Corsair adds new H100i, H80i liquid coolers

Looks like Corsair wasn’t finished updating its self-enclosed Hydro Series liquid coolers. After announcing replacements for the H50 and H60 a couple of weeks back, the company has now tackled the high-end H80 and H100, introducing new-and-improved successors dubbed the H80i and H100i.

Corsair says these latest models both feature "new, more efficient" copper cold plates and "improved" manifolds. The company claims to have improved the fan design "significantly," as well. The H80i and H100i both ship with 120-mm SP120L fans based on Corsair’s retail SP120 offerings. (The SP120L is rated for operation at up to 2700 RPM with up to 77 CFM of airflow and a noise level of 37.68 dBA.) The new coolers also have tubes made of a more flexible composite rubber than their predecessors, and Corsair has included its new magnetic mounting bracket to make the installation process simpler.

Left: the Hydro Series H100i. Right: the H80i. Source: Corsair.

In addition to all that, Corsair says the H80i and H100i are compatible with its Corsair Link scheme, which enables control and monitoring through software. Here are the details:

Out of the box compatibility with Corsair Link provides control over fan speeds and noise levels, pump head LED lighting customization, and the ability to create custom cooling profiles from the Corsair Link Dashboard’s easy-to-use software interface. An additional Corsair Link Digital connector on the pump head provides monitoring and control of other devices, such as Corsair Link equipped power supplies, Lighting Nodes, Cooling Nodes, and the Airflow Pro memory activity and temperature monitor kits.

The H100i and H80i are otherwise physically similar to their forebears. The former has a 240-mm radiator with dual 120-mm fans arranged side-by-side, while the latter has a "double-thick" radiator sandwiched between a pair of 120-mm fans. Corsair still offers a five-year warranty, too, but prices have gone up a little. Corsair quotes suggested pricing of $119.99 for the H100i and $99.99 for the H80i, compared to $114.99 and $84.99 for the H100 and H80, respectively. I already see the new coolers listed at Newegg, but they aren’t in stock just yet.

Comments closed
    • Arclight
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<](The SP120L is rated for operation at up to 2700 RPM with up to 77 CFM of airflow and a noise level of 37.68 dBA.)[/quote<] That sounds like the fan will be noisey.....

      • Farting Bob
      • 7 years ago

      You shouldnt need to have those fans going at anywhere near max speed to cool anything but a heavily OC’d bulldozer in a hot room during a Texan summer.

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    I am well aware that these coolers are essential for overclocking, but I really hope there won’t come a time when desktop processors will come stock with water cooling kits to run at stock speeds. Let’s stop at 140w, shall we?

      • Welch
      • 7 years ago

      Thanks to increased IPC, shrunk die sizes and all of the other advancements being made to CPUs, I just don’t see them making too many CPUs above 140w. So I think its safe to say that you wont see these closed loop liquid cooling setups coming as apart of an OEM package. Gotta imagine the liability that Intel or AMD would have by shipping these out there. Fans are so much cheaper by themselves, simple to implement and easier on space. If you were Intel or AMD you’d find it hard to make a closed loop setup like this that works in 90-95% of cases without question.

      Now, if your talking about high end offerings like Intels flagship $999 tradition :P, you may see that in the future. Rest assured your going to be paying for it in that already BS inflated price premium. Most any user buying a 1k CPU will likely have a case that can take something like this, and they hopefully know what they need in the first place. I have to admit, it sure would be a tempting thing if their higher end 500-600 offerings came with a liquid setup to tout their overclock-ability /shrug.

      • cynan
      • 7 years ago

      Sandy bridge E came [url=http://www.tomshardware.com/news/Intel-Sandy-Bridge-E-Liquid-Cooling,13666.html<]very close[/url<] to this. Instead, at the last minute, Intel decided to simply sell the stock Sandy bridge-E coolers separately.

    • Draphius
    • 7 years ago

    there so many closed loop systems for cpus, now i would like to see them take this where its needed most and create some sort of closed loops for gpus. every gpu ive tested with an air cooler is literally on the ragged edge when it comes to keeping a gpu cool. ive even come to realize that the microstuttering from sli setups can sometimes go away once u water cool the gpu’s. 42c is the highest i ever see on my gtx570’s even with 1.1v.

      • internetsandman
      • 7 years ago

      Asetek made one for a 5870 a while back I think, it was a single fan with a CPU GPU loop, though I never saw it for sale and can’t imagine it performed well

      The trouble with GPU loops is that there are just so many various board configurations you have to make a product for even if you limit yourself to the high end reference cards, you’ll have at least 4-6 various GPU’s to ensure compliance with if you want your product(s) to sell, and you can’t do like Corsair does and bundle different adapter kits, because the layouts of each GPU and graphics card can vary wildly, especially with their mounting holes. Not to mention the fact that there’s not really an incredibly standard part of almost every case you can rely on for GPU fan mounting, like you can with the rear 120mm fan mount for the CPU.

