • 7 years ago

    I will keep my 32GB LTE Nexus from Verizon for a while longer.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      Considering they released a GSM-only phone and Verizon is CDMA, that’s probably wise. Dip shit.

        • willmore
        • 7 years ago

        You’d think with a name like gsmking that he’d understand that. *facepalm*

          • cynan
          • 7 years ago

          You guys need to chillax. He could have just as easily meant that, given the lack of LTE (and possibly other features) on the new Nexus, that it wasn’t worth switching handsets OR carriers for…

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        wow…. what’s with the insult??!?!! that’s not like you

    • titan
    • 7 years ago

    Just as I’m about to get a Nexus from Verizon they tell me this!

    It’s okay, I’m not to keen on LG anyway. I’ll stick with the Samsung.

    • sschaem
    • 7 years ago

    16:10 2560×1600 tablets… while the PC industry focus on 1920×1080 16:9 work monitors?

    Their is no hope for the Pc industry.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]Their is no hope for the Pc industry.[/quote<] Their is no hope for the human race, either. Sigh.

        • UberGerbil
        • 7 years ago

        [url<]http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lwxayke4Lj1qc41tpo1_500.jpg[/url<]

    • StuG
    • 7 years ago

    Why has high PPI not moved to Desktops?

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      Yep, I’m still waiting since 2004 for 30″ monitor price to drop, or even get 1 extra pixel in resolution.

      Going into 2013, 9 year, and the PC didn’t improve res by 1 pixel and prices are the same.

      The Pc industry is just sitting around twiddling their thumbs, lamenting that there is no growth,
      but frankly they are to blame.

        • UberGerbil
        • 7 years ago

        The materials and fabrication (and defect rate) involved in a 4″ screen are a little different than they are in 30″. Not to mention the economies of scale involved with producing something that millions of people can put in their pocket vs something a relatively few enthusiasts and professionals want on their desks. All the economies on large panels are soaked up by 1080p screens. Until there is high consumer demand for higher PPI on larger screens (quad HD or whatever), the manufacturers know they’re producing for a niche audience that is willing to pay higher prices to have its itch scratched.

        At least the tide of awful-TN panels has mostly turned (especially, thanks to every-possible-orientation tablets, at sizes suitable for laptops).

      • kroker
      • 7 years ago

      The reason people want Windows in the first place, is the wealth of compatible applications, many of which were not built for high PPI:

      [quote<] Sadly, there's one little flaw that prevents us from giving this ultrabook a full-fledged TR Editor's Choice award. The problem isn't Asus' fault by any means—indeed, we need more notebook makers to take the plunge and offer high-PPI laptops, lest the status quo remain unchanged. But the issue is bound to annoy prospective users just the same. That problem, as you've probably guessed, is spotty software support for the high-PPI display. Folks shouldn't have to compromise between ugly graphics scaling and Lilliputian fonts when browsing the web, but it's a sad reality that must be confronted with the Zenbook Prime. Other Windows apps also exhibit an occasional reticence to bend themselves to the system's DPI setting. Windows 8 may improve or even resolve the situation entirely, but this ultrabook ships with Windows 7 right now, and wishful thinking about future fixes isn't enough to warrant a more solid endorsement. [/quote<] [url<]https://techreport.com/review/23584/asus-zenbook-prime-ux31a/11[/url<] With a much tighter control on the systems it sells, Apple can move around this a lot more easily. Windows' strength is also its weakness it seems.

      • Flatland_Spider
      • 7 years ago

      Operating systems aren’t resolution independent (specifically Windows since it actually has marketshare), LCD manufacturers are focused on building TVs, OEMs are misers who only want the cheapest parts that sell in the highest quantities and don’t care what is actually better for getting work done, and people don’t want to pay for them because they are cheap and can’t read text at high resolutions because operating systems are not resolution independent.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 7 years ago

    I am very, very pleased to see Google launching the Nexus 4 ar $300/350! I was expecting the initial price to be high like the Galaxy Nexus was. Although it would have been ideal if there was an SD slot, or at least higher memory options…like AbRASiON says, some people could use more storage it won’t be hard to workaround with USB OTG. The cloud doesn’t cut it in the USA with data plan caps. No LTE these days is a pretty big letdown though, must have been a cost measure but I hope it wasn’t a tradeoff for the imo less useful quad core, DC-HSPA would have at least been some kind of compromise but it’s ‘only’ HSPA+ 21Mbps. Maybe there will be an update or another version.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      yeah, this is crazy. makes the 600$ for a nokia 920 look a little nuts. Yes it’s a better phone, with better hardware, and an arguably better OS, but it’s also double the price. hmmmmmm

        • DancinJack
        • 7 years ago

        Oh SSK. You rarely disappoint.

