Wall Street Journal echoes Microsoft phone rumors

About a month ago, we quoted a handful of reports all citing evidence of an upcoming Microsoft phone. Now, the Wall Street Journal has chimed in, and it says a home-brewed Microsoft handset is indeed in the works—but it’s not clear whether the device will actually be released commercially.

According to the Journal, Microsoft has been working with "component suppliers in Asia" to test the phone but "isn’t sure if a product will go into mass production." Word comes from unnamed officials at some of those Asian suppliers, so the report seems solid. Too bad there isn’t much in there about the device itself—all the Journal says is that the phone will have a screen size "between four and five inches." (I hear the device might have a rectangular shape and the ability to play ring tones, too. Shh!)

Interestingly, the Journal suggests Microsoft’s partners may be more open to a Microsoft phone than they have been to the newly released Surface tablet. Nokia CEO Stephen Elop reportedly stated a couple of weeks back that a Microsoft handset would spur sales of all Windows Phone devices—which would, of course, be beneficial to Nokia, since that company seems to have bet its future on the platform. PC makers, on the other hand, reportedly haven’t been thrilled about Microsoft undercutting them with the Surface.

Comments closed
    • Farting Bob
    • 7 years ago

    Am i the only one who just presumes all “leaked” information from “unnamed sources” that appear in the Wall Street Journal are just paid advertisements for whatever company it’s talking about?

      • Decelerate
      • 7 years ago

      Are there any other types of sources for the WSJ? 🙂

    • jjj
    • 7 years ago

    Elop is saying what he is saying in public, it doesn’t mean that it’s what he thinks.He can’t whine about this and freak out the shareholder even more,maybe even get fired for not making a better contract with M$ when Nokia agreed to only use WP.
    Microsoft might be late to the party though, wouldn’t it be fun if Google and Amazon start selling devices at cost (see Nexus 4, Nexus 7,Kindle Fire) and maybe soon drop 3G/4G all together in phones or become a carrier too.They make money from other things (commerce, ads, payment systems),always did, so what’s to stop them from going on this path?
    They would just crush Apple, M$, VZW, ATT and have a head start against anyone that tries to adapt to the new model.Ofc the transition would be difficult with carriers and device makers around the world boycotting Android in a desperate move to survive so it has to be planned carefully.

      • ludi
      • 7 years ago

      Telecommunications is a completely different business model than anything Google does right now. So far they’ve only dipped their toes into broadband, and they’re only doing a very cautious test-market approach.

      The other problem with breaking into the mobile spectrum market is, uh, the spectrum. If Google or Amazon were intending to go that route, they would be making a takeover bid for T-Mobile.

        • jjj
        • 7 years ago

        You are thinking short term and assume they need 3G/4G/5G.
        Not having experience at telecoms is not a problem and becoming an ISP is not a must at first.Carriers are a drag on the industry so it would be better to get rid of them but it doesn’t have to start with that.

          • ludi
          • 7 years ago

          Is there an English translation available?

    • sweatshopking
    • 7 years ago

    FANGASM

    • jdaven
    • 7 years ago

    The big players are set for the game of the tech century:

    Apple – iDevices
    Google – Nexus
    Samsung – Galaxy
    Microsoft – Surface

    Round One. Fight!

      • yogibbear
      • 7 years ago

      BEHOLD THE iGalaxy Nexus with Metro OS?

        • Helmore
        • 7 years ago

        Now with more awesomeness in the form of WebOS compatibility.

      • Decelerate
      • 7 years ago

      Samsung is the only OEM with a “brand”, and people wonder why they’re so successful.

      About the news, this is hurting Nokia more than anyone. Almost feel like a 2B$ Horse of Troy.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 7 years ago

        I assume you mean only OEM that isn’t Apple?

          • Decelerate
          • 7 years ago

          Whu?

          [quote<]An original equipment manufacturer, or OEM, manufactures products or components that are purchased by another company and retailed under that purchasing company's brand name[/quote<]-Wiki Apple, Google, Samsung, Microsoft: One of them is not like the others... (and it's not Apple)

            • ludi
            • 7 years ago

            Technically correct, although not terribly helpful in analyzing the businesses. A company the size and diversity of Samsung, which makes some but not all of its components in-house, isn’t functionally different from a company like Apple that only hires third-party suppliers and assemblers but micromanages the supply chain right down to the point of having its CEO personally urge a supplier to resurrect long-dead R&D in order to obtain a critical component (Corning Gorilla Glass).

    • NeelyCam
    • 7 years ago

    So, first it was MS tablet, then an MS phone.

    Microsoft [i<]really[/i<] doesn't want partners in this ride. And whatever Elop says is irrelevant - he still works for Microsoft.

      • Game_boy
      • 7 years ago

      I still can’t decide whether he’s incompetent or deliberately trying to destroy Nokia so MS can pick it up at a low price, but with all of its engineering and patents intact.

        • BabelHuber
        • 7 years ago

        OTOH never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.

        OTOH everything what Elop has done was in Microsoft’s best interest, not in Nokia’s.

        He even killed the last home-grown phone OS, Meltemi, in June by firing all developers. Meltemi could have been used as Plan B [s<]if[/s<] when the WP-strategy fails. It was intended to be the successor of the S40 feature phones, so it was a smartphone OS designed for sub-$100 phones, though. But it's better to have something than having nothing, I'd say. As it currently looks like, Nokia is bancrupt [s<]if[/s<] when Lumias fail to gain market share this time, too - unless Nokia has a secret Android project,

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<] unless Nokia has a secret Android project,[/quote<] ..Do you have some inside info..?

            • BabelHuber
            • 7 years ago

            No I don’t. But if they have no Plan B, they are dead. What else could Plan B be- WebOS? 🙂

        • Arag0n
        • 7 years ago

        Most of manufacturers that went the Android path as HTC are not doing much better you know? Nokia should have join Android at the time that Samsung did, now it’s too late.

          • BabelHuber
          • 7 years ago

          You don’t seem to get th dimension of Nokias’s downfall: In 2010, they had 33% market share with symbian, in Q3 2010 alone Nokia sold 28 Million Symbian smartphones.

          In Q3 2012 they sold 2.9 Million WP-phones instead.

          This is an epic catastrophy, I do not now any market leader which has fallen so rapidly.

          Compare this with LG and Sony, both sold more than 7 Million Android phones in Q3 2012, and Sony’s smartphone business was profitable again.

          Betting the future on Microsoft has made Nokia micro and soft. Every other strategy would have been better.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      Google has been branding their own tablets/phones, albeit with partner branding as well.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]the device might have a rectangular shape [/quote<] MS for one could get away with this because of their cross-licensing deal with Apple.

      • Helmore
      • 7 years ago

      They only only need the cross-licensing if they made a rectangular shaped phone with rounded corners.

      • shaq_mobile
      • 7 years ago

      They may be pushing it too far if they use icons with primary colors and beveled edges. Then again, Microsoft never has and never will actually steal from Apple in even the remotest sense.

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