      Ideally, we’d have liquid cooling for both processors and they’d run cool and quiet, but reality doesn’t like ideals

      • Chrispy_
      • 7 years ago

      Main problem with GPU coolers is that there’s no universal mounting clip like you get with Intel/AMD cpu sockets.

      On top of that, more than just the GPU needs cooling – there’s a lot of VRM heat, and even the RAM gets hot running at 6GHz Making a custom waterblock that covers every configuration of GPU mounting, VRM location and RAM placement (on both sides) is practically impossible.

        • ludi
        • 7 years ago

        One way around that is to build a waterblock with a clip that provides a standard, high-pressure mount to a custom aluminum or copper plate adapter, then produce plate adapters for whatever major video cards are currently on the market. The plate doesn’t necessarily have to be more than about 3-5mm thick to efficiently move heat over to the waterblock.

        Videocard mods tend to be more fidgety than CPU cooler mods, though. Far too easy to warp the card and then have BGA chip pads come popping off like ice cubes.

          • Airmantharp
          • 7 years ago

          Given the popularity of MXM graphics modules in the mobile space, you’d think that they could agree on a single layout for GPUs that fall within given power envelopes. I mean, they’re all basically laid out the same already.

    • internetsandman
    • 7 years ago

    If its quieter than the vanilla H80 I might pick one up, my main computer still isn’t quite as quiet as I’d like it to be

      • Airmantharp
      • 7 years ago

      Anand rated the original H80 when set to Low (still more than enough for any modern CPU that’s reasonably overclocked) as the quietest amongst the integrated water-coolers.

        • Draphius
        • 7 years ago

        tell that to bulldozer!

          • Airmantharp
          • 7 years ago

          It’ll be hot, but it will be stable- maximum overclock may be limited depending on sample.

      • Draphius
      • 7 years ago

      well depending on the temps your cpu puts out when in use it still might not be quiet. its watercooled yes but it still has fans and those fans produce a very high db when run at full speed. 37.68 is crazy loud. to make it quiet would mean throwing away the stock fans and putting something else on which makes it an expensive proposition considering for a small bit more u could build yourself your own watercooling loop that will perform much better and can be upgraded and built upon down the road if u like or reuse many of the parts on a build later down the road.

        • internetsandman
        • 7 years ago

        If that’s the case then I might as well just chuck a couple of Notcua NF-F12’s in place of the stock fans of my current H80, I don’t really have the money to be doing much else at the moment in reality, but I have a whole bunch of spare parts that I’m eventually gonna cobble together into a spare rig and I might have added to that pile.

    • chuckula
    • 7 years ago

    These (like most other water coolers we’ve seen debut in the last 5 days) are just rebranded Asetek models. Which is fine since Asetek is very big in this area. What I’m really interested in are the 280mm radiators (2×140 mm fans). The larger radiator combined with better pumps and larger conduits could mean that these coolers finally beat larger air-coolers while also being easier to install without hanging several pounds of metal off the side of your motherboard.

      • ish718
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]"The larger radiator combined with better pumps and larger conduits could mean that these coolers finally beat larger air-coolers while also being easier to install without hanging several pounds of metal off the side of your motherboard.[/quote<] Yeah but they're twice the price of decent air cooling...

      • cynan
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]The larger radiator combined with better pumps and larger conduits could mean that these coolers finally beat larger air-coolers[/quote<] I doubt the performance increase due to these factors will be significant. The performance of the top model, H100i, will still struggle to best some of the top HSFs and not really come close to a properly planned custom water setup. These kits are great for scenarios where you want to have adequate cooling at somewhat reduced noise levels of a high performance HSF or really need extra room around the CPU socket. Otherwise, if value is your primary concern, a standard HSF is still the way to go.

      • Airmantharp
      • 7 years ago

      I think you’re missing the point- NONE of these, nor the ‘high-end’ (say, >$50) air-coolers are even remotely necessary to quietly keep an overclocked CPU cool.

      What you’re doing here is effectively and quietly cooling the CPU while getting the heat out of the case more efficiently than an air cooler can do it; even my lowly H60 can keep my 2500k cool at 4.8GHz.

        • ish718
        • 7 years ago

        Quietly? Both options have fans. Wether you have a 120mm fan on a giganto heatsink or on a radiator…

          • Airmantharp
          • 7 years ago

          Let me know when you’re able to cool a modern overclocked CPU without fans, thanks.

            • ermo
            • 7 years ago

            Just thinking out loud here, but how much surface area would you need on a radiator connected to a water block for the radiator to be able to dissipate 140W without a cooler, if we assume an ambient temperature of, say, 25 degrees celcius?

            Just for kicks, let’s assume that you connected the water block to a heatsink the size of a large midi ATX cabinet side panel, which itself is mounted on the side of the cabinet that is behind the motherboard and ensured the heatsink grooves encourage convection.

            Would that be enough or am I just crazy?

            • Airmantharp
            • 7 years ago

            You are crazy- a radiator without airflow other than convection would cook. With water’s ability to hold in heat, expect the CPU to throttle.