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          disappoint how? i was saying the 920 is twice the price unlocked, if that was the confusing part…
          basically, it’s got a significant price increase for the OS. yeah, the better camera, lte, better screen, and more storage might cost more, but 300$ more? this is cheap enough I might buy it..

          i do love you too

            • DancinJack
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]Yes it's a better phone, with better hardware, and an arguably better OS[/quote<] Some hardware obviously is objective, but the rest of what you said is totally based on opinion.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            i’m not sure what that means. it DOES have better hardware. best camera in the industry, best screen, LTE and both have an S4.

            as for the OS, it gets great reviews, similar to android, but gets complaints in the app department. the OS isn’t the problem, it’s the dev support. i don’t think it was a bad or unreasonable statement.

            • DancinJack
            • 7 years ago

            I don’t know about the camera so I’ll leave it out.

            How can you say it has the best screen? Tech spec wise? Reviewer wise? People like different screens. It may be the one you like the most, but that does’t mean it’s the de facto best.

            LTE doesn’t mean better. People with HSPA+ 42 aren’t complaining about LTE.

            The S4 Pro in this Nexus is a quad-core while the S4 in the Lumia is the dual core variant. You’re saying the Lumia is “better” still?

            I’m just saying that most of this stuff is pretty subjective. People like different things. You’re just trying to justify a higher price tag because you like the product. If you like it, buy it man.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            it has the best low light photo’s as reported by every independent preview every. Also only mobile camera in the world with optical image stabilization. Excellent reviews, bing should help you with that.
            it has the best screen for a variety of reasons. fastest refresh rate in the industry, excellent ppi at 330 (1766×768), support super sensitive touch, will work with keys, banana’s, gloves, etc. independent reviews have shown best sunlight viewing, lowest reflections as well. it just IS the best screen. you can bing it if you want more details.
            you’re right that lte doesn’t automatically mean better, it’s not anywhere near me. That being said, i think most people would prefer it was there vs not. those that are able to take advantage of it will like it. that’s like anything though. PPI means nothing to people with poor eyesight. who cares about audio quality when they’re deaf?

            didn’t see that it was quad core, that would make it faster.

            the stuff i mentioned WASN’T subjective. you’re also missing the point, i’m saying the higher price tag ISN’T justified.

            • DancinJack
            • 7 years ago

            Hold on there little buddy. You’re now saying that having better hardware (I’m not saying the Lumia does) doesn’t justify a higher price?

            Like I said I don’t know much about camera stuff. You are wrong about at least one thing though. It’s not the first phone/mobile camera with OIS. See [url=http://www.engadget.com/2011/12/07/sharp-aquos-sh-01ds-optical-image-stabilizer-hands-on-video/<]here[/url<]. Yes that phone isn't in the US or Canada, but you said first. It's not. I do think it uses the same technology though. The screen I'm sure is nice. The resolution is actually 1280x768. No big deal though. Anything ~300ppi is more than enough to display good images and crisp text on a 4.5" screen. The last thing I'd like to say is this. I think you are missing my whole point. Just because it's a quad core doesn't mean it is better. We're dealing with two different operating systems and many different other things. Just like the screen and LTE, just because it has those specs doesn't automatically make it better.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            i’m saying i don’t see the additional hardware justifying double the price. if the price has come down THAT much, then why is this phone still 600-800?

            the quad core point is fair, and yeah, wasn’t thinking, it is 1280. i would still say that the hardware is better on the 920. all subjectiveness aside. i know the advantages better software can bring to performance, heck, i’m a wp7 single core user! but i still think the nokia has better hardware.

            as for that sharp, damn, liars have been advertising as the first (maybe only???) with OIS. something like that

            • Arag0n
            • 7 years ago

            The point is that google does not try to make money from the nexus devices… they use the nexus devices to increase the ecosystem and work as a reference model. Also, some people prefer the vanila nexus device than manufacturers skinned android. Google is playing dirty here since they are able to sell at loss because they are not a manufacturer, so they don’t need to make money to have profits. Google is playing the Chinese trick here, sell at loss or no benefit to capture marketshare. They don’t care at all since their revenue comes from google services and ads.

