Kim Dotcom teases new Mega site

Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom’s new venture has found a home. Dotcom announced the Me.ga URL on Twitter, and millions are reportedly hitting the site already. The Mega cloud storage service won’t actually launch until January 20, the one-year anniversary of Dotcom’s arrest in conjunction with Megaupload. 

The coverage at BBC News has a few choice quotes from Dotcom, who says the new site will avoid dealing with hosts and backbone providers in the US. All uploaded files will be encrypted, and not even Mega administrators will be able to access them. Dotcom hopes that provision will keep Mega from running afoul of US laws, but he doesn’t seem willing to risk hosting any part of the service on US soil.

According to the details posted on the Mega front page, using the site will require only a web browser. Even without client software, batch uploads and downloads, parallel transfers, and resuming will be supported. Encryption and decryption will be handled server-side, but the user will hold the encryption keys. Folks will be able to share their files with other accounts for “easy online collaboration,” too. Yarrr.

Mega will also offer an SDK to allow aspiring developers to write client applications that work with the encryption scheme. Mega is currently looking for both hosting partners and investors. Dotcom apparently has enough cash to launch the service, but external investment may be required to keep it free of charge.

Comments closed
    • puppetworx
    • 7 years ago

    The service sounds very cool. We need popular services like this in order to keep rights to privacy intact. Especially with the most popular services caving into government threats continually (Facebook, Google, Dropbox, etc.). Say what you want about Kim Dotcom I always found his file-sharing site (MegaUpload) to be one of the best out there, I’ll certainly be using this when it comes online.

    • crazybus
    • 7 years ago

    Me.ga[lomaniac]?

    • redwood36
    • 7 years ago

    I wouldnt be surprised if this became his get out of jail card. Basically they didnt have enough to say charge him, or perhaps found that getting the users is more interesting. Its a honey pot, and it possibly logs the IPs or some such and feeds em to a government branch. I wouldn’t trust it.

      • Malphas
      • 7 years ago

      Yes, my thoughts exactly. Those of us that used LokiTorrent back in the early 2000’s will be aware that this sort of thing does genuinely happen.

        • delafield
        • 7 years ago

        Well, the FBI already seized Megaupload’s servers, so the FBI already has all the information it needs regarding users of Megaupload. In fact, just this week the DOJ filed papers indicating that they had been sifting through users’ data.

        So, I doubt it is a honeypot.

        Also, you can use the site for legit reasons too. And there will probably be free accounts. Always good to beware, though.

          • redwood36
          • 7 years ago

          whatever information they have with regard to previous users, Im sure they could gather much more useful information with a program set up to do such at the outset. However that being said, It’s not like they probably dont have enough actionable evidence as is. Perhaps the goal is to go after the communities who create such material.

    • cjava2
    • 7 years ago

    Although he was treated unfairly by the NZ authorities, Kim Dotcom is a huge douchebag who thinks he is above the rules. Go read up about his history.

    I remember a few years ago when he blatantly hacked in and spammed tons of car enthusiasts boards with thousands of PMs about his rally. And he was so smug about it. He’s not getting a penny of my money.

      • blitzy
      • 7 years ago

      He is a big fat ego and he doesn’t deserve any of the wealth he has, it has all been made off the backs of others hard work. I don’t think he deserves to be made scapegoat for all the illegal download that went through his site, but he knew what he was doing and deserves to lose every penny he earned from his illegal activities.

        • yogibbear
        • 7 years ago

        Just because someone is a douchebag doesn’t mean they are guilty.

          • sluggo
          • 7 years ago

          He’s guilty because he’s guilty. He’s a doucehbag because he’s a douchebag. But you are correct, the two conditions (if not the causes) are independent.

    • delafield
    • 7 years ago

    The article says: “Encryption and decryption will be handled server-side, but the user will hold the encryption keys.”

    Not true! The encryption and decryption will be handled client-side according to kim.com/mega/#/mega –

    “The new Mega encrypts and decrypts your data transparently in your browser, on the fly.”

    Key words: “in your browser.” If the encryption and decryption were handled by the server, then the keys would have to be transmitted and stored at me.ga at least during the encryption and decryption. That is something that Mega wants to avoid, even for a short period of time. Mega doesn’t want the keys at all.

    Not having the keys helps avoid baseless claims that Mega is knowledgeable of a specific instance of infringement – unless the claim of a specific instance of infringement is not baseless (e.g., it can be shown that Mega was made aware or should have known of a specific instance of infringement).

    • Game_boy
    • 7 years ago

    In MU’s absence there are already lots of large-file hosting sites, with faster speeds than MU had and positioning themselves better for legal use. There’s no single point of attack for a government any more.

      • UberGerbil
      • 7 years ago

      There were already quite a few when MU was running, and they’ve proliferated since. It’s not clear to me how any of them are actually functioning as going concerns, but since it’s almost trivial to build one on hosted servers there will always be more popping up.

    • ish718
    • 7 years ago

    The piracy must continue! This is what they get for making crappy products…

      • delafield
      • 7 years ago

      The easy encryption – if me.ga makes it that easy – will actually be valuable from the user’s perspective. I would use it. And it avoids government intrusion (i.e., the Megaupload user whose files were combed through by the FBI recently).

        • willmore
        • 7 years ago

        Encryption already is easy. I regularly pass encrypted files from my laptop to my android tablet through dropbox. The laptop uses EncFS and the Android device uses BoxCryptor. Heck iOS, OSX, and Windows can even join in the fun.

        It’s dead simple now, why would we need another file sharing site with some other system?

        Edit: Does the -1’ing troll want to make a statement?

    • dpaus
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]Dotcom hopes that provision will keep Mega from running afoul of US laws[/quote<] First thing that came to my mind: "not likely, when the DOJ seems quite willing to make up laws on-the-fly."

      • willyolio
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]"not likely, when the [s<]DOJ[/s<] [b<]RIAA[/b<] seems quite willing to make up laws on-the-fly."[/quote<] that the DOJ seems willing to enforce.

        • indeego
        • 7 years ago

        And the courts are all “What me worry?”

          • yogibbear
          • 7 years ago

          And the government is all like RETROACTIVE LAWS BE LEGAL MKKKKKKKAAAAAAAYYYYYYYYYYYYYY!!!!!!!!!

            • dpaus
            • 7 years ago

            OMG, we, like, [i<]are[/i<] a bunch of teenage girls!! OMG!!

            • thanatos355
            • 7 years ago

            You guys just made my day. <3

            • Game_boy
            • 7 years ago

            You said it GUUURRRRRRL

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            handbag!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This