            There are heat-pipe based systems that do what you’re looking for.

            • cynan
            • 7 years ago

            [url=http://www.streacom.com/products/fc8-evo-fanless-chassis/<]These guys[/url<] sell finned aluminum enclosures where you can passively cool CPUs up to 95W TDP. And these are not overly large either. The case come with a special heatpipe heat sink that mounts to the processor and then fuses with the internal sides of the case so the heat dissipates throughout the fins.

          • cynan
          • 7 years ago

          Well, the more surface area you have, the less work the fans have to do. The fact that water has a high heat capacity (and a higher volumetric heat capacity than either copper or aluminum) means that a water cooled system does not need as much active cooling (is the cooling in these things water-based?) all other things equal. This is basically why you don’t need the fan to run as hard on these water cooling units (particularly the H100) to get the same cooling as an HSF. In reality, the difference isn’t that great, but it can result in getting away with a few less decibels than a comparable HSF.

          Depending on your case and air flow, you could also be slightly further ahead due to the fact that these expel the hot air outside the case (as Airmantharp pointed out).

        • Draphius
        • 7 years ago

        it really all depends on the situation. many people have high ambient temps and an air cooler will be on the ragged edge no matter how good it is. and btw i have a 2500K thats a bit of a redheaded stepchild but the only way to get it to 5.0ghz on water was to bump the voltage way up close to 1.5 and my noctua nh-d14 with 3 140mm fans on it couldnt keep my system stable!, but my HK 3.0 block with a proper water setup can keep it stable 24/7 at a slightly lower voltage now aswell.

          • Airmantharp
          • 7 years ago

          Mine’s probably close to the same; I decided that spending more than I did for my H60 wasn’t worth another 200-300MHz, when it was already stable at 4.8GHz and 110% voltage.

        • cynan
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]I think you're missing the point- NONE of these, nor the 'high-end' (say, >$50) air-coolers are even remotely necessary to quietly keep an overclocked CPU cool.[/quote<] Have you tried cooling an even moderately overclocked 6-core Sandy bridge-E?

      • Draphius
      • 7 years ago

      140mmx1,2,3 is a pita to mount in most cases and even more of a pita to find good fans for. the 120mm scythe gt still beats most other 140mm fans when used on 140mm rads. it all comes down to the case and what u want in the end. and to be honest 280mm is way overkill for most cpus these days, not all but most. i can get away with cooling cpu,vrm,2xgpu’s with a 420mm rad on one loop but just barely

    • bjm
    • 7 years ago

    Watercooling has come a long way; gone are the days of having to connect your own tubing, priming the setup, testing for leaks and air pockets, etc. Now you just tighten the screws and you’re done.

      • Washer
      • 7 years ago

      If you want truly superior cooling you will not find it in these enclosed kits. You’ll still need to assemble your own loop and deal with all the hassle that comes with it. In general these kits are greatly overrated, the two biggest perks I can see is that there’s a smaller gap in performance between high and low fan speeds compared to most air-only setups and if you’re lacking vertical space above the CPU socket but have room around a fan mount you can get good cooling. Particularly something like the H80/H80i in a Lian Li TU200 is a rig I wouldn’t mind having.

      Otherwise I just don’t see the point in spending over $40 on a heatsink+fan. The returns are very limited beyond that point.

      • GFC
      • 7 years ago

      But thats the whole fun lol.

      • StashTheVampede
      • 7 years ago

      If your goal is to say “hey, I’ve got a liquid cooled PC”, then putting one of these bolt on setups is nice. Corsair’s lineup isn’t necessarily the quietest or coolest for the same dollar.

      Custom done liquid cooling generally performs better than the OOTB units.

      • cynan
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]Gone are the days of having to connect your own tubing, priming the setup, testing for leaks and air pockets, etc. Now you just tighten the screws and you're done.[/quote<] Note exactly. These corsair gadgets don't really offer significantly better cooling than a top of the line HSF, though they can be a bit quieter and free up some room around the CPU socket. A properly planned custom water cooling setup will net you way more cooling performance than something like these products ever could. And the bang/buck in the custom water cooling kit market is getting better and better now that there is more competition (ie, with Asian companies like XSPC, etc). I do concede that custom water cooling is not worth the hassle or cost for the majority.

      • Draphius
      • 7 years ago

      no its not. these are just glorified air coolers. u still need to design a true loop to get what people would consider watercooling performance. im happy they have these so people get there feet wet but in the end they are the same as a high end air cooler just a bit more expensive

        • Airmantharp
        • 7 years ago

        You need to design a chilled loop to get anything worthwhile; at which point you’re approaching or exceeding your hardware budget with cooling.

        Worth it if you’re putting 3+ GPUs under water, but still damn expensive compared to reasonable alternatives.

    • flip-mode
    • 7 years ago

    Not sure if fans are really high quality… or just looks.

      • Derfer
      • 7 years ago

      They’re high quality. They match the GTs on noise/performance, however I’ve heard their tone is higher, but I find that preferable to the annoying bearing noise of the GTs.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This