            Just to give you an example, think about a Internet company that sells voice calls to mobile and landlines for free. They do it for free because they want that service as advertisement of their other products. However, there is companies selling those kind of services for a fee to cover costs. How are those companies going to be competitive any time soon? It’s not fair to compare Nexus prices to other manufacturers prices…. just as Amazon is trying to use price to move everyone to amazon tablets.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            I know how it works, but the strategy is compelling. it makes even the most interested wp users want to save 300$

            • Arag0n
            • 7 years ago

            Well, you are wrong however… Lumnia 920 off contract will be 550$ in Canada and 32Gb… so the difference is between 350$ and 550$, it’s only 200$. Don’t bite in google’s bait… cheap just means cheap, they are willing to destroy the market to get the share. The iPhone is ridiculously overpriced butt he 500 to 600$ for top-tier and 300 to 500 mid range is a healthy range of prices that can keep all the industry alive.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            $200 is a considerable chunk of change. We’re talking more than 50% more expensive here.

            • Arag0n
            • 7 years ago

            Sure, but as I said, Google can sell the Nexus 4 at loss…. they still can make money back via Market and other google services. Now, how can any other manufacturer (besides Apple) do that? They must compete with hardware and get money from the sales. Most of manufacturers still lose money so in no way those handsets are overpriced.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            extremetech has an article on this. they’re happy to sell as a loss to make up on advertising. they think it’s awesome, i’m not so sure. i like my privacy.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            Ads on WP8 homescreen a la XBox 360 coming in 3…2…

            • Arag0n
            • 7 years ago

            Xbox 360 is a product that was created with the Nexus line business model in mind… sell software at loss or with very narrow margin and get money from users usage, software revenues and accessories…. I’m sure the world will move to that because people just see cheaper prices, but we will end with phones that use ads to reduce the final price 5$… hey! 2 years of 3h per day usage, 180 ads per day, that’s 140.000 ad impressions…

            As I said, Google is using the Chinese market tactics… and we all know how well those tactics worked for most of companies in western world… it remembers me to an article about Asian sex workers trying to be cheaper than each other to get most customers but at the end the only thing that happened is that everyone was selling their body for almost no-money, while in western world most of bitches were setting as high prices as possible and the consequence is that they were getting paid much more for the same services. It also applied to Internet sex cams. If you have some people in a market willing to go to loss or as deep as possible in price even if it means make no money, the market will be destroyed. Just look at google manufacturers, only Samsung is able to keep profitable and increase revenue QoQ.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            yeah, i see that this morning. actually a fair price. that’s easier to swallow than the 6-800 i was seeing rumored…. i wasn’t actually going to buy this, i do love my wp

      • cynan
      • 7 years ago

      When the Galaxy Nexus came out, it wasn’t available directly from Google; only from carriers (who are known for selling hardware at inflated prices) and the more dubious hardware retailers. But yeah, I still expected it to go for more than the $349 the Galaxy Nexus has been going for recently on Google.

    • kvndoom
    • 7 years ago

    “On the Nexus 10, jumping from 16GB to 32GB costs an extra $100. The same increase in capacity costs only $50 on the Nexus 7.”

    Aww come on, you know that 10″ flash costs more to produce than 7″ flash!

    • sweatshopking
    • 7 years ago

    I WON’T SAY A WORD ABOUT THE WINDOWS PHONE 8 LAUNCH.

      • Farting Bob
      • 7 years ago

      Ok.

        • DancinJack
        • 7 years ago

        No one else is either, don’t worry. I haven’t seen nearly anything about it on the Interwebs except for people saying, “oh yeah WP8 today too.”

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          and the reviews?
          there have been a lot. the verge has one up, and THEY DECIDED IT SUCKED.

            • DancinJack
            • 7 years ago

            I haven’t read any yet. How is the new maps?

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            mixed reviews. the verge (as always) hates them, engadget likes them. it’s mixed.
            basically, if you like windows phone 7, or like windows 8, you’ll like windows phone 8. has a bunch of features nobody else has (like live lockscreens that update with sports scores, etc.) but it’s not likely to attract somebody who already hates wp7. lots more integration with xbox and win 8 though. i’d like a 920, but with it just being on rogers, i don’t think i can go for it. i don’t want to go back to long distance existing, and it’s a LOT more like 30$ more a month for half the data, less minutes (i’m currently unlimited) and no long distance with rogers.

            • solo_clipper
            • 7 years ago

            Yep, it’s those three dudes that got run out of Engadget. Nilly,,,, and I can’t remember the other two’s names, the one that can’t get his ideas out of his mouth and the guy with the big nose. Total fan boys or on the payroll.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            If the Verge says it, then it must be true.

            Man, I crack myself up sometimes.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            actually, those guys are annoying. i was just listening to their podcast, and they were going on and on about how stupid the kids corner is, because they’re marketing to moms, and that’s stupid. who the hell wants a phone with different profiles anyway!?!?! segway to the nexus AND OMG IT HAS MULTIPLE USER SUPPORT!!! AMAZING!!!!!!!!! BEST IDEA EVER AND SUPER SMART!!! those guys are so fanboyish they make adi AND me feel unbiased.

            • Arag0n
            • 7 years ago

            The poin tis, no one in the verge has kids so no one understands how annoying can be to have a kid that keeps toying your smartphone, uninstalling your games, applications and all… setup the kids corner to let your kid play with the games he wants and you don’t worry anymore.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 7 years ago

          edit: wait, nevermind. They have a bunch on Windows 8. Not the phone OS.

    • Helmore
    • 7 years ago

    The Nexus 10 uses a PLS display, which is Samsung’s alternative to IPS and should be a little better than a competing IPS based display. It should be a proper RGB pixels based panel.

      • Chrispy_
      • 7 years ago

      I’m not so sure why people are obsessed with RGB panels. I thought the pentile was an admirable way of getting sharper, higher-res screens without driving up costs or power requirements much.

      Yes, under a microscope or super-zoom lens, you can see the difference, but at the PPI’s we’re talking about these days, it’s really not a problem and it hasn’t been a problem since the low-PPI 800×480 screens of yesteryear. Anything “HD” or higher in a handheld device is going to be pin-sharp at sensible (ie, more than four-inch) distances.

        • ludi
        • 7 years ago

        Although the Pentile arrangement does allow for some “cheating” on display resolution, I thought it was mainly designed to compensate for the dissimilar brightness and aging characteristics of the three primary OLED colors: green is brightest and longest-lasting, blue is the dimmest and has the worst lifespan.

          • Laykun
          • 7 years ago

          Ludi has it right. If you’ve ever seen an HTC Desire in this day most of them have the worst burn in you’ve ever seen.

          To my eyes pentile is just not quite right, where as RGB arrangement looks perfect and solid.

    • 00-Evan
    • 7 years ago

    Yeah yeah but what’s the DAC? $300 for a top of the line smartphone is awesome, but if it’s a downgrade for music compared to my Nexus S there’s not really much point to upgrading. $300 implies some heavy corner cutting, so i’m not optimistic. Quite annoying that to get DAC info you basically have to wait for someone to tear the thing apart and take pictures of the bits. Anyone know anything about this?

    EDIT: speculation points toward the DAC being good, as Qualcomm has a DAC they include on their SoC, obviously nothing certain yet, waiting for some reviews though.

      • DancinJack
      • 7 years ago

      [url<]http://www.headphone.com/headphone-amps/headroom-total-bithead.php[/url<]

        • 00-Evan
        • 7 years ago

        But then it costs $450 to upgrade and gives me another thing to carry around, so i’m no longer interested. I’m picky but i’m no audiophile so the DAC in my Nexus S is perfect for me, the poor thing is just starting to chug along thanks to 2 years of software updates =S. Ah well, once CM10 finally comes out of nightlies i’ll start looking for pared down kernels and can probably get some speed back that way.

          • brucethemoose
          • 7 years ago

          Ya, external DACs are usually too much of a hassle.

            • DancinJack
            • 7 years ago

            I disagree, but obviously our situations are probably different.

          • DancinJack
          • 7 years ago

          Well, pick one. Updated phone or “poor” sound quality.

            • 00-Evan
            • 7 years ago

            and that’s what frustrates me, new expensive phones are, infact, a downgrade in a major way.

            a great phone DAC costs no more than $5 to the manufacturer, I would easily pay an extra $30 for one.

            Obviously it’s not included because the vast majority of users don’t care, but those same people only started caring about resolution when apple starting pushing the retina display, perhaps we need something similar for DACs.

            • DancinJack
            • 7 years ago

            I think your logic is flawed here. SOME people surely didn’t care about higher resolutions until Apple started including them, but I can for sure tell you that’s not the whole story. I wouldn’t mind a higher quality audio experience on my phone, but that’s not something at the top of my list.

            I don’t know what to tell ya, man. Just something you may have to live with.

            • 00-Evan
            • 7 years ago

            Yep =S, which is why I might be sticking to my Nexus S until it croaks, or I get a deal from my providor to take a huge chunk out of an expensive, good sounding phone.

            • DancinJack
            • 7 years ago

            I know a good place to get some info. Brian Klug at Anandtech knows his crap about this stuff. I’ll give him a shout and see what he knows about current smartphones.

      • brucethemoose
      • 7 years ago

      +1, I would give more thumbs if I could.

      Knowing LG, and having owned an LG phone before, I wouldn’t get my hopes up.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      DAC chip matters but it’s only part of the equation. Implementation is what *really* matters, it’s just easy for people to spot the DAC chip rather than figure out the implementation. Modern DAC chip all spec really well and should be equally transparent. Analog output quality, PCB layout, power supply, all play as much of a role as the DAC chip.

        • 00-Evan
        • 7 years ago

        I agree, but a good DAC generally implies decent implementation, why should a manufacturer spend on a good DAC with a poor implementation, which will make enthusiasts will turn up their noses, when they won’t advertise the DAC to the general populous anyway? From what I’ve seen those who pull the phone apart for the DAC will usually comment on the implementation too.

          • MadManOriginal
          • 7 years ago

          I don’t agree that a good DAC means a good implementation, or at leat not *better* sound quality…like I said, any modern DAC has the potential to be transparent. Reviews are almost always subjective though, or at best a list of the surrounding chips and SMD components. Again, neither of those fully determines the resultant sound quality, especially not with a variety of headphones. Objective measurements are very few and far between, and ‘x DAC = good, Y DAC = bad’ is a gross oversimplification.

            • 00-Evan
            • 7 years ago

            Right, and again, I agree, let me restate myself.

            A good DAC is a good starting point, obviously there’s more to it, some of which I understand some of which I don’t, but a cheaper DAC implies the manufacturer did not consider audio quality as important for the device, i.e. it will probably have poor sound quality.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      Well, it IS LG we’re talking about here. Corners will be cut.

      • kc77
      • 7 years ago

      The International SG3 specifically might be your only choice. From what I’ve read that specific model has pretty good audio.

        • 00-Evan
        • 7 years ago

        And it’s also $600, therein lies my problem. Perhaps i’m just expecting too much for too little, but I don’t want to spend $600 on a top of the line smartphone when a last years hot stuff for $300 is plenty for me.. as long as the audio is good, which it usually isn’t.

        That’s why i’m so skeptical about the Nexus 4, a $300 dollar top of the line modern smartphone with great audio would be just too good to be true.

          • kc77
          • 7 years ago

          Unfortunately little in life is free. If you want top notch audio in a phone they are going to make you pay for it.

          That’s probably why Samsung removed it from the US version. Few people have experienced good audio to know what it sounds like on a phone.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            By accounts on head-fi, the Galaxy Nexus had good SQ. Phone makers target mass market, not audiophiles, so their idea of ‘good sound’ is crap like Beats branding by HTC.

            The beauty of technology is things get less expensive over time. For audio this means tighter integration and better specs for less cost.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            Indeed, it seems to smack of “I want the world for nothing”

          • derFunkenstein
          • 7 years ago

          “Forgive me for giggling over how you’re pining for an uber-cheap phone with a high-end DAC so that we can play our MP3s” – 98% of all smartphone users

          Much like all audio hardware, there’s a premium you have to be willing to pay in order to play.

            • 00-Evan
            • 7 years ago

            What annoys me is there are some phones that are otherwise average which have high end DACs, like my Nexus S(bought for $200), but they aren’t as common as I would like, which yes, I can understand may not be completely reasonable.

            Guess i’m just used to being spoilt for choice with desktop PCs, where you can get an average machine with 1 great part.

            EDIT: I don’t mean to imply that I demand a top of the line phone for $300, i’m fine with an average phone, it’s just that only top of the line phones have good audio, which annoys me.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            In case you didn’t know, and it seems like maybe you didn’t, Android can output audio via USB to a lot of USB DACs. It’s less than ideal because it’s not built in to the phone and different phones may or may not work, but lots of people do this with the SGS3. There is one called the UD100 which is a tiny little PCB, and although it’s not a headphone amp as well people use it that way, others hook it up to a separate headphone amp.

            Sometimes audiophiles need to make these sacrifices. 🙂 Check out this thread: [url<]http://www.head-fi.org/t/595071/android-phones-and-usb-dacs[/url<]

    • ratte
    • 7 years ago

    Google calls the display tech “True RGB Real Stripe PLS” whatever that is.
    And it is powered by the Exynos 5 ( dualcore A15 + Mali 604).

    There is a video on the verge about the design of N4 and N10

      • Helmore
      • 7 years ago

      PLS is Samsung’s competing product to IPS. It should actually be slightly better than a comparable IPS panel. The difference won’t be earth shattering though. Good to know that it is a proper RGB panel.

        • Airmantharp
        • 7 years ago

        Quality control (back-light bleed) and input lag have plagued retail offerings of desktop-sized PLS panels, but there’s still plenty of hope for tablets in both departments.

        If Samsung can get it under control, though, they just might start beating LG with shipments to HP, Dell, and NEC among others for their highest-end monitors.

      • Barbas
      • 7 years ago

      So not AMOLED then. From what I’ve read it’s hard to call PLS or IPS better, they have about the same image quality

      • kroker
      • 7 years ago

      I’m relieved to hear this. I’ve read that some people are having burn-in problems with AMOLED screens. I know LCDs can suffer from something similar to burn-in, but it’s less severe and usually not permanent. I know about OLED/AMOLED’s advantages over LCD, but I think I still prefer a display that doesn’t degrade with time.

        • Airmantharp
        • 7 years ago

        Galaxy S and Galaxy Note here, no burn-in problems. It’s the same story as with plasmas, except SAMOLED seems to have corrected the problems faster.

    • flip-mode
    • 7 years ago

    I’ll be interested in seeing some reviews of the Nexus 4. Is this the first Nexus not done by Samsung?

    Do the home icons rotate with orientation? Looks like it!

    Is the camera better than the shat-shooter on my Nexus S? Better be!!!

    I suppose 4G is standard issue now? Better be!!!

    How’s battery life? Nexus S is sort of OK on battery life but really only after I install Task-Kill. With Task-Kill installed and set on aggressive I get 48 hours on a charge, but Task-Kill should not be necessary – Android should do better power-saving.

      • SsP45
      • 7 years ago

      The original Nexus phone, the Nexus One, was made by HTC.

      • Ethyriel
      • 7 years ago

      HTC made the original Nexus One. I for one am really excited, but it looks like a switch to T-Mobile from Sprint would be in order. Luckily I got grandfathered into Sprint’s old ETF structure, so I’m probably down under $100 now.

      There is no true 4G or CDMA, just GSM/HSPA+.

      Yeah, battery life blows in Android. I’ve been thinking about one of those big Seidio batteries for my Nexus S, but I’m pretty sure the Nexus 4 has a built in battery. Hopefully they took advantage of that to increase the size of the battery. I’m afraid that quad core beast is going to kill that, though. Only having a single core device at this point, does anyone know if Cyanogenmod’s power management settings allows disabling of cores?

        • DancinJack
        • 7 years ago

        CM doesn’t so much as certain kernels. I can turn off one core on my Galaxy Nexus with specific kernels if I want. I don’t think I would do it though. It’s like the A/C. Fiddling with it can cost more than just leaving it at a stable temp.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        Well the built-in battery is 2100mah. It’s a big improvement over the 1500mah on the Nexus S. But the screen is much bigger and very well may need more power to light it.

          • Ethyriel
          • 7 years ago

          Not to mention three extra CPU cores, I’m assuming clocked higher. We’ll see once reviews start rolling in, but it looks like a worthy upgrade.

            • Spunjji
            • 7 years ago

            More CPU cores does not equal less battery life. The current generation of chips shut down cores that aren’t being used, so with proper scheduler support (like you get with a Nexus phone) your battery life won’t get hurt unless you hammer them all the time. Same goes for clock-speed.

            As a practical comparison, my 5.5″ quad-core 1.6Ghz Galaxy Note 2 gets more than double the battery life of my old under-volted 3.7″ single-core 1Ghz Motorola Defy. The battery is double the size, but even then that’s a serious improvement in efficiency.

            So, if battery life is your concern, just don’t be doing any video editing on the phone and you’ll be fine.

        • Corrado
        • 7 years ago

        I bagged Android for a LONG time for bad battery life, but my Galaxy S3 gets better life than my iPhone 4S or my wifes iPhone 5 did/do.

      • Laykun
      • 7 years ago

      Nexus 7 done by ASUS.

        • flip-mode
        • 7 years ago

        Referring to Nexus phones.

          • diable
          • 7 years ago

          The Nexus 4 is made by LG. Samsung made the Nexus S and Galaxy Nexus.

            • flip-mode
            • 7 years ago

            Yep!

            • deruberhanyok
            • 7 years ago

            The Nexus One was made by HTC. So was the Google G1, if you want to count that on the list even though it was before they had the “nexus” label.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      4.1.2 on the Nexus 7 also allows rotating the home screen, just FYI. It was a not-talked-about feature because I don’t think Google really wanted to do it. Everyone wanted it though.

        • willmore
        • 7 years ago

        Forces screen orientation is horrible from a user perspective. Unless every app is forced to use the same orientation, there’s going to be pain. I’m a much happier user on 4.1.2 than I was on 4.1.1 because of this. Transition from a landscape app through the home screen to another landscape app? Without rotation? Yes!

    • UberGerbil
    • 7 years ago

    I assume none of these have SD slots?
    Anyway, there’s the news I was looking for:
    [quote<]Google has added a 32GB model to its Nexus 7 line. The new device will sell for $249, bumping the 16GB model down to $199. [/quote<]You know, when I first saw "support for multiple users" I was a little nonplussed, but then I remembered just this Saturday night we were scrambling to find a restaurant with space for 6 and my friend was complaining that her kids had so messed around with her iPhone that she couldn't even find her OpenTable app. Though the highlight was two people simultaneously trying to use Siri to look up a phone number and failing miserably, albeit in the somewhat entertaining fashion that oft accompanies speech mis-recognition,

      • DancinJack
      • 7 years ago

      That could have been avoided by a “spotlight search.”

        • UberGerbil
        • 7 years ago

        In other words this was the standard Apple “You’re using it wrong” problem?

          • DancinJack
          • 7 years ago

          I guess. I think that’s a standard technology “you’re doing it wrong” problem at this point. Almost everyone has implemented some variation on global search. Windows, Android, iOS all have one off the top of my head. People should learn about these things and make their lives much, much easier.

          Always confuses me when someone scrolls through pages of apps or looks through every app in their start menu. Just search for the dang thing.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 7 years ago

          I wouldn’t go that far, but spotlight will find stuff you can’t otherwise find.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      kids corner on wp8 will solve that issue.

    • jjj
    • 7 years ago

    300$ for the Nexus 4 with it’s quad core Krait is quite nice (unless we get quad core A15 at CES from Nvidia) except is has no SD and LTE.I don’t care about LTE but i do care about SD so that makes both devices pointless for me. I am, however, eager to see numbers for that dual core A15 and the Mali T604 (seen some for the Chromebook on Gigaom but want more) – the screen ofc is a marketing feature so w/e.

    Edit: the SoC has been confirmed,at least, by an ARM blog [url< ]post.http://blogs.arm.com/multimedia/824-mali-t600-series-the-new-nexus-between-graphics-and-compute/%5B/url<]

      • chuckula
      • 7 years ago

      [RDF]You know what we said about high resolution being the greatest thing ever? Well, after this 10″ tablet coming out at 2560×1600 and the iPad Mini having a bigger screen + lower resolution than the Nexus 7, we have decided that REALITY MUST CHANGE! From now on, *lower* resolutions are better, unless Apple has the higher resolution, in which case Retina is still the best. Oh, and if the resolutions are the same, then YOU ARE JUST SEEING IT WRONG if you don’t think Apple is the best![/RDF]

        • Damage
        • 7 years ago

        I believe PenTile displays have 50% fewer red and blue subpixels than the advertised resolution would indicate. If this tablet has that kind of display, its true resolution is ~66% lower than 2560×1600, assuming Google quotes the specs like other makers of PenTile-based devices. The PPI would be correspondingly lower, as well.

          • cegras
          • 7 years ago

          Are such devices even possible? I seem to recall the general sentiment that OLED’s are not ready for large resolutions / high pixel density.

            • Damage
            • 7 years ago

            Yeah, dunno. Seems unlikely.

          • chuckula
          • 7 years ago

          Actually (as other posters have already noted) it turns out that the display is using PLS which is even slightly better than IPS on a pixel per pixel basis.

        • Silus
        • 7 years ago

        [RDF] Also if your photos have a purple haze, the problem is you are a bad photographer. Apple can help you get into photography classes for a nominal fee of a kidney. If Apple Maps gets you to a different location, it’s because Siri actually read your mind and directed you to the place you really wanted directions to. Please note that Apple is not liable if you end up at the bottom of a cliff…the truth is you wanted to be there. If you survive, but your device is ruined from the fall, Apple is not liable either since you wanting to be at the bottom of a cliff is not part of the AppleCare program.[/RDF]

      • UberGerbil
      • 7 years ago

      Link?

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        NONE NEEDED. HE READ IT ON [url<]http://WWW.MACFANS.COM[/url<]

      • 5150
      • 7 years ago

      I think Jennifer Lawrence summed it up best.

      [url<]http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mceygjcD651ryb0hd.gif[/url<]

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        Joey Lawrence said it better.

        [url<]http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m2fmtyFdYO1qbq7sk.jpg[/url<]

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      Pentile at 2560×1600 deliver 8.2 million cell.
      4 million green, 2 million red, 2 million blue

      ipad 3 at 2048×1536 delivers 9.4 million cell
      3 million green, 3 million red, 3 million blue

      Pentile is Bayer for display… If you know, Bayer is a B* to work with.
      Its a cheap trick to get more resolution at the cost of edge fringe.
      Of course when you get density hi enough, it matter less, but you also get less benefits.

      So a discreet Pentile pixel can represent 65K color out of a limited pallet (ex: no gray)
      So you need to blend across pixels to get correct colors.
      In contract true RGB pixel will get you the full 16 million spectrum of color (at 8bit depth)

      • DancinJack
      • 7 years ago

      [quote=”The Verge”<]Google has officially unveiled the new Nexus 10 tablet running Android 4.2. Built by Samsung but clearly designed by Google, the tablet features a very impressive 10-inch screen at 2560 x 1600 resolution, clocking in at 300ppi. Google calls it "True RGB Real Stripe PLS," and in our short time with the tablet we found it to be on par with the iPad's Retina display, with sharp text, excellent color fidelity, and great viewing angles.[/quote<] Now apologize, Adi. Where did you even get your info?

        • 5150
        • 7 years ago

        Steve told him in a dream, right before he ripped his shirt off.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        Nice find. PLS is a sort of Samsung custom IPS with some superior specs. Some info:

        [url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPS_panel#Super_PLS[/url<]

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      Wow, an Apple RDF post as first post. Well done! Don’t worry, Apple stopped promoting PPI when they copied everyone else by making the ‘we won’t make a 7″ tablet’ iPad Mini so clearly PPI no longer matters!

      • Yeats
      • 7 years ago

      You’re the Rush Limbaugh of the AAPL world, aren’t you?

        • adisor19
        • 7 years ago

        Perhaps i jumped the gun a liiiiiitle too early on this one 😉

        Adi

          • DancinJack
          • 7 years ago

          You wouldn’t have been doing your job if you didn’t jump the gun without facts. No worries.

          • MadManOriginal
          • 7 years ago

          No worries bro, I still downvoted AND mocked you!

          Thanks for the opportunity to do so!

      • flip-mode
      • 7 years ago

      Downvoted for coming clean and apologizing! Not a worthy Apple fanboy!

        • BIF
        • 7 years ago

        Downvoted you because I realized that this would be my first time downvoting you and I probably will never have a truly good reason as long as I live anyway. Cheers! 😀

          • flip-mode
          • 7 years ago

          Upvoting you for … no reason in particular.

      • BIF
      • 7 years ago

      I downthumbed you for saying “Pentile” and getting it past the censor. For shame!

      😀

      What…it’s NOT a bad word you say?

      • bjm
      • 7 years ago

      Apologize? Who are you, Tim Cook?

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